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Monday, 30 May 2016

Argentinean destroyer La Plata performed well during her trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 8

An item reported that on Wednesday 20th November the at the German Schichau shipyard built Argentinean destroyer La Plata performed the 6 hours full speed trial at sea off Danzig. The wind speed was 3-4 with a quite heavy sea. The destroyer was completely fitted out with armament and full filled coal bunkers and a displacement of 1.160 tons. With well working and vibrations free engines was the medium speed 34,7 miles and during quite what time was the maximum speed even 36,8 miles.(1)

Note
1. Laid down in 1910, launched in January 1911, completed in March 1912 and stricken in January 1956.

Japanese cruiser 2nd class Hirado launched at Kobe, Japan according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 5

An item reported the launching of the Japanese cruiser 2nd class Hirado on 29th June at Kobe. With a displacement of 5.000 ton and a horsepower of 22.500 hp was her speed 26 miles. The main armament consisted of 6-15,24 cm guns.(1)

Note
1. Protected cruiser of the Chikuma-class, laid down under 1907 Fiscal Year by the Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corporation, Kobe, Japan on 10 August 1910, launched on 29 June 1911, commissioned on 17 June 1912, stricken on 1 April 1940 and broken up in 1947. In contrary to the item was she armed with 8-15,24cm guns.

French navy again ask for paying attention to the circulars dealing with submarines in waters where merchant ships were active according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 5

An item reported that the French minister of navy again pointed out to the circulars dated 5 July 1910 and 22 March 1911 dealing with the protection of submarines while executing exercises. On 22 March 1911 was ordered that the target ship for the submarines was to have a red flag in top. This ship was responsible to warn approaching merchant ships with the international signal MN (immediately stop). A launch or little vessel was to added to the target to bring the order or instructions to the merchant ship. One preventive measure was to exercise outside the common merchant routes. Further more was a policy developed in which for certain sectors near the main French harbours it was not allowed for submarines to move while submerged and merchant ships advised to use these sectors.

Royal British Navy testing frangibility of submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1911-1912 no. 5

An item reported that the Royal British Navy was testing frangibility of submarines for gunfire. For this purpose was the HMS A1 used on which was fired with lyddite filled shells while she was submerged to a depth of 2,5-3 metres. The result was that she sunk and was to be raised. From there she was first towed to shallow water for a preliminary examination and from there to the dock at Portsmouth, England.(1)

Note
1, Laid down by Vickers, Barrow-in-Furness, England on 19 February 1902, launched on 9 July 1902, sunk during the tests but despite what the item suggested she was not salvaged while she could not be find back until 1989!

An Italian monitor-design as alternative for a Dutch dreadnought according to the Dutch magazine Wetenschappelijke bladen dated 1912 deel 1 no. 2


An item dealing with the by the Dutch minister of navy proposed battleship mentioned that it was far from easy to come with an advice how to handle this issue regarded the available budget and the necessity of defending the Netherlands and the colonies. For this purpose published this magazine topics from foreign magazines to supply more background information. One major conclusion was that in the Dutch East Indies coastal defence was not enough meaning that except for torpedo boats and submarines also gun ships were needed. The Royal Netherlands Navy which was at that time a minor navy and did  not possesses large gun ships except for some coastal defence ships. The necessity of dreadnought was discussed. At the moment that a decision was made to build a dreadnought, broke the First World War out. Dreadnoughts were never realized for the Royal Netherlands Navy. The same happened decades later. The Second World War prevented the building of battle cruisers. Dreadnoughts and battle cruisers were mainly to be used for the defence of the Dutch East Indies.

As an alternative for a dreadnought suggested the magazine to build an ocean going monitor, like the one discussed by engineer L. d’Adda in the Italian magazine Revista Nautica. The suggested monitor had a displacement of 8.200 ton and as dimensions 107,5 x 20 x 7,62 metres. The machinery was to consist of 12 engines (for instance diesels) with a total horsepower of 12.600 hp driving 6 screws (3 shafts/2 screws each shaft) allowing a speed of 22 knots. The armament was to consisted of 3-35,6cm guns, 2-19cm guns and 8-10cm guns. In the middle of the ship was an armoured redoute planned in which the 10cm guns were placed. On top of the redoute came an armoured turret with the 35,cm guns and on a higher level the 19cm guns. On top of this turret was the conning tower. The thickness of the armour of the gun turret and the redoute was to be 40cm. Further more were other parts of the ship to be armoured although of an decreased thickness like an armour deck. Using engines instead of turbines or piston rod driving engines was preferable while no funnel was needed allowing the gun turret a range of 360 degrees, none boilers meaning decreased weight, lower weight of the fuel, no smoke meaning less visibility, just the half of the engine room personnel, none loss of time for making steam and so on.

Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Zeehond bound for Surinam according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 29 June 1858

Model NG-MC-376 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported that the departure of the Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Zeehond captain lieutenant T.A.A. Gregory from Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands towards Surinam was planned on 15 July.

Note
1. Brig 1st class, call sign GRCW, laid down at the navy yard of Rotterdam, Netherlands by C.J. Glavimans 12 January 1844, launched as last ship from that navy 12 June 1850, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 9-11 August 1854, 3-31 May 1858, 9-15 February 1861, 10-13 October 1868, 14 July-3 October 1874, 27 January-28 July 1875, 27 September-6 October 1876, 11-13 April 1878, 24-26 March 1879, training ship at Hellevoetsluis 1873, stricken and stationed at Amsterdam, Netherlands to be used by the Kon. Ned. Zeil- en Roeivereniging for training sailors berthed in the Oosterdok 1882, replaced by the Pollux 23 May 1913, sold on an auction at the navy yard at Amsterdam 11.00 o’clock Wednesday 30 July, dimensions 30,5 (loadline) x 9,5 (inner hull) x 4,0 (fore)-4,5 (aft) x 4,98 (depth below main deck) metres. Displacement 473 tons and an armament of 12 guns.

Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Pallas bound for the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Midelburgsche Courant dated 1 May 1858

An item reported that the Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Pallas captain lieutenant H.F. Valentini was brought to the roads and to depart on 1 May towards Java, Dutch East Indies.

Note
1. Flush deck corvette, call sign GQRC, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands on 7 June 1839, launched on 19 June 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands between 18 January-14 April 1853, last mentioned in 1873, dimensions 39,50 x 10,80 x 5,00 metres, 900 tons displacement and an armament of 18-22 guns.

Dutch screw steamship Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaar arrived at Toulon, France according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 7 January 1858

Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaar as training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands

An item referred to a telegram received at the Dutch department of navy reporting the arrival on the 3rd by the Dutch screw steamship Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaar captain jhr. H.J.L.T. Vaynes van Brakell at Toulon, France. Everything was well on board.(1)

Note
1, Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.

Dutch training brig 1st class Zr. Ms. Zeehond arrived at Lisbon, Portugal according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 17 September 1857

Model NG-MC-376 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaar as training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands

Zr. Ms. De Ruyter

An item reported the arrival on 30th August at Lisbon. Portugal by the Dutch training brig Zr. Ms. Zeehond (1) with on board midshipmen which were to be transferred to the screw steam frigates Zr. Ms. De Ruyter (2) and Admiraal van Wassenaar (3) also lying at Lisbon. The Admiraal van Wassenaar departed on the 1st towards Mediterranean to be followed on the 5th by the De Ruyter. The latter was to cruise in the Atlantic. Everything was well on board of these ships.

Notes
1. Brig 1st class, call sign GRCW, laid down at the navy yard of Rotterdam, Netherlands by C.J. Glavimans 12 January 1844, launched as last ship from that navy 12 June 1850, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 9-11 August 1854, 3-31 May 1858, 9-15 February 1861, 10-13 October 1868, 14 July-3 October 1874, 27 January-28 July 1875, 27 September-6 October 1876, 11-13 April 1878, 24-26 March 1879, training ship at Hellevoetsluis 1873, stricken and stationed at Amsterdam, Netherlands to be used by the Kon. Ned. Zeil- en Roeivereniging for training sailors berthed in the Oosterdok 1882, replaced by the Pollux 23 May 1913, sold on an auction at the navy yard at Amsterdam 11.00 o’clock Wednesday 30 July, dimensions 30,5 (loadline) x 9,5 (inner hull) x 4,0 (fore)-4,5 (aft) x 4,98 (depth below main deck) metres. Displacement 473 tons and an armament of 12 guns.
2. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GQST, composite built (wood with iron plated, of the Atjeh-class, on stocks at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on slip 5 on 7 January 1879, launched on 22 September 1880, handed over by the navy on 18 October 1881, commissioned on 1 May 1885, decommissioned on 1 October 1894, repaired, commissioned on 1 September 1896,decommissioned at Nieuwediep, Netherlands on 27 May 1899, stricken and sold to be broken up on a public auction at Den Helder, Netherlands at 11.00 o’clock on Tuesday 28 May 1900 for ƒ 81.714.46½ to F.H. de Goeij, T.C. Bakker and J. Spruit of Den Helder, dimensions 80 (between perpendiculars)-92,1 (over all) x 12,5 x 6,1 metes, a displacement of 3.160 tons, 4 boilers, engine and boilers manufactured at N.S.M., Rotterdam, Netherlands, horsepower 3.000 hp, one screw, sail area 1.585 square metres, 3 masts, speed during trial with a medium draught of 5,49 metres 13,3 miles on 10 July 1885, speed on a trial with a medium draught of 5,88 metres, 13,75 miles on 27 August 1885, an armament of 6-17cm guns and 8-12cm guns and a crew numbering 280 men.
3. Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.

Sunday, 29 May 2016

French multi purpose repair ship Jules Verne (A620) 1969-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 29 May 2016

Ex-Achéron. Building ordered in 1961, laid down as ammunition ship at DCN, Brest, France in 1969, launched on 30 May 1970, commissioned on 1 June or 17 September 1976, after her keel was laid started a conversion into a floating workshop able to support a naval force of 3-6 warships with regular maintenance or battle damage , finished a 6 months overhaul at France on 29 June 1995, finished a overhaul in December 1979, out of service on 20 February 2009, decommissioned on 17 September 2010 and arrived on 29 May 2016 at Ghent, Belgium to be broken up. She was towed by the Dutch tug Multratug 20. Was stationed at Toulon, France although for a long time at Djibout,

Displacement 7.815-10.250 (full load) tons and as dimensions 147,00 x 21,56 x 6,50 metres. The armament consisted of 2x1-4cm 60-cal anti aircraft guns and 4x1-12,7mm machineguns. Machinery consisted pf 2 SEMT-Pielstick 12 PC V4oo diesels supplying 12.000 bhp allowing with a speed of 19 knots a range of 9.500 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 16 officers, 150 petty officers, 116 ratings and 120 passengers. There were 13 workshops for all needed tasks. Fitted out with 4-12 ton cranes. Medical facility for 16 persons and a compression chamber. The hangar of 300 square metres could store 2 hangars and a flight deck area of 500 square metres.

Dutch utility vessel M.P.R. 1 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 May 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9586409, MMSI 246713000 and call sign PCBX. Built at the Neptune Shipyard, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands. Owned and managed by MPR Marine, Rotterdam, Netherlands. Multicat 2611. Speed 10 knots. Gross tonnage 254 tons, net tonnage 76 tons and as dimensions 26,48 (over all) x 11,00 x 2,70 metres. Deck load 6 tons/square metre. Bollard pull 30 tons.

Danish container ship Eleonora Maersk 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 May 2016

Denmark International Register -flagged, homeport Svendborg, Denmark, IMO 9321500, MMSI 220477000 and call sign OVXP2. Owned and managed by AP Moller Maersk, Copenhagen, Denmark. Built at the Odense Steel Shipyard, Odense, Denmark in 2007.

German general cargo ship Green Mountain 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 May 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9502312, MMSI 538090454 and call sign V7ZQ7. Built at the Qingshan Shipyard, Wuhan, China on 2013. Owned and managed by MACS Shipping, Hamburg, Germany.

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Tula 1997-2011) Nina Victory 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 May 2016

Norway International Register-flagged, homeport Bergen, Norway, IMO 9105114, MMSI 257005000 and call sign LANG7. Built by 3 Maj Shipbuilding Industry, Rijeka, Croatia in 1997. Ex-Tula renamed August 2011. Owned and managed by Timur Shipmanagement, Singapore.

Cypriot bulk carrier (ex-Ocean Tramper 1999, Sirnes 1999-2001, UBC Svea 2001-2010) Maestro Tiger 2010-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 May 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9189677, MMSI 538003887 and call sign V7TU8. Built by Saiki Heavy Industries, Saiki, Japan in 1999. Owned and managed by Maestro Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Ex-Ocean Tramper renamed 16 April 1999, Sirnes renamed November 2001 and UBC Svea renamed April 2010.

Danish oil/chemical tanker (United Nelly 1997-2000, Bro Nelly 2000-2003, Nelly Wonsilo 2003-2007, Clipper Nelly 2007-2010) Nordic Nelly 2010-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 May 2016

Denmark-flagged, hohemport Copenhagen, Denmark, IMO 9130808, MMSI 220234000 and call sign OXNH2. Built by Union Naval Valencia, Valnecia, Spain on 1997. Owned and managed by Nordic Tankers Marine, Copenhagen, Denmark. Ex-United Nelly renamed March 2000, Bro Nelly renamed December 2003, Nelly Wonsilo renamed March 2007 and Clipper Nelly renamed April 2010.

Norwegian oil products tanker SKS Driva 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 27 May 2016

Norway-flagged, homeport Bergen, Norway, IMO 9428970, MMSI 257572000 and call sign LAIV7. Built at Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries, Samho, South Korea in 2010. Owned and managed byKGJ Obo&Tankers Fleet Management, Bergen, Norway.

British battleship HMS Barham 1913-1941

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 04. Laid down at John Brown, Clydebank, Scotland on 24 February 1913, launched on 31 October 1914, commissioned on 19 October 1915, modernized 1921-1922, November 1924-January 1925, begin 1928 and January 1931-January 1934 and sunk in the Mediterranean after leaving Alexandria, Egypt on the 24th taking with her 862 men after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-311 on 25 November 1941. Building costs 2.470.113 pond sterling.

Displacement 33.110 (normal)-33.794 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 (deep load) 9,19 metres or 643.9 x 90.6 x 33 feet. The Parsons direct drive steam turbines and 24 boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered 1.016 men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

British battleship HMS Valiant 1913-1948

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 02. Laid down at Fairfield, Clydebank, Scotland on 31 January 1913, launched on 4 November 1914, completed in February 1916, commissioned on 13 January 1916, modernized 1929-1930 and March 1937-November 1939, decommissioned in July 1945 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1948 by Arnott Young at Cairnryan, Scotland in 1948. Building costs 2.537.037 pond sterling.

Displacement 33.100 (normal)-33.794 (deep load)) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 (deep load) metres or 643.9 x 90.6 x 33 feet. Two sets Brown-Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered between 919-1.218 men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

British battleship HMS Warspite 1912-1950

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 03. Laid down at the HMD Dockyard Devonport, England on 31 October 1912, launched on 26 November 1913, commissioned on 8 March 1915, modernized in 1924 and March 1934-March 1937, decommissioned on 1 February 1945,while underway to be broken up run aground at Prussian Cove around 19 April 1947. Efforts to salvage her in 1950 were not successful and after she was finally beached off St. Michael’s Mount {Marazion, England] and there broken up. .

Displacement 33.110 (normal)-33.794 (deep load) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 metres or 643.9 x 90.7 x 33 feet. Two sets Brown-Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 Yarrow boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered between 1.025-1.262-1.920 (as flagship) men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

British battleship HMS HMS Malaya 1913-1948

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 01. Laid down at Armstrong Whitworth and Company, High Walker, Tyneside, England on 20 October 1913, launched on 18 March 1915, commissioned on 1 February 1916, in reserve since end of 1943, used as target in Loch Striven 15/17 May 1944, decommissioned to be used if needed as bombardment battleship, decommissioned becoming accommodation ship for torpedo school  end 1944 and sold to Metal Industries on 20 February 1948 and broken up at Faslane, Scotland in 1948. Building costs 2.045.709 pond sterling.

Displacement 33.100 (normal)-33.794 (deep load)) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 (deep load) metres or 643.9 x 90.6 x 33 feet. Two sets Brown-Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered 1.217 men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

British battleship HMS Agincourt 1913-1914

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Building at the HM Dockyard Portsmouth, England authorized in 1913 and to be completed late in 1916 but due to the outbreak of the First World War never realized.

Displacement 33.100 (normal)-33.794 (deep load)) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 10,1 (deep load) metres or 643.9 x 90.6 x 33 feet. Two sets Brown-Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 14x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

British battleship HMS Queen Elizabeth 1912-1948

Iron Duke-class

Queen Elizabeth-class

Revenge-class

Consisted of the Queen Elizabeth, Malaya, Warspite, Valiant, Barham, Malaya and the in 1914 cancelled Agincourt. Preceded by the Iron Duke-class and succeeded by the Revenge-class. Pennant 00. Laid down at the HM Dockyard Portsmouth, England on 21 October 1912, launched on 16 October 1913, completed in January 1914, commissioned on 22 December 1914, rebuilt in 1926-1927 and 1937-1941, reserve since August 1945, stricken on 7 July 1948, sold to Arnott Young and broken up at Dalmuir in July 1948. Building costs 3.014.103 pond sterling.

Displacement 27.500 (standard)-36.500 (full load) tons and as dimensions 196,82 (over all) x 27,58 x 9,19 metres or 643.9 x 90.6 x 30.”2 feet. Two sets Brown Curtiss direct drive steam turbines and 24 boilers supplied via 4 shaft 75.000 shp allowing a speed of 24 knots. With a oil bunker capacity of 3.400 ton and a speed of 12 knots was their range 5.000 nautical miles. The crew numbered between 1.262-1.920 (when acting as flagship) men. The armament consisted of 4x2-38,1cm/15” Mk I guns, 15x1-15,2cm/6” breech loading Mk XII guns, 2x1-3” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 4x1-3pd/4,7cm saluting guns and 4-53cm/21” submerged torpedo tubes. Krupp cemented armour consisted of a 4”(end aft)-6” (end fore)-13” middle thick belt, upper belt 6”, 4 and 6” bulkheads for and aft, gun turrets, barbettes and conning tower protected by respectively 4.25” (top)-11” (sides)-13” (face), 4-6” (below belt)-7-10” (above belt) and 3” (roof)-4” (revolving hood)-11” (sides), 6” guns protected by 6” thick armour and conning tower tube, torpedo conning tower and torpedo conning tower tube by respectively 4-6”, 6“ and 4“.

The main armament of the new American battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 6

British Courageous-class battle cruisers

Briitsh aircraft carrier HMS Furious

An item referred to the American magazine Army and Navy Register reporting that the rumours that the US navy considered to arm the new American battleships with 18” in stead of 16” guns was not correct. It was mentioned that in the First World War in England 4-18” guns were manufactured placed on board of the HMS Furious (1) and 3 monitors. Lord Fisher (2) ordered that at Elswick [by Armstrong?] a test gun of 20” was manufactured. The shell for this gun weighed around 2,5 ton and was able to pierce over a distance of 10 miles still armour with a thickness of 30“. The calibre was to be used on board of the designed battle cruiser Incomparable (3) of which the building after the war was cancelled.

Notes
1. This must be the battle cruiser Furious laid down on 8 June 1915. Launched on 15 August 1916, commissioned n 26 June 1917, converted into an aircraft carrier during the building and sold to be broken up in 1940. Of the Courageous-class with 2x1-18“ guns. Her 18” guns were used for the Lord Clive-class monitors HMS General Wolfe and Lord Clive.
2. John ‘Jackie’Fisher (25 January 1841 Ramboda, Ceylon-10 July 1920 London, England), left the service as Admiral of the Fleet and was Firs Sea Lord in 1904-1910 and 1914-1915.
3. Building was proposed by Fisher on 1915 but apparently never designed. She was to have a standard displacement of 46.000 tons and as dimensions 304,8 x 31,7 x 7,3 (deep load) metres or 1.000 x 104 x 24 feet with an main armament of 3x3050,8cm/20” breech loading guns).

British destroyer HMS Wolverine commissioned according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 6

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record reporting that the British destroyer Wolverine was commissioned in last August. Displacement 1.316 tons with a trial speed 34-35 miles. The two turbines and 3 oil fired boilers and a fuel bunker capacity of 400 ton allowed at full speed a range of 1.000 miles. The armament consisted of 4-4,7” guns, 2-7,6cm anti aircraft guns and 2x3 torpedo tubes. On stocks in October 1918 and launched in July 1919.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at James Samuel White&Co. Ltd., East Cowes, Isle of Wight, on 8 October 1919, launched on 17 July 1919, commissioned on 27 February 1920 and sold to be broken up in 28 January 1946. Of the Admiralty-class destroyers.

Gun arrangement of British battle cruiser HMS Hood according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1920 no. 8

British HMS Queen Elizabeth class battleships

DesignBritish battle cruiser  HMS Hood dated 1919

Drawing of the HMS Hood made by G.J. Frans Naerebout. 
Published in Op de Lange Deining written by G.A.J. Bovens

An item referred to the magazine Scientific American dated 21 August 1920 reporting that the 38,1cm guns with which HMS Hood was fitted out had a calibre of L/45 instead of the L/42 on board of the Queen Elizabeth-class making it possible to fire a salvo with 8 guns each 35 seconds. The maximum elevation became 30 degrees.

Note
1. Nicknamed Mighty Hood. Pennant 51. Her building at the shipyard of John Brown&Company was ordered on 7 April 1916, laid down on 1 September, launched on 22 August 1918, commissioned on 15 May 1920 as world largest warship, sunk on 24 May 1941 during her battle with the German battleship Bismarck. The only one of the four projected Admiral class battle cruisers caused by an sufficient design despite the modifications after the Battle of Jutland (31 May-1 June 1916). During this battle England lost battle cruisers due to the weakness of their armour. Building costs 6.025.000 pond sterling. With a displacement of 46.680 long tons/47.430 tons (deep load) and as dimensions 262,3 x 31,8 x 9,8 metres or 860’7”x 104’2”x 32’0”. The geared Brown-Curtis steam turbines with the 24 Yarrow water-tube boilers delivered via 4 shafts and screws144.000 shp allowing in 1920 a speed of 31 knots which was by 1941 reduced to 28 knots. With a reduced speed of 20 knots she had in 1931 a range of 5.332 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 1.433 (in 1919)-1.325 (by 1941). The original armament consisted of 4x2-15”/38,1cm guns, 12x1-5,5” guns, 4x1-4” anti aircraft guns and 6-21”?53,3cm guns. When she met her final fate was she armed with 4x2-15”/38,1cm guns, 7x2-4” quick firing anti aircraft guns, 3x8-2pd quick firing anti aircraft pom pom, 5x4-0.5” machine guns, 5x20- barrel unrotated projectile mounts and 2x2-21”/53,3cm surfaced torpedo tubes. She was also armoured with a 6-12”/15,2-30,5cm thick belt, a 3”-0.3’/7,6-1,9cm deck, 4”-5”/10,2-12,7cm bulk heads with the barbettes, gun turrets and conning tower protected by respectively 5“-12”/12,7-30,5cm, 11”-15”/27,9-38,1cm and 9”-11”/22,9-27,9cm. The scheduled major rebuilding planned in 1941 was never realized due to the outbreak of the Second World War.

The armament of the French cruisers Duquesne and Tourville according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1924 no. 6

An item referred to the German magazine Schiffbau dated 1924 no. 25 reporting that the two recently laid down 10.000 ton French cruiser Duquesne and Tourville were to be armed with 4x2-20,3cm guns, 8-7,5cm guns and 8-4cm anti aircraft guns.(1)

Note
1. The Duquesne-class consisting of the Duquesne and Tourville, preceded by the Duguay Trouin-class and succeeded by the Suffren-class, with a displacement of 10.000 (standard)-12.200 (full load) tons. Duquesne laid down at Arsenal de Brest, France on 30 October 1924 and broken up in 1955 and the Tourville laid down at Arsenal de Lorient on 14 April 1925 and broken up in 1963.

Building of French submarines Redoutable and Vengeur ordered according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1924 no. 6

An item referred to the Navy and Military Record dated 3 September 1924 reporting that the French minister of marine ordered that the submarines of a new design named Redoubtable (1) and Vengeur (2) were to be lay down and to be ready in April 1927 for executing their trials.

Notes
1. Hull number Q136. Ordered on 26 July 1924, laid down at Cherbourg on 1 July 1925, launched on 24 February 1928, commissioned on 10 July 1931, scuttled while docked at Nord du Mourillon  on 27 November 1942 to prevent use by German forces which took the useful parts out of her. Towed towards Brégaillon on 25 January 1944, sunk by an American air attack on 11 March 1944, salvaged and broken up in 1948.
2. Hull number Q137. Ordered on 26 July 1924, laid down at Cherbourg on 22 August 1924, launched on 11 January 1926, commissioned on 18 December 1931, scuttled on 27 November 1942 and broken up in 1043.

Gun arrangement of the Japanese cruiser Turutaka according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that the gun arrangement of the new Japanese cruiser Turutaka consisted of 6x1-20cm gun turrets placed amidships.(1)

Note
1. Of the Furutaka heavy cruisers-class, laid down at the Mitsubishi shipyards, Nagasaki, Japan on 5 December 1922, launched on 25 February 1925, commissioned on 21 March 1926 and sunk by the American USS heavy cruiser Salt Lake City and destroyers Duncan on 12 October 1942 during the Battle of Cape Esperance on 12 October 1942.

British steamship HMS Caledonia became training ship at Rosyth, Scotland according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I dated May 1937 that the HMS Caledonia (the former steamship Majestic) was to be used at Rosyth, Scotland as accommodation for 2.000 young sailors to be trained there.(1)

Note
1. Purchased in 1936, commissioned in 1937, lost due to a fire on 29 September 1939, salvaged and broken up in 1943. The former German steamship Bismarck laid down at Blohm&Voss, Hamburg, Germany in 1913, launched on 20 June 1914, handed over to the United Kingdom in 1920 and became the RMS Majestic, renamed Caledonia on 23 April 1937.

Russian navy building new flotilla leaders according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1937 no. 4

An item referred to the Proceedings dated April 1937 reporting that the Russian flotilla leaders Leningrad and Minsk were nearly completed with 4 others apparently being built, Displacement 2.500 tons and as armament 5-13cm guns and 6-53,3cm torpedo tubes.

Saturday, 28 May 2016

Dutch paddle steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Gedeh arrived at Lisbon, Portugal according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant dated 27 August 1856


An item reported the arrival of the Dutch steamship Zr. Ms. Gedeh captain lieutenant B.H. Staring underway from the Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies on the 13th on the Taag at Lisbon, Portugal. (1)

Note
1. Paddle steamship 1st class, first called steam warship, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands 25 October 1846, launched 26 April 1850, commissioned 16 April 1851, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 13-30 January 1857, in worse condition in , laid up at Surabaya and sold at the navy establishment on Saturday 29 November to be broken up 1862, served also in the Dutch East Indies, dimensions 56.00 (between perpendiculars) x 10.70 x 4.80 metres, displacement of 1.486 tons, an armament of 8 guns and 300 hp horsepower.

Dutch screw steam frigate Zr. Ms. De Ruyter arrived at Marseille, France according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant Tuesday 26 May 1857

A screw steam frigate

As steam floating battery lying in the Dokhaven, Vlissingen, Netherlands

Model as steam floating battery NG-MC-118 Rijksmusem Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

Model as ship of the line, Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. . Original url

An item dated Marseille, France 20nd reported the arrival a day earlier of the Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. De Ruyter captain H.J. van Maldeghem coming from Toulon, France and towed by the Bulldog.(1)

Note
1. Call sign GQSV. On stocks at the naval yard at Flushing, Netherlands 20 August 1831 as 74 guns ship of the line 2nd class. Dimensions 54,16 x 14,30/14,70 x 6,46-7,32m, displacement 3000-3655 ton (maximum), sail area 237 M2. Crew numbered 650 men. As 54-gun frigate 1st class on stocks at the naval yard at Flushing 22 February 1850, launched 8 August 1853, commissioned 21 August 1854. Dimensions 54,16 x 14,30/14,70 x 6,10-6,80m, displacement 2770 ton, sail area 2170 square metres. Crew numbered 500 men. Rebuilt at naval yard at Hellevoetsluis and NSBM Fijenoord as a steam frigate. In dry dock at the naval yard at Hellevoetsluis 20-21 October 1859 and in the aft dock 25 October-1860-19 September 1861. In 1860 fitted out there with steam power and fitted out with 45 guns. Launched 19 September 1861, commissioned 17 April 1862 but further conversion stopped. Dimensions 60,30/63,50 x 14,30/14,70 x 6,10-6,80m, displacement 2828 ton, sail area 2.450 square metres. Crew numbered 500 men. Rebuilt as an floating battery at the naval yard at Vlissingen. On stocks mid 1862, completed  mid 1865, commissioned 21 July 1870, de commissioned on 9 October 1870 and finally sold at Willemsoord to be broken up 1874. Dimensions 60,30/63,00 x 14,30/14,93 x 6,40-6,80m, displacement 2944-3050 ton (maximum). Crew numbered 250 men. Armed with 14-60pdrs and served at the mouth of the Schelde. Her figurehead was made of fir-wood representing a bust of the Dutch sea hero M.A. de Ruyter. When she was rebuilt as a steam battery, a same project was going on in Denmark namely with the Dannebrog. The Danes visited the Netherlands to see De Ruyter.

Dutch screw steam frigate Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaer arrived at Vlissingen, Netherlands according to the Dutch newspaper Middelburgsche Courant Tuesday 26 May 1857

As training ship at Amsterdam, Netherlands

Model NG-MC-104 half stern Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original url


Model NG-MC-480Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original url

An item reported the arrival yesterday afternoon at Vlissingen, Netherlands of the Dutch screw steam frigate Zr. Ms. Admiraal van Wassenaer (1) towed by the Dutch paddle steamship Zr. Ms. Cycloop (2) lieutenant 2nd class I.M.P. Willinck coming from the Nieuwediep, Netherlands. The Cycloop immediately returned afterwards to sea. On the Friday before performed the steam frigate very well during the steam trials in the roads of Texel [and in the Eierlandse Gat between Texel and Vlieland?]. She was to be coppered in Vlissingen.

Notes
1. Call sign GQBE, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands as the 74 gun ship of the line Piet Hein on 15 February 1833, disassembled 1850, laid down as a screw steam frigate designed by A.E. Tromp in 1853, launched as the Admiraal van Wassenaar on 6 September1856, commissioned on 16 July 1857, converted into a training ship at the navy yard of Amsterdam 1875, commissioned for training boys and ordinary seaman 11 April 1876, until 1 January 1913 used as training and guard ship at Amsterdam and sold on 28 May at Amsterdam for ƒ 37.781,00 to be broken up, displacement 3.650 tons, dimensions 62,36 (between perpendiculars)-72,86 (over all) x 15,72 x 6,80 metres, horsepower 300 hp, speed maximum 10,67 miles, armament 8 (4 medium 30pd guns, 4-12cm guns, 1877: long 12pd guns)-45 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. On 1 October 1876 were 335 boys trained divided over 4 groups, the youngest (group 1) numbered 108 boys, groups no.2-4 respectively 103, 60 and 64.
2. Paddle steamship 2nd/3rd class, call sign GQHB, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 23 July 1840, commissioned on 1 June 1843, launched on 13 June, refitted to be used as transport for royalties in 1845, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 11-14 September 1850, 13-February-2 September and 15 November-1 December 1856 and 29 July-1 August 1861, transferred to the Indische Militaire Marine in 1867, condemned and stricken 1873, dimensions 47,00 (on load lone between perpendiculars) x 8,95 (inner hull) x 3,5 (medium) x 5,36 (hold amidships to main deck) metres, 875 tons displacement, 2 masts,1 funnel, 6 guns (consisting of 1-20cm grenade gun, 1 rifled 16cm gun, 4-30 pd carronades, according to Obreen in wartime 2-20“grenade guns, 4 medium 30pd guns, in peace time 2 long 30pd guns, 2-medium 30pd guns and 10-1pd swivels)), 220 hp horsepower and a crew numbering 90-100 men.

Argentinean naval budget approved according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 1926 No. 21 reporting that the Argentinean parliament approved a budget of 75 million gold pesos for strengthening the navy.

Fuel consumption by British warships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 1926 no. 9 reported that in the Royal British navy 301 ships with a total displacement of 668.000 tons were oil fuelled, 26 ships with a total displacement of 176.000 tons were coal-oil fuelled and 181 ships with a total displacement of 177.000 tons were coal fired.

The Italian naval budget for 1926-1927 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1926 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Revue maritime dated April 1926 no. 76 reported that the Italian navy asked for the budget year 1926-1927 a budget pf 1.040.340.000 lire which was an increase of 60.340.000 lire compared with the former budget year. The increase was mainly caused by more wages (19 million lire) and new building (33 million lire).

German container ship (ex-Rio Teslin 2004, P&O Nedlloyd Teslin 2004-2005, Nedlloyd Teslin 2005-2012) Rio Teslin 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 May 2016

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9283693, MMSI 636091130 and call sign A8JS6. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2004. Owned and managed by MPC Munchmeyer Petersen Steamship, Hamburg, Germany. Ex-Rio Teslin renamed March 2004, ex-P&O Nedlloyd Teslin renamed December 2005 and Nedlloyd Teslin renamed April 2012.