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Wednesday, 26 April 2017

Double screw Dutch tug Viking 2008-



Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 12 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9431903, MMSI 245039000 and callsign PIHD. Gross tonnage 332 tons, summer deadweight 235 tons and as dimensions 27,67 (between perpendiculars)-30,80 (over all) x 10,50 x 3,75 (construction)-4,10 metres, Built in 2008 at the Scheepswerf Gebroeders Kooiman, Zwijndrecht, Netherlands. Owned by Koerts International Towing Service (KITS) at Delfzijl. 

Two British battle cruisers available for actions around Norway according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 9 May 1940

HMS Repulse




HMS Renown
With our thanks for allowing us to publish!

An item dated London, England 9th reported that after Churchill in the House of Commons a day earlier stated that the British had just two battle cruisers was the Admiralty asked if this was correct. The statement was in so far correct that there were 2 battle cruisers available for the operations around Norway. Totally served within the British Royal Navy three of this kind, namely the Repulse, Renown (2) and Hood.(3)

Notes
1. Battle cruiser of the Renown-class, originally designed as a Revenge-class battleship. Laid down by John Brown and Company, Clydebank, Scotland on 25 January 1915, launched on 8 January 1916, commissioned on 18 August 1916 and sunk by Japanese aircraft off Kuantan, South Chinese Sea on 10 December 1941. She participated in the so-called Norwegian Campaign between April-June 1940
2. Battle cruiser of the Renown-class, originally designed as a Revenge-class battleship. Laid down 25 January 1915 of the shipyard of Fairfield, Govan, Scotland was she stricken in 1948 and sold to be broken up. She participated in the so-called Norwegian Campaign between April-June 1940.
3. Nicknamed Mighty Hood. Pennant 51. Her building at the shipyard of John Brown&Company was ordered on 7 April 1916, laid down on 1 September, launched on 22 August 1918, commissioned on 15 May 1920 as world largest warship, sunk on 24 May 1941 during her battle with the German battleship Bismarck. The only one of the four projected Admiral class battle cruisers caused by an insufficient design despite the modifications after the Battle of Jutland (31 May-1 June 1916). 

American squadron battleships planning a visit to France, England, Netherlands, Belgium and Gibraltar according to the Dutch newspaper De Gooi- en Eemlander dated 7 June 1924

An item dated Annapolis, USA 7th reported that in the summer an American squadron of battleships intended to visit the harbours of Torbay (England), Brest (France), Rotterdam (Netherlands), Antwerp (Belgium) and Gibraltar. 

American battleships USS Wyoming and Arkansas lying in Rotterdam, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Nieuwe Rotterdamsche Courant dated 21 July 1924


Wyoming-class

An item reported that several thousand people visited the American battleships Wyoming (1) and Arkansas (2) lying in Rotterdam, Netherlands.

Notes
1. Laid down at William Cramp&Sons, Philadelphia, USA on 9 February 1910, launched by Dorothy Eunice Knight on 25 May 1911, commissioned on 25 September 1912, converted into a training ship between 1931-1932, gunnery training ship since November 1941, decommissioned on 1 August 1947, stricken on 16 September 1947 and sold to be broken up on 30 October 1947 which was executed by Lipsett Incorporated at Newark after her arrival at New York on 5 December 1947. Of the Wyoming-class with as sister ship Arkansas (BB-33), preceded by the Florida-class and succeeded by the New York-class.
2. Laid down at New York Shipbuilding Corporation on 25 January 1910, launched by Mary Louise Macon on 14 January 1911, commissioned on 17 September 1912, sunk as part of the Operation Crosssroads (nuclear weapon test) at the Bikini Atol on 25 July 1946, decommissioned on 29 July 1946 and stricken on 15 August 1946. Of the Wyoming-class with as sister ship Arkansas (BB-33), preceded by the Florida-class and succeeded by the New York-class. 

Italian king Victor Emmanuel against building too large warships according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 19 August 1910

An item referred to the Mattino in which magazine Stead (1) told that he 3 years spoke with the Italian king Victor Emmanuel who was with no doubt against the building of too large ships which were potential victims of aircrafts. The building of dreadnoughts was a large mistake he stated, how larger the target the greater the chance on a hit. An insignificant plane of just 10.000 lires could simply destroy a battleship of 55 milion lires with the 75 kilo melinite in bombs she could carry with her.

Notes
1. The British journalist/newspaper editor William Thomas Stead (5 July 1849 Embleton, Northumberland, England-15 April 1912 steamship Titanic)?
2. Vittorio Emanuele Ferdinando Maria Gennaro Savoy(11 November 1869 Naples, Kingdon of Italy-28 December 1947 Alexandria, Egypt), reigned as king of Italy between 29 July 1900-9 may 1946 as Victor Emmanuel III. 

Sailors of the American battleship USS New Hampshire when returning from leave according to the Dutch newspaper De Volksvriend dated 6 October 2010

Connecticut-class

An item reported that a tender with sailors returning from leave capsized while underway towards their ship the USS New Hampshire lying in the North River off New York.(1) The tender was overcrowded with the more as 100 sailors when she capsized caused by the swell of a passing steamship. There were still no bodies found but an board of the ship were 28 men missing.

Note
1. Of the Connecticut-class consisting Connecticut, Louisiana, Kansas, New Hampshire, Minnesota and Vermont, preceded by the Virginia-class and succeeded by the Mississippi-class. Ordered on 27 April 1904, laid down at New York Shipbuilding Corporation by Hazel E. Mclane on 1 May 1905, launched on 30 June 1906, commissioned on 19 March 1908, overhauled in 1919, used for training midshipmen in 1920, decommissioned on 21 May 1921 and sold on 1 November 1923 to be broken up. 

American battleship USS Delaware launched according to the Dutch newspaper De Volksvriend dated 14 April 1910


An item reported that the US Navy was serious strengthened with her first dreadnought the USS Delaware, fitted out at the navy yard at Norfolk, Virginia. She was her largest ship and even 5.000 tons larger as the 16.000 tons measuring USS Michigan. Her crew numbered 917 men and the main armament consisted of 12” guns. As commanding officer was captain Charles A. Gove appointed, earlier commanding officer of the navy academy at Annapolis, USA.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Newport New Shipbuilding, Newport News, USA on 11 November 1907, launched on 6 February 1909, commissioned on 4 April 1910, decommissioned caused by the Washington Naval Treaty at the Boston Navy Yard on 10 November 1923, disarmed and sold to be broken up on 5 February 1924. Part of the Delaware-class consisting of the Delaware and North Dakota preceded by the South Carolina-class and succeeded by the Florida-class.

US cabinet wanted to salvage sunken armoured cruiser USS Maine according to the Dutch newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 17 October 1910

An item reported that the president Taft approved the plans to salvage the in 1898 in the harbour of Havana, Cuba sunk American battleship USS Maine.(1) The operation was to be completed before 15 February 1911 and supervised by a military engineering officer. The Spanish cabinet was invited to sent a representative to the salvage with as purpose that Spain and the USA would agree what if the explosion causing the sinking of the ship was internal or external.

Note
1. ACR-1. Building ordered on 3 August 1886, laid down at the New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, New York, USA on 17 October 1888, launched on 18 November 1889, sponsored by Alice Tracy Wilmerding, commissioned on 17 September 1895 and finally sunk after an explosion while ling in the harbour of Havana, Cuba on 15 February 1898. The wreck was scuttled in the Strait of Florida on 16 March 1912. Building costs 4.677.788,75. Her loss was of the reasons which caused the war between the USA and Spain(25 April-12 August 1898). Succeeded by the USS New York. 

Russian battleship Slava could attend celebrations due to machinery problems according to the Dutch newspaper Provinciale Drentsche en Asser courant dated 25 October 1910


An item reported that the commanding officer of the Russian battleship Slava was to appear for the court martial accused of negligence. The Slava was in September to be present at the celebrations at Montenegro. She stayed behind at Gibraltar while her machinery refused and the boilers appeared to be burned. Immediately was a thorough examination ordered.(1)

Note
1. Of the Borodino-class. Building ordered on 30 January 1900, laid down at the Baltic Shipyard, Saint Petersburg, Russia on 1 November 1902, launched on 29 August 1930, commissioned in October 1905, participated not in the Russo-Japanese war due to late delivery, used as training ship for new officers after 1906, added to the Baltic Fleet after 1910, grounded in the Moon Sound Strait near the island of Muhu while she -being heavily damaged by the German SMS König- could not escape from the German naval forces and sunk by Russian destroyers on 17 October 1917, stricken from the Navy List on 29 May 1918 and broken up by Estonian inhabitants in 1935. 

Tuesday, 25 April 2017

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Gnevnyi 1935-1941

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

Laid down at the Zhdanov Yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 501 on 27 November 1935, launched on 13 July 1936, commissioned on 30 October 1938 and sunk after hitting mines in the so-called German minefield Apolda on 23 June 1941. Part of the Baltic Fleet.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges. 

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Grozyashchii 1936-1950s

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

Laid down at the Zhdanov yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 513 on 18 August 1936, launched on 4 January 1937, completed at Shipyard 189 with yard number 301, commissioned on 17 September 1939 and broken up in the 1950s. Part of the Baltic Fleet. Built under the 2nd Five-Year Plan.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges. 

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Grozny 1936-1957

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

Laid down at the Zhdanov yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 502 on 31 July 1936, launched on 21 December 1935m commissioned on 9 December 1938, transferred via the Baltic-White Sea canal between 1939-1940 and added to the Northern Fleet and sunk while used as target for nuclear experiments off Nova Zembla in 1957. Part of the Baltic Fleet. Built under the 2nd Five-Year Plan.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges. 

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Gordyi 1935-1950s

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

Laid down at the Baltic Yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 514 on 25 June 1935, launched on 10 June 1937, commissioned on 23 December 1938, added to the Northern Fleet in 1941, broken up in 1950s. Part of the Baltic Fleet.Built under the 2nd Five-Year Plan.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges. 

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Gromkii 1936-1960

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

Laid down at the Baltic Yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 503 on 29 April 1936, launched on 6 December 1936, commissioned on 31 December 1938, transferred via the Baltic-White Sea canal between 1939-1940 and added to the Northern Fleet, broken up in 1960. Part of the Baltic Fleet. Built under the 2nd Five-Year Plan.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges. 

Russian (Project 7) destroyer Gremyashchiy 1936-1957

Gnevny-class


Storizhevoi-class variants

L laid down at the Zhdanov yard, St. Petersburg, Russia with yard number 515 on 23 July 1936, launched on12 August 1937, commissioned on 12 August 1938, transferred via the Baltic-White Sea canal between 1939-1940 and added to the Northern Fleet and sunk while used as target for nuclear experiments off Nova Zembla in 1957. Part of the Baltic Fleet. Built under the 2nd Five-Year Plan.

Project 7. Gnevny-class sometimes also referred to as the Gremyashchiy-class. P.O. Trakhtenberg of the Central Design Bureau headed by A.V. Nikitin used for this class the Italian destroyer Alfredo Oriani design and with comparable shortcomings like structural weakness and lacking sufficient seaworthiness in all weather conditions. To solve those shortcomings was chosen to stop further building of the Type 7 and to continue with the modified Type7U design or Storizhevoi-class (some times also called Soobrazitelnyy-class). Of the 36 planned units was the building of 6 cancelled.

General technical class details. With a displacement of 1.612 (standard)-2.039 (full load) and as dimensions 112,8 x 10,2 x 4,8 metres or 370.1 x 33.6 x 15.9 feet. The machinery consisted of 2-shaft GTZA-24 geared steam turbines and 3 water tube boilers supplying 50.500 shp during trials resulting in a speed of 39,37 knots (trials) and with a speed of 19,82 knots in a range of 2.640 nautical miles. Crew numbered 197 (peace)-236 (war). The armament consisted of 4x1-13cm/5.1” B-13 guns, 2x1-7,62cm/3” 34-K anti aircraft guns, 2x1-12,7mm/0.50” DK or DShK machineguns, 3x3-53,3cm/21.0” torpedo tubes, 60-95 mines and 25 depth charges.

British bark Romanoff arrived in Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-bode dated 17 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 17th reported the arrival of the British ship Romanoff master Datty coming from New York, USA, shipping agents B. van Leeuwen&Co.(1)

Note
1, Bark, master W. Doty, call sign RCFM, tonnage 1.050 tons, dimensions 175 x 37.4 x 22 feet, built by P.&R. Young, Shelburne, N.S in 1876 and owned by A.F. Stoneman&Company. 

Dutch East Indies steamship Gouverneur-Generaal Loudon cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper dated 5 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 5th reported the departure of the Dutch East Indies steamship G.G. Loudon master Preusner towards Muntok and Palembang, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Gouverneur-Generaal Loudon, call sign TDLS, homeport Batavia, horsepower 190 hp and net capacity 2.434,10 cubic metres/860,10 tons of 2,83 cubic metres. 

German bark Marie B. Kohrsch underway from the Dutch East Indies towards USA according to the Dutch newspaper dated 11 June 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 8th reported the departure of the German bark Marie B. Kohrsch towards New York, USA.

Note
1, Master C. Dade, call sign MDKC, built by E, Burchard, Rostock, Germany in 1882, owned Aug. Burchard, tonnage 546 tons and as dimensions 139.8 x 39.9 x 18.5 feet. 

The numbers of warships of the US Navy in actual service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I. dated November 1934 reporting that the US Navy budget 1934-1935 reported that to be kept in service were 14 battleships, 15 heavy cruisers, 10 light cruisers, 72 destroyers, 54 submarines, 4 aircraft carriers, 5 minelayers and 1 air ship. Together with smaller ships and vessels like minesweepers, auxiliary ships and the coast guard were 306 ships and vessels available. 

The new Japanese cruisers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1923

An item reported that the new Japanese 10.000 cruisers probably were to be armed with 4x2-20,5cm/8” guns, a large 10,2cm/4” anti aircraft armament, 4 planes and a speed of around 34 miles. 

French navy wanted to use complete tonnage as allowed by Washington Naval Treaty according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1923

An item reported that the new French Fleet Law demanded the maximum tonnage which was permitted by the Washington Naval Conference (2) namely 177.000 tons for battleships and 61.000 tons for aircraft carriers, a large number of submarines but none cruisers. The half of the surface units would be continuous crewed and 3/5 of the submarines.

Note
1. Result of the Washington Naval Conference between November 1921-February 1922 was the Washington Naval Treaty signed by USA, England, Japan, Italy and France to limit the building of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers and to limit the possession of such capital ships by stopping completion of breaking up already existing. 

US Navy numbered more battleships than Royal British Navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1923

An item reported that as a result of the Washington Naval Conference (1) England already on 31 December 1933 had stricken 16 battleships and cruisers. Just the Lion was to follow this fate. A result was that with the remaining 23 capital ships the British battle fleet counted 3 dreadnoughts fewer than the American battle fleet.

Note
1. Result of the Washington Naval Conference between November 1921-February 1922 was the Washington Naval Treaty signed by USA, England, Japan, Italy and France to limit the building of battleships, battle cruisers and aircraft carriers and to limit the possession of such capital ships by stopping completion of breaking up already existing. 

American battleship US Texas fitted out with anti aircraft armament according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1916-1917 no. 8

New York-class



An item reported that above the fixed part of the boat crane on board of the American battleship USS Texas a platform was made for placing anti aircraft guns on 12 metres height above the water level.(1)

Note
1. Part of the New York-class consisting of the New York and the Texas, preceded by the Wyoming-class and succeeded by the Nevada-class. Building ordered on 24 June 1910, laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding on 17 April 1911, launched on 18 May 1912, sponsored by Claudia Lyon, commissioned on 12 March 1914, overhauled between 31 July 1925-23 November 1926, decommissioned on 21 April 1948, stricken on 30 April 1948 and now museum ship. Building costs 11.179.195 US dollars. 

Monday, 24 April 2017

Polish reefer Cote d’Ivorian Star 1998-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9172478, MMSI 636014241 and call sign A8SL4. Built by Shikoku Dockyard, Takamatsu, Japan in 1998. Owned and managed by Star Reefers Poland, Gdynia, Poland. 

Greek container ship Cap San Artemissio 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9633939, MMSI 564387000 and call sign 9V2238. Owned and managed by Enesel, Athens, Greece. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2014. 

Dutch general cargo ship Eems Servant 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9559602, MMSI 246236000 and call sign PBTI. Owned and managed by Kornet&Zonen, Werkendam, Netherlands. Built by 189 Shipbuilding, Haiphong, Vietnam in 2010.

French container ship (ex-Hansa Sonderburg 2003, Durande 2003, Delmas Forbin 2003-2006, Marfret Durande 2006-2012, BG Freight Iberia 2012-2013) Durande 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Luxembourg-flagged, IMO 9256365, MMSI 253201000 and call sign LXDU. According to maritime connector built by Wenchong Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2003. Owned and managed by Marfret, Marseille, France, France-flagged, homeport Marseille and MMSI 226320000. Ex-Hansa Sonderburg renamed 2003, Durande renamed May 2003, Delmas Forbin renamed November 2006, Marfret Durande renamed August 2012 and BG Freight Iberia renamed October 2013. 

German general cargo ship Theseus 2000-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John;s, IMO 9199256, MMSI 304011027 and call sign V2OU. Built by Vard Tulcea, Tulcea, Romania in 2000. Owned and managed by Sunship Schiffartkontor, Emden, Germany. 

Liberian container ship (ex-Aristoklis 2015) Maersk Sarat 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 11 April 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, Liberia, IMO 9732591, MMSI 636017102 and call sign D5JH6. Built by Hundai Samho Heavy Inudstries, Samho, South Korea as Hyundai Samho 572 for account of Containers Carriers Corporation (Captial Ship Management Corporation) te Monrovia by on 27 November 2015 delivered as the Maersk Sarat to SFL Sarat Incorporation (Bernhard Schulte Singapore Pte. Ltd.), Monrovia, Liberia.

The Argentinean naval program according to a letter dated 18 November 1908 received by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 18 November 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that the Argentine program consisted of one very fast armoured cruiser with a value of 17.182.000 US dollars, 4 destroyers 1st class with a total value of 4.581.819 US dollars , 8 destroyers 1st class with a total value of 5.498.182 US dollars and a floating battery with a value of 6.818.082 US dollars. It seems as if the Argentinean government intended to pay in promissory notes. The Senate still did not approve the program but the Argentine naval commission at London, England was very interested in the large British shipyards. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Note
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde supplied delivery times for submarines and torpedo boats responding on a letter dated 12 September 1908 received from her South-American representative


The first Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O-1 built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 12 September 1908 asked Van Leeuwen (1) the shipyard what the delivery time was for torpedo boats and submarines.(2) The preliminary program passed the Chamber of Representatives and was now discussed by the Senate [of Argntina]. The shipyard responded that it was possible to deliver 2 torpedo boats one year of approval of the plans and 1 submarine within 1,5 years. If the order was larger, was it possible to speed up the schedule and a second delivery possible within 3-4 months after the first. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. The first submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-1, laid down on 1 June 1904, in the thrushes in September 1904, plates in February 1905, launched on 8 July 1905 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 20 December 1906. Displacement 10,5 (surfaced)-124,5 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 20,421 x 3,561 x 3,891 (hold) x 2,79 (draught) metres. Armament consisted of 1-45cm bow torpedo tube for which she carried 3-45cm torpedoes with her. Crew numbered 12 men. Speed 8,35 (surfaced)-7 (submerged) miles. Holland/Electric Boat Company design.The second submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-2, laid down 11 October 1909, , launched on 30 January 1911, official trial on 3 October 1911 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 10 November 1911. Building within 29 months. Displacement 133,974 (surfaced)-149,410 tons (submerged) and as dimensions 29,914 (between perpendiculars()32,35 (overall) x 3,048 x 3,453 (hold) x 2,726 (draught) metres or 98.1-96.2 x 1-.0 x 11.4 x 9.11,25 feet. Crew numbered 10 men. Armament consisted of 2-45cm bow torpedo tubes (above each other) for which she carried 4 torpedoes and 1 machinegun. Speed 11,1 (surfaced)-8,66 submerged) miles. Whitehead-Hay design.

The last torpedo boat built by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Dutch shipyards should cooperate for obtaining naval orders in South America in 1908

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 29 July 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen to the shipyard that also the Dutch shipyards Nederlandsche Scheepsbouw Maatschappij (represented by J.P. Bredius) and Fijenoord were interested in obtaining orders for torpedo boats and so on. He suggested that it was perhaps a good idea if the Dutch shipyards combined their efforts against the concurrency. Argentine was also planning to increase her fleet after the huge orders form the Brazilian navy in England. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines. 

Note
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands. 

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Uruguay interested in purchasing torpedo boats and a submarine according to a letter dated 9 July 1908 received by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde


The first Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O-1 built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 9 July 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that Uruguay with a well filled government cash was considering the purchased of torpedo boats and even a submarine. This was to be the first submarine in South American service.(2) The German shipyard Vulkan already sent an offer for the torpedo boats. Van Leeuwen also referred to the torpedo cruiser earlier built by the same shipyard for Uruguay. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. The first submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-1, laid down on 1 June 1904, in the thrushes in September 1904, plates in February 1905, launched on 8 July 1905 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 20 December 1906. Displacement 10,5 (surfaced)-124,5 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 20,421 x 3,561 x 3,891 (hold) x 2,79 (draught) metres. Armament consisted of 1-45cm bow torpedo tube for which she carried 3-45cm torpedoes with her. Crew numbered 12 men. Speed 8,35 (surfaced)-7 (submerged) miles. Holland/Electric Boat Company design. The second submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-2, laid down 11 October 1909, launched on 30 January 1911, official trial on 3 October 1911 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 10 November 1911. Building within 29 months. Displacement 133,974 (surfaced)-149,410 tons (submerged) and as dimensions 29,914 (between perpendiculars()32,35 (overall) x 3,048 x 3,453 (hold) x 2,726 (draught) metres or 98.1-96.2 x 1-.0 x 11.4 x 9.11,25 feet. Crew numbered 10 men. Armament consisted of 2-45cm bow torpedo tubes (above each other) for which she carried 4 torpedoes and 1 machinegun. Speed 11,1 (surfaced)-8,66 submerged) miles. Whitehead-Hay design.

The last torpedo boat built by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

The Argentinean naval program according to a letter dated 16 June 1908 received by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 16th June 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that the Argentine project for the defence of the Rio de la Plata probably would consist of 10 very fast 600 tons seagoing torpedo boats with a combat area as large as possible and 20 smaller torpedo boats for inland service.(2) The cabinet was to ask the Chamber of Representatives and the Senate for a budget of 3 million pond sterling. The department of navy received a tender for 6 torpedo boats built using the designs of a well known British firm and which now almost were completed by an Italian shipyard. With a displacement of 380 tons was the speed 29 knots. The tender however would not be accepted as Van Leeuwen believed while their combat area was very limited and the fact that the boats were built without supervision of the Argentinean authorities. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines. 

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands. 
2. There is an undated scratch in pencil writing available which mentioned that the building costs of a large model torpedo boat were ƒ 65.000 included 5-0,45cm torpedoes, 3 torpedo guns and 2-5cm quick firing Krupp guns. Building costs of a small model torpedo boat were ƒ 48.000 included torpedoes and 2-3,7cm quick firing guns. The last torpedo boat built by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

German shipyard Schichau very dangerous concurrent for delivering torpedo boats by the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde according to a letter dated 13 June 1908

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 13th June 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard referring to his letter dated 10th that he departed towards the same evening towards Montevideo, Uruguay. He was accompanied by Mr. G. Zaayer known by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde as Zaayer claimed. For an eventual delivery of torpedo boats to Argentine was that a big advantage regarded the knowledge of Zaayer of this subject.(2) At the same time warned Van Leeuwen that also the Dutch shipyards Fijenoord, Nederlandsche Scheepsbouwmaatschappij and Smulders (what later became Gusto) were probably interested in delivering torpedo boats. While these firms hardly delivered such material, was the well experienced shipyard Schichau, Elbing, Germany a serious concurrent. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. The last torpedo boat built by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Argentinean cabinet asked Chamber of Representatives for budget for naval program according to a letter dated 16 May 1908 received by Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 16th May 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that on next Monday or Tuesday the minister of navy would present the Chamber a program(2)  for purchasing mainly torpedo boats and coastal defence vessels. As soon as more details became known, he would inform the Dutch shipyard. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines. 

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands. 
2. Probably the Argentinean government which came in those days with an extensive program including torpedo boats. The last torpedo boat built by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Possible private order for building submarine for Argentina by Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde according to a letter dated 28 April 1908


The first Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O-1 built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 28th April 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that he investigated the possibilities of delivering a submarine to Argentine. There was indeed a possibility on a private order. Van Leeuwen urgently asked again to send drawings and specifications dealing with submarines and torpedo boats.(2) Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. The first submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-1, laid down on 1 June 1904, in the thrushes in September 1904, plates in February 1905, launched on 8 July 1905 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 20 December 1906. Displacement 10,5 (surfaced)-124,5 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 20,421 x 3,561 x 3,891 (hold) x 2,79 (draught) metres. Armament consisted of 1-45cm bow torpedo tube for which she carried 3-45cm torpedoes with her. Crew numbered 12 men. Speed 8,35 (surfaced)-7 (submerged) miles. Holland/Electric Boat Company design. The second submarine was the Hr. Ms. O-2, laid down 11 October 1909, launched on 30 January 1911, official trial on 3 October 1911 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 10 November 1911. Building within 29 months. Displacement 133,974 (surfaced)-149,410 tons (submerged) and as dimensions 29,914 (between perpendiculars()32,35 (overall) x 3,048 x 3,453 (hold) x 2,726 (draught) metres or 98.1-96.2 x 1-.0 x 11.4 x 9.11,25 feet. Crew numbered 10 men. Armament consisted of 2-45cm bow torpedo tubes (above each other) for which she carried 4 torpedoes and 1 machinegun. Speed 11,1 (surfaced)-8,66 submerged) miles. Whitehead-Hay design. The last torpedo boat she was built  was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde asked for more details about submarines and torpedo boats they were able to built according to a letter dated 20 April 1908


The first Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. O-1 built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

The newest Dutch torpedo boat Hr. Ms. Zeeslang built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde

On 20th April 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that without more specified details about the building of torpedo boats and submarines it was impossible to represent the shipyard with success.(2) Van Leeuwen expected to get a letter of the shipyard dealing with a delivery to Uruguay so he could use his influence via his friends on the Uruguayan government. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. The first submarine built by this shipyard was the Hr. Ms. O-1, laid down on 1 June 1904, in the thrushes in September 1904, plates in February 1905, launched on 8 July 1905 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 20 December 1906. Displacement 10,5 (surfaced)-124,5 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 20,421 x 3,561 x 3,891 (hold) x 2,79 (draught) metres. Armament consisted of 1-45cm bow torpedo tube for which she carried 3-45cm torpedoes with her. Crew numbered 12 men. Speed 8,35 (surfaced)-7 (submerged) miles. Holland/Electric Boat Company design. The second submarine was the Hr. Ms. O-2, laid down 11 October 1909, launched on 30 January 1911, official trial on 3 October 1911 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 10 November 1911. Building within 29 months. Displacement 133,974 (surfaced)-149,410 tons (submerged) and as dimensions 29,914 (between perpendiculars()32,35 (overall) x 3,048 x 3,453 (hold) x 2,726 (draught) metres or 98.1-96.2 x 1-.0 x 11.4 x 9.11,25 feet. Crew numbered 10 men. Armament consisted of 2-45cm bow torpedo tubes (above each other) for which she carried 4 torpedoes and 1 machinegun. Speed 11,1 (surfaced)-8,66 submerged) miles. Whitehead-Hay design. The last torpedo boat she was built  was the Hr.Ms. Zeeslang on account of the Dutch Department of Colonies to serve in the Dutch East Indies. Displacement 89,32 tons and as dimensions 39,632 x 4,124 x 2,514 (hold) x 1,155-2,06 (draught) metres or 130.0 x 13.6,25 x 8.3 x 3.9,5-6.9 1/8  feet. Laid down on 15 November 1906, in the thrushes on 31 January 1907, launched on 27 April 1907 and handed over to the Royal Netherlands Navy on 6 July 1907. Speed 24,048 miles. Armament consisted of 2-3,7cm guns, 1 torpedo tube and 1 torpedo gun. Crew numbered 20 men.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde only interested in delivering torpedo boats and submarines according to letter dated 29 January 1908

On 31st March 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) that he received a letter dated 5th March and that he was very disappointed when he read that the shipyard in 1908 only was interested in building torpedo boats or submarines. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Note
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.

Source
Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde 1875-1960 (Municipality Archive Vlissingen) T. 214.258. 

Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde interested in delivering torpedo boats for Uruguay according to letter dated 29 January 1908

Torpedo cruiser Uruguay

On 29 January 1908 wrote Van Leeuwen (1) to the shipyard that he was pleased with the letter dated 3rd in which he was appointed as representative for the shipyard in Argentina, Paraguay and Uruguay.  He referred to an earlier letter in which he claimed to have contacted an influential person in the Uruguay cabinet for a possible delivery of torpedo boats. While Van Leeuwen heard that the shipyard in the meantime already was negotiating (2), asked he in which stage the talks were to prevent a chaos when two parties were working at the same time at the same project. Despite all efforts the Kon. Mij. De Schelde never succeeded in obtaining orders in South-America for building torpedo boats and/or submarines.

Notes
1. W. van Leeuwen&Co., Buenos Aires, Argentina, representatives of the Dutch shipyard Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands.
2. Probably is referred here to the torpedo cruiser Uruguay, which order despite the fact that the Dutch shipyard was among the cheapest was given to the German shipyard Vulkan. See on http://warshipsresearch.blogspot.nl/2012/11/tender-of-dutch-shipyard-konmij-de.html