Translate

Friday, 1 July 2016

Danish oil/chemical tanker (ex-Saone 2004-2007) Torm Saone 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 22 June 2016

Denmark-flagged, homeport Copenhagen, Denmark, IMO 9295323, MMSI 220570000 and call sign OYMM2. Ex-Saone renamed October 2007. Owned by Torm, Hellerup, Denmark and managed by Torm Singapore, Singapore. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2004.

Canadian bulk carrier Federal Asahi 2000-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9200419, MMSI 538006753 and c all sign V7NK7. Owned by Fednavy Group, Montreal, Canada and managed by Anglo Eastern Shipmanagement, Hong Kong, China. Built by Oshima Shipbuilding, Saikai, Japan in 2000.

Singapore car carrier Asian Vision 1997-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

South Korea-flagged, IMO 9122966, MMSI 441992000 and call sign D8CU according to maritinetraffic, according to marine traffic Singapore-flagged an d MMSI 565421000. Owned by Eukor Shipowning Singapore, Singapore and managed by Wilhelmsen Shipmanagement Korea, Pusan, South Korea. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1997.

British-flagged LPG tanker (ex-Vermilion First 2010-) BW Sakura 2016?

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9397080, MMSI 235109536 and call sign 2IGK9 according to marine traffic. According to maritime connector has the LPG tanker Vermilion First this IMO, MMSI 357786000, Panama-flagged, owned and managed by Daiichi Chuo Marine, Tokyo, Japan and built by MHI Nagasaki Shipyard&Engine Works, Nagasaki, Japan in 2010. Shipspotting calls her the British-flagged Vermilion First with as MMSI 235109536 and call sign 2IGK9. Q88.com calls her BW Sakura ex-Vermilion First, Isle of Man-flagged, homeport Douglas, call sign 2IGK9. Built 29 January 2010. Owned by BW Liberty Limited and managed by BW Fleet Management AS.

Swiss container ship (ex-Pohang Senator 1998-2008, CSAV Pyrenees 2008-2013, Pohang 2012) MSC Sao Paulo 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9147071, MMSI 636016492 and call sign D5GL3. Owned and managed by MSC Mediterranean Shipping, Geneva, Switzerland. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1998. Ex-Pohang Senator renamed May 2008, CSAV Pyrenees renamed January 2013 and Pohang renamed April 2013.

German oil/chemical tanker CPO Germany 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

United Kingdom-flagged, IMO 9353096, MMSI 235060255 and call sign 2AJQ4. Owned and managed by Offen Reederei, Hamburg, Germany. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2008.

Chinese container ship (ex-APL Illinois 2009-2014) Astrid Schulte 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9398230, MMSI 249851000 and call sign 9HA2040. Ex-APL Illinois renamed May 2014. Owned and managed by BSHM China, Shanghai, China. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2009.

Norwegian offshore supply ship Deep Cygnus 2009

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Panama-flagged, IMO 9479541, MMSI 370092000 and call sign 3ERL4. Owned and managed by Volstad Management, Aalesund, Norway. Built by Bergen Group Fosen, Rissa, Norway in 2009.

Norwegian bulk carrier Ogna 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Norway, homeport Bergen, Norway, IMO 9413418, MMSSI 259832000 and call sign LAFR7. Owned and managed by Mowinckels Rederi, Bergen, Norway. Built by Jiangsu Rongsheng Heavy Inudtrsies, Rugao, China in 2008.

Aland Islands crude oil tanker Thornbury 2001-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 June 2016

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9226970, MMSI 311168000 and call sign C^RS7. Built by Daewoo Shipbuilding&Marine Engineering, Geoje, South Korea in 2001. Owned and managed by Lundqvist Rederierna, Mariehamn, Aland Islands.

Singapore LPG tanker Kent 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9343118, MMSI 636013308 and call sign A8MA5. Owned and managed by Eastern Pacific Shipping, Singapore. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2007.

Russian oil products tanker SCF Neva 2006-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Russia-flagged, IMO 9333400, MMSI 273350570 and call sign UBI2. Built by STX Offshore&Shipbuilding, Jinhae, South Korea in 2006. Owned and managed by Unicom Management Services St. Petersburg, St. Petersburg, Russia.

Moroccan container ship Nicolas Delmas 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9220861, MMSI 311326000 and call sign C6SF5. Owned by Marocaine de Navigation, Casablanca, Morocco and managed by Midocean IOM, Douglas, Isle of Man, United Kingdom. Built by CSBC, Kaouhsiung, Taiwan in 2002.

British torpedo boats torpedoed off Scheveningen, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder courant dated 16 August 1918

An item reported that two British torpedo boats which protected the yesterday afternoon arrived convoy were off Scheveningen, Netherlands torpedoed. Four sailors drowned. Another newspaper Tilburgsche courant dated 16th confirmed the news adding that the arrival was on the Nieuwe Waterweg at Hoek van Holland, Netherlands and that the attack found place during the changing of the coming and going convoys. Another Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 16th reported that the attack was unknown for the Dutch authorities.

French Rhine flotilla strengthened according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder courant dated 16 August 1918

An item dated Paris, France 26th reported that a gunboat and a destroyer added to the French Rhine flotilla via Chalons, Toul and Nancy went to Strasbourg. The Rhine flotilla now numbered 10 units.

Russian fleet at Helsingfors, Finland threatened by German forces according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 6 April 1918

An item dated Petrograd, Russia 5th reported that German forces captured Ekenäs south of Hangö, Finland sinking three Russian ships in the harbour. The Russian fleet in the Finnish waters was now in jeopardy. An item dated Stockholm, Sweden 4th supplied more details. The German force was well overwhelming numbering40.000 men. When the German transports arrived off Hangö seemed the commanding officer of the Russian Baltic Fleet sent a deputation to the German command. With which purpose was unknown. The Russian protested against the presence of the German troops which was a violation of the granted security of the Russian fleet. Some commanding officers of Russian warships including four submarines wintering at Hangö blew up their ships preventing a capture by the Germans. The German transports could only approach Hangö while the Russian icebreaker Volkynitz made a free ice passage. She had left a day earlier Helsingfors towards Reval, Estonia and surrendered there to the Germans. The Russian fleet at Helsingfors could not go towards Kronstadt, Russia lacking icebreakers. At that moment were at Helsingfors lying 2 battleships, a division destroyers, 5 submarines and a large number of transports.

American Secretary of Nay proposing new shipbuilding program according to the Dutch newspaper De Volksvriend dated 16 October 1913

An item reported that the US Secretary of Navy Daniels intended to propose to strengthen the US navy with 3 large battleships, some submarines and a number of destroyers.(1)

Note
1. Josephus Daniels (18 May 1862 Washington, North Carolina, USA-15 January 1948 Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). Secretary of navy 5 March 1913-4 March 1921, in 1933-1941 embassador to Mexico.

British Admiralty decided to strengthen Home Fleey according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 23 February 1913

An item reported that the British Admiralty decided to add 8 battleships squadron to the fleet in the North Sea. According to the Daily Telegraph was the 4th battleship squadron that since the reorganisation a year earlier was stationed at Gibraltar transferred to the North Sea. In the home water were then 4 battleship squadrons 1st class available meaning complete prepared for warfare. A German newspaper wondered what the value of a naval treaty between the United Kingdom and Germany was when England stationed her strongest warships in the North Sea.

US Atlantic Fleet intended to visit the Mediterranean according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 23 April 1913

An item referred to an announcement of the US Secretary of Navy reporting that probably in the end of January 1914 nearly the complete US Atlantic Fleet intended to visit the Mediterranean for a period of 23 months. According to the rumours there were 21 battleships to come.

US Navy allowed to built one battleship according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 27 February 1913

An item dated Washington, USA 26th reported that the despite the positive advice of the naval commission to built two battleships the US House of Representatives the bill disapproved.  A suggestion of the commission to built just one battleships was with 144 against 133 votes approved. The republicans were almost unanimous against the building in contrary to the democrats.

Thursday, 30 June 2016

Turkish, Russian and German warships handed over to Allied forces according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 6 December 1918

German battle cruiser SMS Goeben

Russian battleship Imperator Aleksandr III

An item dated London, England referred to an announcement of the British Admiralty reporting that all Turkish warships were handed over to the Allied forces and arrived at Constantinople, Turkey. The former German battle cruiser Goeben (1) which was handed over, was lying off Stenia, Bosporus. The former Russian warships of the Black Sea Fleet manned by German sailors were also handed over to the Allied forces. It were the dreadnought Volya (former Imperator Alexander III) and 6 destroyers.(2) Further more were four German submarines handed over of which 3 were destined for Ismid, Sea of Marmara.

Notes
1. Moltke-class. Sister ship Moltke. Building ordered on 8 April 1909, laid down at the shipyard of Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany on 28 August 1909, launched on 28 March 1911, commissioned on 2 July 1912, handed over to the Turkish government on 16 August 1914, renamed Yavuz Sultan Selim and commissioned in the Turkish navy. Decommissioned on 20 December 1950, renamed Yavuz in 1935, stricken on 14 November 1954 and finally broken up in 1973. Displacement 22.979 tons/22.616 long tons (design)-25.400 tons/25.000 long tons (full loaded) and as dimensions 186,6 x 30 x 9,2 metres or 612.2 x 98.5 x 30.3 feet. The Parsons turbines supplied via 4 screws 51.289 (design)-84.609 (maximum) shp allowing a speed of 25,5 (design)-28,4 (maximum) knots and with a speed of 14 knots a range of 4.120 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 1.053 men included 43 officers. The armour consisted of a 10-29cm/3.9-11” thick belt. a 2,54-7,62cm/1-3” inch deck with the gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 23cm/9.1”, 23cm/9.1” and 34cm/14”. The armament consisted of 5x2-28cm/11” L/50 guns, 12-15cm/5.9” guns and 12-8,8cm/3.5“ guns.
2. Of the Imperatritsa Maria-class. Ex-Imperator Aleksandr III. Her keel was laid down at the Russud Shipyard at Nikolayev was ordered on 30 April 1911, the contract for building her dates from 13 April 1912!, launched on 15 April 1914, commissioned on 17 July 1917 in the Imperial Russian navy, renamed on 29 April Volia and not Wolga/Volga as sometimes is suggested, in November that year was she commissioned in the Soviet Navy, on 19 June 1918 refused her crew to scuttle her and she went to Sevastopol where her armament was removed and the crew landed except for guards. On 1 October was she fallen into German hands and on the 15th made she a short voyage under German flagged. On 24 November handed the German forces her over to British forces and in December she departed towards Izmit manned by sailors from the HMS Agamemnon which ‘accompanied’ her during this voyage. Returning in 1919 to Sevastopol was she on 1 November handed over to the White Russian forces which commissioned her as the General Alekseyev. As part of the so-called Wrangel’s fleet was she interned by the French cabinet in Bizerte. End 20’s was she sold to be broken which actually happened not earlier as in 1936. Her main guns were used by German and Finnish forces and some were after the Second World War used by Soviet forces. With a displacement of 23.789 tons/23.413 long tons were her dimensions 551’x 90‘0” x 27.4’ or 168 x 27,43 x 8,36 metres. The steam turbines and 20 boilers supplied 26.000 shp allowing a speed of 21 knots and a range of 1.640 nautical miles. With a crew of 1.154 men consisted her armament of 4x3-30,5cm/12” guns, 18x1-13cm/5.1” guns, 4x1-7,62cm/3” anti aircraft guns and 4x1-45cm/17.7” submerged torpedo tubes. The armour consisted of a 12,5-26,25cm thick belt at the waterline, a 0.0-5cm thick deck, while the turrets, barbettes and conning tower were protected by respectively 25cm, 25cm and 30cm thick armour.

British battle cruiser HMS Hood world largest warship according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 10 January 1919

Preliminary design for the British battle cruiser HMS Hood [1919]

Drawing made by G.J. Frans Naerebout and published in Op de Lange Deining written by G.A.J. Bovens

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the new British warship Hood nearing completion and seemed to be the largest warship of the world. Her length was 896 feet and she was armed with 8-15” guns. Her hull was armoured and could no be damaged by exploding torpedoes [protection by torpedo bulge] and mines. Her speed was at least 40 miles. Building costs 3.25 million pond sterling.(1) Of the same design were another 3 ships to be built.(2)

Notes
1. Nicknamed Mighty Hood. Pennant 51. Her building at the shipyard of John Brown&Company was ordered on 7 April 1916, laid down on 1 September, launched on 22 August 1918, commissioned on 15 May 1920 as world largest warship, sunk on 24 May 1941 during her battle with the German battleship Bismarck. The only one of the four projected Admiral class battle cruisers caused by an sufficient design despite the modifications after the Battle of Jutland (31 May-1 June 1916). During this battle England lost battle cruisers due to the weakness of their armour. Building costs 6.025.000 pond sterling. With a displacement of 46.680 long tons/47.430 tons (deep load) and as dimensions 262,3 x 31,8 x 9,8 metres or 860’7”x 104’2”x 32’0”. The geared Brown-Curtis steam turbines with the 24 Yarrow water-tube boilers delivered via 4 shafts and screws144.000 shp allowing in 1920 a speed of 31 knots which was by 1941 reduced to 28 knots. With a reduced speed of 20 knots she had in 1931 a range of 5.332 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 1.433 (in 1919)-1.325 (by 1941). The original armament consisted of 4x2-15”/38,1cm guns, 12x1-5,5” guns, 4x1-4” anti aircraft guns and 6-21”?53,3cm guns. When she met her final fate was she armed with 4x2-15”/38,1cm guns, 7x2-4” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 3x8-2pd quick firing anti aircraft pom pom, 5x4-0.5” machine guns, 5x20- barrel unrotated projectile mounts and 2x2-21”/53,3cm surfaced torpedo tubes. She was also armoured with a 6-12”/15,2-30,5cm thick belt, a 3”-0.3’/7,6-1,9cm deck, 4”-5”/10,2-12,7cm bulk heads with the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 5“-12”/12,7-30,5cm, 11”-15”/27,9-38,1cm and 9”-11”/22,9-27,9cm. The scheduled major rebuilding planned in 1941 was never realized due to the outbreak of the Second World War
2. The Admiral-class, preceded by the Courageous-class, to be succeeded by the cancelled G3 battle cruisers, consisting of the Hood, Anson, Howe and Rodney, the latter 3 finally cancelled on 27 February 1919.

French cruiser destroyed German plant at Haifa, Palestina according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 19 December 1915

An item dated Paris, France 18th referred to an official announcement of the French naval staff reporting that a French cruiser destroyed the German plant for war stores at Haifa, Palestina completely.

Italian troops landed in Albania according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 16 December 1915

An item dated Rome, Italy 16th reported that the disembarkment of the Italian troops in Albania was completed. The steamship Umbito and the destroyer Intrepido hit mines during the landings. An Austrian torpedo boat fired at the convoys without success.

German steamship Permabuco and Soderhamn torpedoed in the Baltic by British submarines according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 21 October 1915

An item reported that in the Baltic Sea the German steamship Permabuco of Hamburg, Germany loaded with ore and the German steamship Soderhamn of Hamburg loaded with timber were torpedoed by British submarines. Their crews were rescued.

German steamship Scottia nearly escaped from attack by British submarine in the Baltic according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 21 October 1915

An item referred to tidings from Stettin that the with ore loaded German steamship Scottia underway from Sweden towards her homeport Stettin was followed by a British submarine from Haele, Bornholm until the light ship Adlergrund. There appeared suddenly a Zeppelin and who was warned by the Scottia about the submarine. The submarine disappeared however at the moment that she sighted the zeppelin which preparing to attack her.

British admiral Jellicoe and Beattie claiming to have forced the German battle fleet to retreat according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 5 June 1916

An item dated London, England 8th referred to the announcement of the British Admiralty received by the Associated Press. According to the reports of the admirals Jellicoe (1) and Beatty (2) entered the British battle fleet the waters of the enemy to seek contact with the German fleet.(3) Although less strong attacked the British the complete German battle fleet forcing her to retreat with no hope on further actions of her side.

Notes
1. John Rushworth Jellicoe, 1st Earl Jellicoe (5 December 1859 Southampton, Hamsphire, England-20 November 193 Kensington, London, England). Dismissed in the rank of Admiral of the Fleet. Commanded the Grand Fleet, First Sea Lord 30 November 1916-10 January 1918and Governor-General of New Zealand 1920-1924.
2. David Richard Beatty (17 January 1871 Stapeley, Cheshire, England-12 March 1936 London, England). Dismissed in the rank of Admiral of the Fleet. Commanded the 1st Battle cruiser Squadron 1913-1916 and the Grandfleet 1916-1918 and First Sea Lord 1 November 1919-30 July 1927.
3. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.

British fleet had her own theatre ship according to the Dutch newspaper De Sumatra Post dated 26 January 1918

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record reporting that a large theatre ship was added to the British fleet to entertain the crews of the ships. She was such large that she was able to accommodate the crew of a battleship of battle cruiser at the same time. The shows were given by the own personnel. If any ship was interested was a simple request of her commanding officer to the fleet command enough to get the theatre ship along side for a evening. The same item also mentioned that some large warships even seemed to have billiards on board for the sailors.

German navy intended at Jutland to prove herself according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 8 June 1916

An item dated London, England 7th reported that the purpose of the German fleet adventure was to satisfy the public opinion in Germany while more and more the people became angry about the British blockade and the non-activity of the German fleet.(1)

Note
1. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Moroccan patrol vessel OPV-70 Bir Anzarane (P341) 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Morocco-flagged, MMSI 242050000 and call sign CNKE. Steel made hull with aluminium superstructures. Ocean patrol vessel-70 designed byRaidco Marine Lorient, France and launched at STX France SA on 25 August 2010 and commissioned on 23 June 2011. Primarily build for patrolling in the Moroccan exclusive economic zone and fishery controlling in the Atlantic Ocean. Displacement 800 tons and as dimensions 70 x 11 x 3,35 metres. Horsepower 8,17 MW delivered by 2 Wärtsilä 12V26 diesel engines allowing a speed of 20 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 4.200 nautical miles and able to stay during 15 days on sea. Crew numbers 64 men. The armament consists of 1-7,6cm Otobreda gun, 1-4cm Bofors gun, 2-14,5mm machineguns and 2-12,7mm machineguns.

Polish reefer (ex-Del Monte Trader 1990-1993, Tundra Trader 1993-2004) Avila Star 2004-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 8713550, MMSI 636013070 and call sign A8KJ9. Ex-Del Monte Trader renamed December 1993 and Tundra Trader renamed June 2004. Gross tonnage 11.590 (international)-11.833,65 (Suez)-11.857,93 (Panama) tons, net tonnage 6.230 (international)-8.824,33 (Suez)-8.931,78 (Panama) tons, summer deadweight 12.519 tons with a draft of 9,01 metres and as dimensions 158,50 (over all) x 23 x7 metres. In 1990 built by Navantia Carenas Puerto Real, Puerto Real, Spain. Owned and managed by Star Reefers Poland, Gdynia, Poland.

Italian oil/chemical tanker Valle Bianca 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 June 2016

Italy-flagged, homeport Trieste, IMO 9387580, MMSI 247218600 and call sign ICEF. Owned and managed by Montanari Navigazione, Fano, Italy. Built by SPP Shipbuilding Tongyoung Shipyard, Tongyoung, South Korea in 2007.

Dutch handyzize dry bulkcarrier Hanze Genua 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 June 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Groningen, Netherlands. IMO 9746970, MMSI 244830401 and call sign PCZB. Built for account of and operated by Vlootfonds Hanzevast 3-ms Hanze Genua.

Russia congratulated England with the victory at the Battle of Jutland according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 9 June 1916

An item reported that the Russian minister Sazonoff send a telegram to the British minister of foreign affairs Earl Grey stating that he admired the bravery of the British fleet and condoled with the losses. The victory again proved the maritime superiority of England while the German fleet just fled without fighting back. Grey answered to be flattered with this words and remarked that the lives of the British sailors were not sacrificed in vain. Despite all efforts to conceal were the heavy losses of Germany well known.(1)

Note
1. Battle of Jutland or Skagerrak between the British and German navies 31 May-1 June 1916. British losses 6.094 men killed, 674 men wounded, l3 battle cruisers, 3 armoured cruisers, 8 destroyers total tonnage lost 113.300 tons and German losses 2.551 men killed, 507 wounded, 1 battle cruiser, 1 pre-dreadnought, 4 light cruisers, total tonnage 62.300 tons.

American naval shipbuilding program reduced according to the Dutch newspaper Het nieuws van den dag voor Nederlandsch-Indië dated 19 April 1919

Lexington-class

An item reported that the number of capital ships tot be built under the US 3 years naval program was reduced from 16 tot 10 ships caused by disagreeing experts about the value of battle cruisers.(1)  The naval commission in the House of Representatives approved the annual budget of 750 million including 169 million for new building. The costs of each of the 10 planned  battleships was 21 million and each of the 10 cruisers 8 million. A proposal dealing with the building of 130 smaller ships was yet not accepted until the department of navy decided with types were needed regarded the war experiences. The commission accepted the proposal of Daniels (2) to stop the building by the president of international treaties secured a world wide disarmament. (3)

Notes
1. Lexington-class consisting of the Lexington, Ranger, Constellation, Saratoga, Constitution and United States. Never completed as battle cruisers due to the limitations of the Naval Treaty of Washington of 1922. The Lexington and Saratoga were converted into aircraft carriers/ Designed as a response on the Japanese Kongo-class battle cruisers. General technical specifications. With a displacement of 44.200 tons/43.500 long tons-45.354 tons/44.638 long tons (deep load) were the dimensions 266,4 (over all) x 32,1 x 9,4 metres or 874 x 105.4 x 31 feet. The turbines and 16 water tube boilers supplied via 4 shafts 180.000 ship allowing a speed of 33 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 10.000 nautical miles. The crew was to number 1.297-1.326 (when used as flagship). The armour consisted of a 12,7-17,8cm/5-7” thick belt, a deck of 3,8-5,7cm/1.5-2,25”, with the barbettes, gun turrets and coning tower protected by respectively 12,7-22,9cm/5-7‘, 16,2cm/6” (sides)-27,9cm/11” (front) and 30,5cm/12”. The armament was to consist pf 4x2-40,6cm/16” guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” guns, 4x1-7,6cm/3” anti aircraft guns (to be increased with another 4) and 8-53,3cm/21” torpedo tubes.
2. Josephus Daniels (18 May 1862 Washington, North Carolina, USA-15 January 1948 Raleigh, North Carolina, USA). Secretary of navy 5 March 1913-4 March 1921, in 1933-1941 ambassador to Mexico.
3. The Washington Naval Treaty ratified 17 August 1923 signed between the five major naval powers at that moment (USA, United Kingdom, France, Italy and Japan) limited the numbers and displacement of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers to be kept and for the other ships like cruisers a maximum displacement of 10.000 tons and a maximum calibre of 8”. The London Naval Treaties of 1930 and 1936 modified the Washington Naval Treaty.

US House of Representatives approved large naval shipbuilding program according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 5 June 1916

An item reported that the US House of Representatives approved a bill for the building of 5 battle cruisers, 4 scout cruisers, 10 destroyers, 50 submarines and 130 aircraft.

British troop transport Manitou attacked by Turkish torpedo boat according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 19 April 1915

An item dated London, England 17th referred to a statement of the British Admiralty that the British troop transport Manitou was attacked that day by a Turkish torpedo boat in the Aegian Sea. The three torpedoes fired by the torpedo boat all missed and she fled chased by the cruiser Minerva and destroyers. Finally the torpedo boat stranded on the coast of Chios and was destroyed. Her crew was taken prisoner. Around 100 men on board of the transport drowned. A day later stated the admiralty that 24 men were drowned and 27 missing, probably due to two boats capsizing. The Manitou herself was undamaged.

German minelayer cruiser SMS Albatross interned in Sweden after stranding according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 5 July 1915

An item reported that after a fight with Russian cruisers the German minelayer Albatros stranded of Astorgearn. Of her crew were 21 men killed and 27 wounded who were interned in Sweden.(1)

Note
1. Minelayer cruiser of the Nautilus-class laid down at AG Weser, Bremen, Germany on 24 May 1907, launched on 23 October 1907, commissioned on 19 May 1908, deliberately stranded on the island of Gotland, Sweden, heavily damaged after a fight with Russian cruisers after lying a minefield of the Aland Islands on  2 July 1915, salvaged and interned the same month by the Swedish, returned to Germany in January 1919, stricken on 21 March 1921 and broken the same year.

German destroyer lost off Ostend, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item reported that the Germans conformed the loss of a destroyer off Ostend, Belgium. Part of her crew was rescued.

German submarine torpedoed Russian auxiliary cruiser according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 25 August 1915

An item reported that in the Finnish Gulf a German submarine torpedoed a Russian auxiliary cruiser.

German batteries damaged Russian torpedo boat in the Gulf of Riga according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 October 1915

An item dated Berlin, Germany 7th reported that German batteries in the Gulf of Riga damaged a Russian torpedo boat heavily.

Danish cabinet limited sale of merchant ships abroad according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 October 1915

An item dated Copenhagen, Denmark 7th reported that the Danish cabinet on the 6th announced that it was immediately forbidden to sale registered ships and ships with a temporarily Danish nationality certificate abroad.

Russia denied German version of the naval actions in the Baltic Sea according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 November 1915

An item dated Petrograd, Russia 7th responded on an article published by vice admiral Kirchhoff (1) in an American magazine dealing with the German Baltic squadron. Although Kirchhof was considered to be a naval expert in and outside Germany the Russians had remarks with the article. He claimed that after the fight between the Albatross (2) and Russian warships off the east coast of Gotland, Sweden the Russians despite being stronger in advance, fled when the German battleships which were far more powerful as their Russian equivalents entered the scene. This was far from the truth according to the Russian version while it was just the battleship Roon which arrived and refused the fight with the stronger Russian squadron. The Russians confirmed that German armoured cruisers were much powerful compared with the Russian, about 4 times stronger. In the beginning of the war were all German cruisers weaker as the Russian ones which as result concluded the Russian that they sent large cruisers and dreadnoughts to the Baltic Sea. This reinforcement was yet not arrived during the fight with the Albatros.

Notes
1. Hermann Kirchhoff (22 February 1851 Hanerau-25 August 1932, Strub, Oberbayern, Germany), naval officer and military historian. Author of the essay Einfluss der Seemacht auf der Geschichte der Ostseestaaten.
2. Minelayer cruiser of the Nautilus-class laid down at AG Weser, Bremen, Germany on 24 May 1907, launched on 23 October 1907, commissioned on 19 May 1908, deliberately stranded on the island of Gotland, Sweden, heavily damaged after a fight with Russian cruisers after lying a minefield of the Aland Islands on  2 July 1915, salvaged and interned the same month by the Swedish, returned to Germany in January 1919, stricken on 21 March 1921 and broken the same year.

Tuesday, 28 June 2016

Chinese car carrier Galveston Highway 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Panama-flagged, IMO 9675573, MMSI 353100000 and call sign 3FAJ5. Built at the Imabari Shipbuilding Marugame Yard, Marugame, Japan in 2014. Owned and managed by Northstar Shipmanagement, Hong Kong, China.

General cargo ship Marielle Bolten 1997-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9149653, MMSI 636090499 and call sign ELZH9. Owned and managed by Aug. Bolten Wm. Miller’s Nachfolger, Hamburg, Germany. Built at the Dalian Shipyard, Dalian, China in 1997.

Turkish oil/chemical tanker STI Comandante 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9686857, MMSI 538005398 and call sign V7DL6. owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Istanbul, Turkey. Built at the Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2014.

Singapore oil/chemical tanker Alpine Meadow 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9478688, MMSI 538003845 and call sign V7TO5. Owned by ST Shipping&Transport, Singapore and managed by Sea World Management&Trading, Athens, Greece, Built by SPP Shipbuilding Tongyoung Shipyard, Tongyoung, South Korea.

Polish reefer (ex-Costa Rican Star 1998, Hornwind 1998-2002) Costa Rican Star 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 June 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9150822, MMSI 636013073 and call sign A8KK4. Owned by Star Reefers Poland, Gdynia, Poland and managed by Star Reefers UK, London, England. Built at the Shikoku Dockyard, Takamatsu, Japan in 1998.

Dutch steam fishing vessel Zaanstroom IV released by Germans according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 15 December 1916

An item reported that the owners at Ijmuiden, Netherlands of the seized Dutch steam fishing vessel Zaanstroom IV a telegram received that she on Thursday morning at Cuxhaven, Germany was released and departed towards sea.

Many wounded German marines left Zeebrugge seeking refugee at Brugge, Belgium according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 29 March 1916

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 22nd reported that numerous wounded German marines coming from Zeebrugge, Belgium arrived at Brugge, Belgium escaping from the Allied bombardment, Some patrol vessels and destroyers also left Zeebruggge. Later towed one destroyer another into the harbour of Zeebrugge. A German submarine was sighted close under the Dutch coast.

German auxiliary cruiser Hermann attacked by Russian destroyers according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 16 June 1916

An item dated London, England 15th reported that south east of Stockholm, Sweden four Russian destroyers destroyed an auxiliary cruiser. A second item dated The Hague, Netherlands 14h reported that this was the German auxiliary cruiser Hermann but that her own crew scuttled her off Norrköping, Sweden. The major part of her crew included her commanding officer was rescued.

Wreckage belonging to a German warship washed up on the island Refshalem according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 30 October 1916

An item dated Copenhagen, Denmark 28th referred to the Danish magazine Ekstrabladet reporting that a large quantity of wreckage belonging to a German warship washed up on the beach of the island Refshalem.

Dutch government organized convoy system towards England according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 29 March 1916

An item dated Amsterdam, Netherlands 28th referred to an official statement of the Dutch cabinet reporting that as a service for the Dutch merchant shipping a vessel fitted with a wireless telegraphy device was stationed near the light ship Noord-Hinder and that the ships in convoys were to be escorted by tugs and minehunters to the British waters.

German torpedo boat sunk off Falster, Denmark according to the Dutch newspaper Rotterdamsch nieuwsblad dated 20 May 1916

An item Copenhagen, Denmark 18th referred to tidings received from Malmö reporting that a German torpedo boat off Falster entered a minefield and sunk. Except for one sailor was her crew rescued by another torpedo boat.

Russian torpedo boat sunk south of Varna, Bulgaria according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad 12 March 1916

An item dated Sofia, Bulgaria 10th reported that the day before a Russian torpedo boat hit a mine south of Varna and sunk. Bulgarian military rescued 4 officers and 11 sailors.

Monday, 27 June 2016

British armoured cruiser HMS Kent 1900-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Portsmouth Dockyard on 12 February 1900, launched on 6 March 1901, completed on 1 October 1903, destroyed in the Battle of the Falklands the German light cruiser SMS Nürnberg (1) on 8 December 1914, attacked with the HMS Glasgow (2) the German light cruiser SMS Dresden (3) in the Battle of the Chilean island Más a Tierra ending in her being scuttled in the Cumberland Bay (Robinso Crusoe Island, begin 1919 ordered to support at Vladivostok, Russia the so-called  Siberian Intervention during the civil war going on in Russia and at Hong Kong in March 1920 for sale to be broken up and finally sold on 20 June 1920. Building costs 700.283-733.940 pond sterling.

Notes
1. Königsberg-light cruiser, laid down at Howaldtswerke, Kiel, Germany in 1906, launched on 28 April 1906 and commissioned on 10 Aril 1908. Armament consisted of 10-10,5cm/4.1” quick firing guns and 2-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.
2. Dresden-class light cruiser, Laid down by Fairfield Shipbuilding&Engineering, Govan, Scotland on 25 March 1909, launched on 30 September 1909, commissioned in September 1910 and sold to be broken up in 29 April 1927. Armament consisted of 2x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XI guns, 10x1-10,2cm/4” breech loading Mk VII guns, 4-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd quick firing guns and 2-45,7cm/18” torpedo tubes.
3. Laid down at Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany in 1906, launched on 15 October 1907 and commissioned on 14 November 1908.Armament consisted of 10-10,4cm/4.1” quick firing L/40 guns, 8-5,2cm/2” quick firing L/55 guns and 2-45cm.17.7” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Cornwall 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at the Pembroke Dockyard on 11 March 1901, launched on 29 October 1902, completed on 1 December 1904, refitted to be used as cadet training ship, participated in the Battle of the Falklands Islands on 8 December 1914, cadet training ship in 1919, paid of on 21 August 1919 and sold to be broken up on 7 June 1920. Building costs 756.274-789.421 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Berwick 1901-1920 (1922)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by W. Beardmore&Company on 19 April 1901, launched on 20 September 1902, completed on 9 December 1903, refitted in 1908-1909, paid off in 1919, sold to be broken up on 1 July 1920 which was executed in Germany in 1922. Building costs 750,984-776.868 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Donegal 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by Fairfield, Govan, Scotland on 14 February 1901, launched on 4 September 1902, commissioned on 5 November 1903 and sol to be broken up on 1 July 1920. Building costs 715.497-752.964 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Cumberland 1901-1921 (1923)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down by London&Glasgow Shipping Company, Glasgow, Scotland on 19 February 1901, launched on 16 December 1902, completed on 1 December 1904, refitted in 1907-1908, training ship in 1908, paid off at Queenstown, Ireland in April 1920, sold to be broken up on 9 May 1921 which was executed at Briton Ferry, Wales, England in 1923. Building costs 817.168-751.508 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Lancaster 1901-1920

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Armstrong, Elswick, England on 4 March 1901, launched on 22 March 1903, completed on 5 April 1904, added to the reserve in 1912, recommissioned in 1913, sold to be broken up on 3 March 1920 which was executed at Blyth, England. Building costs 732.858-763,084 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Suffolk 1901-1920 (1922)

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Portsmouth Dockyard on 25 March 1901, launched on 15 January 1903, completed on 21 May 1904, refitted in 1909, refitted in 1912, cadet training ship in 1919, on the sale list in April 1920, sold to be broken up on 1 July 1920 which was executed in Germany in 1922. Building costs 722,-681-783.054 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

British armoured cruiser HMS Essex 1900-1921

Drake-class

Monmouth-class

Devonshire-class

Laid down at Pembroke Dockyard on 1 January 1900, launched on 29 August 1901, completed on 22 March 1904, added to the reserve in March 1906, decommissioned in September 1909, refitted in 1913, paid off in August 1916, decommissioned becoming destroyer depot ship at Devonport, England in 1916, accommodation ship in April 1918 at Devonport, training ship 1 December 1918, again accommodation ship around 1 May 1919, paid off in October 1919 and sold to be broken up on 8 November 1921 which was executed in Germany. Building costs 736,557-770,325 pond sterling. Of the Monmouth-class also called County-class, built to act against light cruisers and armed merchant ships consisting of the Monmouth, Bedford, Essex, Kent, Berwick, Cornwall, Cumberland. Donegal, Lancaster and Suffolk. Preceded by the Drake-class and succeeded by the Devonshire-class. General technical specifications. Displacement 10.000 (normal) and as dimensions 141,3 (over all) x 20,1 x 7,6 metres or 463.6 x 66 x 25 feet. Horsepower of 22.000 ihp supplied by 2-4 cylinder triple expansion steam engines and 31 water tube -boilers allowing a speed of 23 knots. Their crew numbered 678 men. The armour consisted of a 5,1-10,2cm/2-4” thick deck, 1,9-5,1cm/0.75-2” thick decks, 12,7cm/5” thick bulkheads with the gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 13c,/5” and 25,4cm/10”.  The armament consisted of 2x1+10x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading MkVII guns, 10x1-7,6cm/3”/12pd quick firing 12 cwt guns, 34,7cm/3pd quick firing Hotchkiss guns and 2x1-45cm/18” torpedo tubes.