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Saturday, 23 September 2017

Panama-flagged research survey vessel (ex-Karin June, Karen Wood -1996, Karen June 1996-1998, Prelude, American Champion 1998, Atlantic Enterprise 1998-2015, Geco Triton 2015-2017?) Atlantic Enterprise 2017-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 23 September 2017

Panama-flagged, IMO 7202554, MMSI 355468000 and call sign 3FJK8. As the Geco Triton owned and managed by Westerngeco, London, United Kingdom, Built by Signal Ship Repair, Mobile, Alabama, USA. Ex-Karen June renamed January …, Karen Wood renamed March 1996, Karen June renamed March 1997, Prelude renamed January 1991? American Champion renamed July 1998, Atlantic Enterprise renamed April 2015 and Geco Triton renamed 2017? Part of the fleet of Atlantic Marine?

Japanese battleship Yashima 1894-1904


Part of the Fuji-class consisting of the Fuji and the Yashima, preceded by the Kongo-class and succeeded by the Shikishima-class. A with around 2.000 tons decreased but in many ways improved British Royal Sovereign-class battleships design. Fuji was designed by George C. Mackrow and the Yashima by Philip Watts.(1) Building ordered under the 1894 Naval Programme. Laid down by Armstrong, Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England on 6 December 1894, launched on 28 December 1896, sea trials executed in September 1897, completed on 9 September 1897 and heavily damaged after striking Russian mines she sunk on 15 May 1904. Fitted out to serve as flagship for the admiral. 

Displacement 12.430 tons (normal) and as dimensions 125,6 (over all) x 22,25 x 7,925 (full load0  metres or 412 x 72 x 26 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 10 cylindrical boilers supplying via 2 shafts 13.500 ihp (design)-14.075 ihp (sea trials) with forced draught allowing a speed of 18,25 (design)-19,46 (trial) knots and with a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.200 tons was the range 4.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 650 men. Original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 10x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 20x1-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd guns, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9”/2,5 pd Hotchkiss guns and 5-45,72cm/18” torpedo tubes. The Harvey steel made armour consisted of a 35,6cm/14”-45,7cm/18” thick deck, a 6,4cm/2.5” thick deck while the gun turrets were protected by 15,2cm/6” thick armour. 

Note
1. Philip Watts (30 May 1846 Deptford, Kent, England-15 March 1926 Chelsea, London, England), naval architect who designed also the British HMS Dreadnought, but also designed ships for navies all over the world. Worked for the British Royal Navy and for Armstrong, Whitworth&Co., Elswick, England

Japanese battleship Fuji 1894-1948


Part of the Fuji-class consisting of the Fuji and the Yashima, preceded by the Kongo-class and succeeded by the Shikishima-class. A with around 2.000 tons decreased but in many ways improved British Royal Sovereign-class battleships design. Fuji was designed by George C. Mackrow (1) and the Yashima by Philip Watts. Building ordered under the 1894 Naval Programme. Laid down by Thames Iron Works and Shipbuilding Company, Leamouth, London, England on 1 August 1894, launched on 31 March 1896, commissioned on 8 Auguts 1897, completed on 17 August 1897, modernized receiving new Miyabara water-tube boilers and Japanese manufactured guns, reclassified as training hulk and barrack on 1 September 1922, stationed since then at Yokosuka, decommissioned in 1923, damaged during an American air attack on 18 July 1945, sunk after the war and broken up in 1948.

Displacement 12.430 tons (normal) and as dimensions 125,6 (over all) x 22,25 x 7,925 (full load0  metres or 412 x 72 x 26 feet. The machinery consisted of 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines and 10 cylindrical boilers supplying via 2 shafts 13.500 ihp with forced draught allowing a speed of 18 (design)-18,5 (trial) knots and with a speed of 10 knots and a maximum coal bunker capacity of 1.200 tons was the range 4.000 nautical miles. Crew numbered 650 men. Original armament consisted of 2x2-30,5cm/12” guns, 10x1-15,2cm/6” quick firing guns, 20x1-4,7cm/1.9”/3pd guns, 4x1-4,7cm/1.9”/2,5 pd Hotchkiss guns and 5-45,72cm/18” torpedo tubes. The Harvey steel made armour consisted of a 35,6cm/14”-45,7cm/18” thick deck, a 6,4cm/2.5” thick deck while the gun turrets were protected by 15,2cm/6” thick armour.

Note
1. Georg Colby Mackrow (7 March 1830 born/11 April 1830 baptized Limehouse-7 February1907), naval architect of the shipyard. 

Soviet warships passing Japanese coast according to a report of the American intelligence dated 16 July 1951

An item reported that two Soviet warships with the pennants X4 and X5 belonging to the 2nd Naval Squadron left on 20 June Dairen towards the south, passing Okinawa going northeast along the Japanese coast. On the 28th was the X4 on the position 147-30 and 40-00 and the X5 a day later 2:20 a.m. at 148-00 and 37-30. With a speed 0f 16 knots were the ship continuing a north east course. In the beginning of the same month was the same route followed by other Soviet warships passing Mokkaid arriving at Vladivistok.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008100430010-8. 

Chinese Communist navy personnel training according to a report of the American intelligence dated 25 July 1950

An item reported that in begin summer 1950 at the naval academy at Hsiapingtao (121-29, 38-50) 6.000 cadets participated in navigation, marine engineering and gunnery courses. Recruited from the Dairen/Port Arthur, Chinchou and Antung areas were they divided over 4 battalions. There were 2 small gunboats available for the training. So-called ‘infected’ personnel belonging to the Nationalist navy were taken in custody and next reindoctrinated and trained in barracks earlier used by the Japanese armed forces at Lungtou, Port Arthur.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R005400180011-5. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 7 September 1951

An item reported that on 21 August in the Port Arthur-Dairen area a destroyer squadron was active consisting of 10 German Na-wei-kó type 2 destroyers commanded by Kan-na-wei-chí, commander-in-chief of the Port Arthur-Dairen area. Apparently it was stationed at Vladivostok. According to added comments were it possible Narvik-type destroyers (1) and that Karmanovski was naval commander.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008500610001-4.

Note
1. German Type 1936A and Type1936A (Mob) of Narvik-class destroyers, displacement 2.600 (standard)-3.605 (maximum) tons and as dimensions 127 x 12 x 4,65 metres or 416.8” x 39.4 x 15.3”. Horsepower 70.000 hp, speed 37,5 knots. Crew numbering 220 men. The Z33, laid down on 22 December 1940 was after the Second World War added to the Soviet fleet and renamed Provorniy and sunk while used as a target in 1961. Armament consisted of 1x2&3x1-15cm guns as main artillery armament and 8-53,3cm torpedo tubes. 

Russian naval-shore fortifications and submarine pens at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 17 May 1948

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

An item reported that in December 1947 the naval-shore fortifications were completed. Supervisor during the construction was the army engineer Vasilenko, earlier involved as chief construction engineer at the fortifications at Kronstadt. The fortifications were spread over a land area with a depth of 20 miles excluded the fortified island. All defence works were now part of the Changshan Archipelago (122-30, 39-15). The covered submarine pens in the naval-shore fortified sector in the Guangchinshan (121º.15’30” and 38º.47’45”). The channel between the gulf and the outer bay was considerably widened. Responsible for the actual defence was the Far Eastern Naval Rifle Brigade (comparable with marines) depending on heavy artillery for support if needed.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001500510009-4. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 4 October 1948

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

May 1948 were in the East Harbour lying one V-19 type submarine, armed with 4 torpedo tubes and a crew numbering 21 men. Further more 6-1.300 tons submarines with a speed of 16 (surfaced)-9 (submerged) knots and an artillery armament of 2-7,62cm/3” guns. There was also an unspecified vessel with a displacement of 4.792 tons. Speed 16 knots (cruising). The crew numbered 410 men. The armament consisted of 4-22,86cm/9” (?) guns, 8-15,24cm/6” guns, 14 smaller guns and a not specified number of torpedo tubes. There were also 9 smaller vessels. In the West Harbour were lying a hospital ship which arrived there on 11 May and a 1 tanker loaded with gasoline which arrived there on 22 May.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001900410011-8. 

Russian naval forces at Port Arthur according to a report of the American intelligence dated 26 December 1947

The report dealing with the Soviet naval forces belonging to the Soviet Pacific 3rd Fleet stationed at Port Arthur supplied interesting details. The Second World War in which the USA and the Soviet Union were allies against the Axis powers had only passed 2 years. Tensions grew to the Western powers (including the USA) and the Soviet Union and satellite states ending in a period called the Cold War, not earlier ending as in 1991. The document dates from the first stage of the Cold War.

There were 3 Soviet submarines of the V-19 design sighted in the East Harbour. With a crew of more as 20 men consisted the armament of 4 torpedo tubes and a machinery consisting of 750hp engines. Further more was near Port Arthur a in 1935 in Germany built 250 tons submarine seen. Horsepower 750hp , 4 torpedo tubes and a crew of 22 men. There was in the same harbour also a in 1943 6.000 tons cruiser while 3 similar cruisers left on 14 August the West harbour. In the West harbour were 5 transports and another 3 submarines anchored. This were larger submarines as the ones lying in the East harbour. With a displacement of 1.300 tons was their speed 16 (surfaced)-10 (submerged) knots. Their artillery armament consisted of 2-7,62cm/3” guns. Again was there also a large 1.300 tons German submarine with a speed of 17 (surfaced)-10 9submerged) knits and armed with 2-7,62cm/3” guns. Mine fields were laid to outside the harbours as protection.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, CIA document number CIA-RDP82-00457R001200110008-2. 

Swedish galley Adlerfelt 1742-1774

Built at Stockholm in 1742, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lowen 1739-1787

Built at Stockholm in 1739, last mentioned in 1787, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Akerhielm 1739-1733

Built at Stockholm in 1739, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lagerberg 1737-1761

Built at Stockholm in 1737, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley De la Gardie 1736-1766

Built at Stockholm in 1736, last mentioned >1761-1766<

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. Reports last mentioned in 1761, correspondence with Jan Glete last mentioned 1766. 

Swedish galley Baner 1736-1761

Built at Stockholm in 1736, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Friday, 22 September 2017

Dutch fishing vessel Adriana Maatje (TH-5) 1985-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8411645, MMSI 245415000 and call sign PCDG. Built by Van Santen Constructie, Sliedrecht, Netherlands in 1985. 

Singapore oil/chemical tanker (ex-Alexander 1998-2003, Garonne 2003-2004, Gironde 2004-2005, Songa Aneline 2005-2007) Sichem Aneline 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9171735, MMSI 538002315 and call sign V7HV3. Owned by Eitzen Chemical Singapore, Singapore and managed by Selandia Shipmanagement India, Mumbai, India. Built by Astillero Barreras, Vigo, Spain in 1998. Ex-Alexander renamed June 2003, Garonne renamed April 2004, Gironde renamed July 2005 and Songa Aneline renamed January 2007. 

Dutch general cargo ship (ex-Sabinia 2000-2006, Westgard 2006-2015) Westborg 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Delfzijl, Netherlands, IMO 9196187, MMSI 246457000 and call sign PDBQ. Part of fleet of Royal Wagenborg, Delfzijl, Netherlands. As the Westgard, Netherlands-flagged, homeport Rotterdam, Netherlands owned and managed by Bore, Helsinki, Finland. Ex-Sabinia renamed January 2006. Built by Peters Shipyard, Kampen, Netherlands in 2000. Renamed Westgard on April 2015. 

Dutch containership (ex-Sea Baltica 1996-2005, Maersk Roscoff 2005-2008) Evolution 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Harlingen, IMO 9136228, MMSI 246386000 and call sign PHHV. Ex-Sea Baltica renamed July 2005 and Maersk Roscoff renamed November 2008. Owned and managed by JR Shipping, Harlingen, Netherlands. Built by YVC Ysselwerf, Capelle aan den Ijssel, Netherlands in 1996. 

Budget for Norwegian submarine approved according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 8

An item referred to the le Yacht reporting that the budget of 466.000 francs for building a Holland type submarine for Norway was approved. 

Swedish galley Gref Sparre 1730-1774

Of Italian construction, built at Stockholm in 1730, last mentioned in 1774, with an armament of 3 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Ducker 1726-1769

Built at Vastervik in 1726, last mentioned in 1769.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Tessin 1726-1786

Built at Vastervik in 1726, rebuilt as a ‘hast’ galley in 1754, last mentioned in 1786, with an armament of 2 guns.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Stadsvarvet 1725-1758

Built at Stockholm in 1725, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Dutch container ship (ex-Miriam Borchard 2001-2004, Berit 2004, Holland Maas Habana 2004-2005, Berit 2005-2009, WEC Dalie 2009-2013, Berit 2013) WEC Vermeer 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Cyprus-flagged, homeport Limassol, IMO 9237371, MMSI 209177000 and 5BLR3. Built by JJ Sietas Schiffswerft, Hamburg, Germany in 2001. As the Berit owned and managed by Voge Heinz Georg, Stade, Germany. Ex-Miriam Borchard (of Borchard Lines Ltd.) renamed February 2004, Berit (of MS Berit Heinz-Georg Voge KG) renamed March 2004, Holland Maas Habana (chartered by Holland Maas Container Line) renamed June 205, Berit of MS Berit Heinz-Georg Voge KG) renamed October 2009, WEC Dali (chartered by West European Container Lines) renamed March 2013 and Berit renamed in … As WEC Vermeer chartered by Holland Maas Scheepvaartbeheer III B.V., Rotterdam, Netherlands or owned by Holland Maas Scheepvaartbeheer III B.V., Limasol, Cyprus and managed by WEC Lines B.V., Rotterdam. 

Polish bulk carrier Kociewie 2009-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 September 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, IMO 9423798, MMSI 311014100 and call sign C6XM5. Owned and managed by Polsteam, Ssczecin, Poland. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry, Tianjin, China in 2009. 

Liberian crude oil tanker Primorsky Prospect 2010-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 18 September 2017

Liberia-flagged, homeport Monrovia, IMO 9511533, MMSI 636014355 and call sign A8TH5. Owned and managed by SCF Unicom Singapore, Monrovia, Liberia. Built by Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries, Samho, South Korea in 2010. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker STI Westminster 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall slands-flagged, IMO 9706437, MMSI 538005539 and call sign V7EV3. Owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Monaco. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2015. 

Monaco oil/chemical tanker STI Finchley 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9696565, MMSI 538005406 and call sign V7DB8.
Owned and managed by Scorpio Commercial Management, Monaco. Built by Hyundai Mipo Dockyard, Ulsan, South Korea in 2014. 

Costa Rican reefer Dole Europa 1994-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Bahamas-flagged, homeport Nassau, Bahamas, IMO 9046514, MMSI 311296000 and call sign C6FS5. Built by Gdansk Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland in 1994. Owned and managed by Reefership Marine Services, San Jose, Costa Rica. 

British oil/chemical tanker Crystal Topaz 2006-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Malta flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9327047, MMSI 248075000 and call sign 9HA2164. With a gross tonnage of 7.903 tons and summer deadweight of 11.340 tons and as dimensions 125 x 20 x 7,4 metres. Homeport Valletta. Build in 2006 at the shipyard of Sekwang Heavy Industries Mokpo at Mokpo, South Korea. Owned by Crystal Pool UK, London, England  and managed by Crystal Pool of Genoa, Italy. 

Norwegian oil/chemical tanker (ex-Serra D 2005-2006, Vedrey Heden 2006-2008, Brovig Marine 2008-2015) Key Marin 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9297228, MMSI 236342000 and call sign ZDHP4. Built by Turkter Shipyard, Istanbul, Turkey in 2005. As the Brovig Marin owned by Fjord Shipping, Maaloy, Norway and managed by Columbia Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Ex-Serra D renamed August 2006 and Vedrey Heden renamed December 2008. As the Key Marin owned by Key Shipping AS and operated by Columbia Shipmanagement Ltd. Other sources reporting owned and managed by Kokoda Tankers Farsund, Norway or part of the fleet of Sea Tank Chartering AS. 

Cypriot oil/chemical tanker Stena Image 2015-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Bermuda-flagged, homeport Hamilton, IMO 9667473, MMSI 310683000 and call sign ZCEM7. Built as Guangzhou 12130002 by Guangzhou International Shipyard, Guangzhou, China in 2015. Owned by Stena MR Cyprus, Limassol. Cyprus and managed by Stena Bulk, Gothenburg, Sweden. 

Belgian anchor handling tug (ex- Leo Bay 1999, Torm Heron 1999-2004, Howard Hogue 2004-2005, Sea Lynx 2005-2016) Union Lynx 2016-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 September 2017

Belgium-flagged, IMO 9178410, MMSI 205695000 and call sign ORRW. KMAR404-design. As the Sea Lynx owned by Deep Sra Supply and managed by Deep Sea Supply Management Singapore, both of Limassol, Cyprus. Norway-flagged, homeport Arendal. Ex-Leo Bay renamed 1999, Torm Heron renamed May 2004, Howard Hogue renamed September 2005, Sea Lyn renamed in 2016 and MMSI 258567000. Built by Loland Verft, Leirvik i Sogn, Norway with yard number 281in 1999. Renamed after 6 March 2016 Union Lynx and taken over by Boskalis Offshore BV, Antwerp, Belgium. Gross tonnage 2.556 tons, net tonnage 810 tons, deadweight 2.900 tons and as dimensions 74 x 17 x 6,1 metres. Horsepower 15.000 ahp. 

Dutch deck cargo pontoon (ex-Discovery II 2010-2011) CC Atlantique 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 September 2017

IMO 9562245. Built in 2010. Ex-Discovery II renamed May 2011. Owned and managed by Acta Marine, Den Helder, Netherlands. Curacao-flagged. Built by Sainty Yangzhou Shipbuilding, Yangzhou, China in 2010. 

Wednesday, 20 September 2017

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Havana, Cuba as described by the commanding officer f the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Havana, Cuba. It was the first harbour where the coal bunker procedure was mechanized. The Havana Coal Company possessed large lighters fitted out with a coal lift comparable with the system of a bucket dredger. The buckets were fitted to a chain of which the ends were connected to each other. The buckets were emptied via a flexible iron tube into the loading ports of the bunkers. This loading went very fast although there was a problem with the arrangement of the bunkers on board of the Holland. The tube had to be moved when a bunker was full and this went considerable slow. On both sides of the ship was the coal loaded resulting in 480 tons in 8 hour or 60 ton/hour. 

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920. 

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917.

Coal bunker procedure in the harbour of Curacao, Dutch West Indies as described by the commanding officer of the Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland in 1917


The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. Her commanding officer described in his report the coal bunker procedure followed at Curacao, Dutch West Indies. The ship was moored alongside the coal quay and via 2 gangways were baskets filled with 25-30 kilo coals carried by dock coolies. In around 8 net hours was in this manner 645 ton loaded or around 80 tons a hour. In the first hour went the loading much faster in contrary to the last hours.

Note
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland visited La Luz, Gran Canaria in December 1916


Dutch Hr. Ms. Holland

Spanish Princesa de Asturias

The Dutch protected cruiser Hr. Ms. Holland (1) captain J.H. Zeeman departed on 2 December 1916 at 11.40 o’clock the roads of Nieuwediep, Netherlands towards the Dutch West Indies. On the 13th she arrived at Vigo, continuing her voyage on the 19th towards Las Palmas/La Luz, Gran Canaria where she arrived on the 23rd, after bunkering coal she left the next day arrived at Curacao, Dutch West Indies on 7 January 1917 at 09.00 ‘’clock. At La Luz were warships no longer allowed to enter the inner harbour. There was however made an exception for the Holland under the excuse that the sea in the outer harbour was to heavy for bunkering. The major space in the inner harbour was now by 14 large German and Austrian steamships. Some time ordered the Spanish government those ships were to leave the roads where the major part had been lying since the outbreak of the war. When the Holland was in the outer harbour the Spanish ironclad Princesa de Asturias (2) lying departed in the morning of the 24th and replaced by the shortly afterwards arriving gunboat Laya.(3) With the commander of the Princesa de Asturias captain Francisco de Barredio y Mirandio were visits exchanged. Coal bunkering was by the Dutch commander as follows described. Prows loaded with coal sacks weighing around 100 kilo were lying waiting to be called. Between the prow and the ship to be loaded was a boat fitted out with 2 steam winches lying. This boat was able to lift 8 sacks of coal or about 800 kilo at once. On board was with the help of convenient carts the coal loaded in the bunkers and within 9 hours 554 ton coal bunkered.

Notes
1. Of the Holland-class protected cruisers consisting of the Holland, Zeeland and Friesland as the 1st subclass and the Gelderland, Noord-Brabant and Utrecht of the 2nd subclass. Laid down at the Rijkswerf Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1895, launched on 4 October 1896, commissioned on 1 July 1898 and sold on a public auction at 11.00 o’clock the navy yard at Willemsoord, Netherlands on Wednesday 21 January 1920 .
2. Of the Princesa de Asturias class armoured cruisers consisting of the Princesa de Asturias, Cataluna and Cardenal de Cisneros. Laid down by Arsenal de la Caracca, Spain on 23 September 1889, launched on 17 October 1896, completed on 10 June 1903 and stricken in December 1927.
3. Of the Recalde-class consisting of the Recalde, Laya, Bonifaz and Lauria. Laid down by SECN, Cartagena, Spain in December 1910, launched on 3 April 1912, completed in August 1912 and stricken in May 1940.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1916-1917. 

Torpedoes trimmed in the Dutch East Indies according to the Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1887-1888

An item reported that in 1886-1887 the Royal Netherlands Navy tested two in the Netherlands prepared fish torpedoes in the Dutch East Indies to become aware what the effects were of a political climate. It became clear after examining the torpedoes that these were no longer in ready condition. The vertical rudders needed to be trimmed, the torpedoes disassembled, cleaned and trimmed again to get the same launch results as before the torpedoes were shipped. It became clear that it had no use to prepare torpedoes in the Netherlands which were to be used in the Dutch East Indies. Instead cleaning and trimming was to be done in the Dutch East Indies. 

The Haitian navy according to the commanding officer of the Dutch screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in 1887

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh

Dutch Zr. Ms. Atjeh. Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original source

Dutch Zr. Ms. Koningin Emma der Nederlanden

The Dutch screw steamship 1st class Zr. Ms. Atjeh (1) commanded by captain C.H. Bogaert was in 1886 in the Dutch West Indies stationed until she was replaced by the screw steamship 1st class Koningin Emma der Nederland (2) on 14 February 1887. The next day departed the Atjeh towards the Netherlands. On 5 March 1887 anchored the Koningin Emma der Nederlanden in the roads of Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Her salute of 21 gunshots was answered with a 17 gunshots salute, the maximum what the Haitian government did. Within short time arrived the adjutant of the Haitian admiral Robbert Cooper (3), who was a son of the American admiral Cooper. The adjutant reported that the admiralship of the Haitian navy, the Dessalines, which flying a vice-admirals flag, was not able to return a salute while she just was armed with 4 guns and the ram ship Toussaint Louverture (4) and the advice yacht in the inner roads had just one gun. The Dessalines never steamed while she had to stay in the reads of Port-au-Prince as escape possibility for the president. Both other two small ships could even not steam and had complete native crews including officers. The 7th arrived the British HMS Canada (5) captain L.A. Beaumont flying a vice-admirals flag coming from Barbados. On the 10th was Port-au-Prince left.

Notes
1. Also called frigate. Call sign GQCN. Laid down at the navy yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 3 March 1875, launched on 6 December 1876, commissioned on 1 November 1877, converted into a an accommodation ship at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands in 1906. Commissioned while replacing the Het Loo in 1908, also used as floating battery for salutes by replacing the 12cm by 7,5cm guns since 1910, further more used for training sailors of the Royal Naval Reserve at Willemsoord, Netherlands until 21 May 1921, decommissioned and since then used as accommodation ship for the air service at Willemsoord, Netherlands, disarmed until 1922, disarmed and stricken in 1929 and finally sold to the N.V. Frank Rijsdijk‘s industrieële onderneming at Hendrik Ido Ambacht, Netherlands for ƒ 23.501,00 to be broken up in May 1935.
2. Also called frigate, call sign GQMF, on stocks as De Ruyter at the naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 6 November 1876, completed for the half on 31 October 1876, renamed Koningin Emma der Nederlanden on 7 January 1879, launched on 20 January 1879, commissioned on 1 December 1881, decommissioned on 22 May 1896 for repairs, commissioned on 16 June 1897, decommissioned on23 June 1900, converted at the shipyard De Lastdrager at Den Helder, Netherlands into an accommodation ship in 1908, commissioned on 16 November 1908, guard ship at Willemsoord, Netherlands in 1920, captured by the German forces at Willemsoord on 14 May 1940, capsized and sunk at Den Helder in 1942, salvaged in April 1943 and scuttled north of Fort Harssens.
3. Rear admiral George H. Cooper (27 July 1821 USA New York-17 November 1891 Brooklyn, New York, USA) of the US Navy, served in the navy between 1836-1884.
4. Launched by the Societé des forges et Chantiers, France in 1886. His son Mason S. Cooper (1847Portsmouth, Virgiania, USA-2 January 1891, Brooklyn, New York, YSA) was admiral in the Haitian navy.
5. Comus-class screw steam corvette, laid down at the Portsmouth Dockyard, England in 1879, launched on 26 August 1881, completed in 1881, reserve since December 1896 and sold in 1897.

Source
Jaarboek van de Koninklijke Nederlandsche Zeemacht 1886-1887. 

Swedish galley Vellingk 1725-1758

Built at Vastervik in 1725, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Lidingon 1725-1758

Built at Lidingo in 1725, last mentioned inI 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Cronhielm 1725-1755

Built at Stockholm in 1725, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Tovalite1721-1755

Built at Ladugardslandet in 1721, last mentioned between >1751-1755<. {

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933

Swedish galley Ormen 1721-1755

Built at Vastervik in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Tuesday, 19 September 2017

Chinese guided missile frigate Yangzhou (578) 2013-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Added to the East China Fleet on 21 September 2015. Launched by Hudong-Zhonghua Shipbuilding Co., Ltd. In September 2013 and finished her sea trials in June 2015. Type 054A multi purpose class frigates, called by the NARO Jiangkai II. The first commissioned in 2007 of at least 24. Difference with the 054 Type are improved sensors and weapons. Displacement 4.053 tons (full) and as dimensions 134,1 x 16 metres or 440 x 52 feet. Machinery consists of CODAD 4x7.600hp Shaanxi 16PA6 STC diesels allowing an estimated speed of 27 knots. Estimated range is 8.025 nautical miles. Crew numbers 165 men. Able to carry a Kamov Ka-28 Helix or Harbin Z-9C helicopter with her for which a hangar is available. Armament consists of 1-32-cell vertical launching system HQ-16 SAM , Yu-8 anti submarine rocket launchers, 2x4 C-803 anti-ship/land attack missiles, 1-7,6cm PJ26 dual purpose gun, 2-3cm Type730 7-barrel CIWS guns or Type 1130, 2x3-32,4cm Yu-7 anti submarine warfare (ASW) torpedoes, 2x6 Type 87 24cm anti submarine rocket launcher with 36 rockets and 2 Type 726-4 18-tube decoy launchers. 

Chinese guided missile frigate Huanggang (577) 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Type 054A multi purpose class frigates, called by the NARO Jiangkai II. The first commissioned in 2007 of at least 24. Difference with the 054 Type are improved sensors and weapons. Displacement 4.053 tons (full) and as dimensions 134,1 x 16 metres or 440 x 52 feet. Machinery consists of CODAD 4x7.600hp Shaanxi 16PA6 STC diesels allowing an estimated speed of 27 knots. Estimated range is 8.025 nautical miles. Crew numbers 165 men. Able to carry a Kamov Ka-28 Helix or Harbin Z-9C helicopter with her for which a hangar is available. Armament consists of 1-32-cell vertical launching system HQ-16 SAM , Yu-8 anti submarine rocket launchers, 2x4 C-803 anti-ship/land attack missiles, 1-7,6cm PJ26 dual purpose gun, 2-3cm Type730 7-barrel CIWS guns or Type 1130, 2x3-32,4cm Yu-7 anti submarine warfare (ASW) torpedoes, 2x6 Type 87 24cm anti submarine rocket launcher with 36 rockets and 2 Type 726-4 18-tube decoy launchers. Commissioned in January 2015. Part of the East Sea Fleet. 

Chinese replenishment ship Gaoyouhu (966) 2014-




Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 September 2017

Qiandoahu-class Type903 replenishment class called by the NATO Fuchi consists of the Qiandaohu and the Weishanhu and Type903A namely the Taihu, Chaohu, Dongpinhu, Gaayouhu, Luomahu and Honghu. The Gaoyouhu belonged to the East Sea Fleet. Launched by COMEC (GSSC Offshore&Marine Engineering Company Limited) on 30 December 2014 and commissioned on 25 January 2016. Displacement 23.400 tons and as dimensions 178,5 x 24,8 x 8,7 metres. The machinery consists of 2diesels supplying via 2 shafts 24.000hp allowing a speed of 20 knots. With a speed of 14 knots is the range 10.000 nautical miles. Cargo capacity 10.500 tons fuel oil, 250 tons fresh water, 680 tons cargo and ammunition. Her crew numbers 130 men. The armament consisted of 4 H/PJ76F twin 3,7cm guns. There is a hangar and flight deck available for the Z-8 or Z-9 helicopter. 

Dutch steam towing launch Sabangbaai (XD-506) at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde (Town Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands T533)

Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde (Town Archive Vlissingen, Netherlands T506)

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

In July 1946 was Sabangbaai (1) examined while lying in the water. She was for the last time docked in begin 1943. Coal bunkers, raised quarterdeck, closed bulwark and railing were in worse condition. Saloon panelling and deck benches disappeared just like the cargo winch. The hull, thrushes, bulkheads, wood foredeck, top plates of the double bottom and cargo winch on the foredeck were in reasonable condition. The steam boiler was in quite well condition in contrary to the steam engine with auxiliary engines which were worn out although still usable after thoroughly maintenance. The advice was to condemn her while the expectation was that a large number of hull plates at the outside were in a worse condition.

Source
1. Identical to the steel-built double bottomed screw steam tug Sabangbaai  ordered to be built for a price of ƒ 60.000 with additional labour for ƒ 964,30? The real costs were ƒ 74.114,68 causing a loss of ƒ 13.150,33.
Costs hull ƒ 51.3999,85 (stores ƒ 22.017,26-inventory ƒ 4.087,70-wages ƒ 15.890,94-expenses ƒ 9.403,95).
Costs engine no. 206 (16”x 32”:18”, 128 rpm, 322 ihp, weight 11.876 kilo) ƒ 15.458,44 (stores ƒ 9.615,86-inventory ƒ 527,48-wages ƒ 3.156.35-expenses ƒ 2.158,75).
Costs boiler no. 347 (11’0½”x 9’0”, weight 16.260 tons, pressure 120 lbs) ƒ 7.256,39 (ƒ stores ƒ 3.520,61-inventory ƒ 111,62-wages ƒ 2.203,36-ƒexpenses ƒ 11.410,80). At the trial was with 308 hp, a draught of 9’0” and a displacement of 342 tons a speed of 9,71 knots achieved. The dimensions according to the contract were 100’ (between perpendiculars) x 20; (midship section) x 11’(hold midship section). The draught was to be 9’ with a displacement of 213 tons included coal, water and 150 ton cargo. The engine had to be a vertical two-cylinder compound steam engine. Specifications according to the order card system (Archive Kon. Mij. De Schelde) 30,48 (between perpendiculars)-32,21 (over all) x 6,10 x 2,74 x 3,25 (hold) metres or 100’0”-105’8” x 20’0” x 9’0” x 11’0”. At the launching was her displacement 140 tons with a draught of 2’11” (fore)-5’10”(aft). Coal bunker capacity 53 ton. Water ballast capacity 54 ton. Tonnage 200,68 tons, 79,8 met, deadweight 138 ton and displacement 342 ton. Her building as the Generaal van Heutsz at the shipyard of the Kon.Mij. De Schelde at Vlissingen, Netherlands by the N.V. Zeehaven Kolenstation Sabang, Amsterdam, Netherlands was ordered on 15 October 1902, laid down by engineer J. Janszen jr. with yard number 104 below the roof at the Noordwal on 6 January 1903, in the thrushes on 31 January, plating fitted on 24 March, launched on 24 March, trial while berthed on 6 April, trial on 11 April and delivered and departure towards the Dutch East Indies on the 13th.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motor tug Maggy (XT-538) at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

For the last time docked in September 1939. In July 1946 examined while in the water. Hull on waterline, wood and steel deck, connection superstructure and deck and bulwark in worse condition. The 120hp engine was useless. The rest of the casco in reasonable condition although it was to be feared that the hull below the waterline was also in worse condition. Except for major repairs was also the foundation to be altered to make it possible to fit her out with a new engine. Due to the large costs was it advice not to repair her and to commission again.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch motor craft XH-538 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull reasonable. Engine needed thoroughly repairs. Ship overall needed many repairs. Was a small pleasure craft. If needed elsewhere to be shipped

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch harbour motor vessel XH-539 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull worse. Machinery needed thoroughly repairs. The whole vessel needed repairs. If needed elsewhere to be shipped.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch personnel open landing crafts N-105, 106 and 107at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of hull extra ordinary worse. Two engines were to be shipped towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague.

Dutch motor vessel XL-1002 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Decommissioned. Hull could not be repaired at Sabang. Condition of the machinery was reasonable. Belonged to the army (K.N.I.L.) for patrol and communication tasks. Authorization was given to break up. For the time being used as accommodation ship at Balchan. Wood-built.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch patrol vessel XA-1011 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Condition of the hull reasonable. Condition of machinery could not yet be examined. Used by the harbour for NEFIS (intelligence) tasks.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch coal lighter XR-551 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Fitted out with a 30 tons sheerleg. Hull in extra ordinary worse condition, underwater ship could not be controlled. Used by the harbourmaster for lifting heavy parts.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Dutch lighter XR-522 at Sabang, Dutch East Indies on 1 August 1946

In 1946 ordered the Dutch supreme commanding officer in the Far East by order no. 62 to investigate the harbours including shipyards in the Dutch East Indies and Netherlands New Guinea. In those so-called Sitraps (Situation reports) was information collected dealing with the available facilities, personnel and vessels/boats. The Dutch East Indies fell in Japanese hands in the Second World War when the Dutch forces surrendered on 8 March 1942 until Japan surrendered on her turn on 15 August 1945. On 17 August 1945 declared nationalistic leaders like Soekarno and Hadda the independence of what was called the Republik Indonesia. The result was a struggle for years before the Netherlands forced by international pressure accepted the Indonesian independence on 29 December 1949.

Steel made. Lacking hatches. Condition of hull reasonable. Used by the harbourmaster as lighter.

Source
Archive Dutch Marinestaf (1942) 1945-1948 inventory number 194, National Archive, The Hague. 

Hulls of Dutch submarines needed to be more smooth according to an advice in 1922


Copyright Archive Municipalty Archive Vlissingen 413.40/FA11887

On 21 January 1922 send the inspector of the submarine service Gerard Lodewijk Schorer stationed at Den Helder, Netherlands an advice to the naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands dealing with the smoothness of the hulls of submarines and the effects on the range and speed. The Dutch submarines Hr. Ms. K III and K IV were compared with a Spanish submarines which had complete similar lines. It became again obvious how important the smoothness of hull was and to prevent at least as much protruding parts despite the wishes of some commanding officers. Submerged speed and range were of the highest importance seen from defensive and offensive view and just in time in upmost emergency to be neglected.

The submerged achievements were:
Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. K III with as much removed as possible except for the telegraph and compass and one periscope out, front rudders out with 281/271 rpm and 390kW a speed of 8,42 miles.

The Dutch submarine Hr. Ms. K IV with railing on the bridge and minesweeping rigging, front rudders out and one periscope out and with 271 romp and 363 KW a speed of 7,88 miles.

The anonymous Spanish submarine with the same lines as the Dutch K III, all rigging removed, front rudders in, 2 periscopes out, with 390 KW and 198rpm a speed of 9,15 miles, with 363 KW and 193rpm a speed of 8,95 miles and with 300 KW and 1180rpm a speed of 8,42 miles.

The general conclusion was that the Spanish was more efficient, with a speed of 7,86 miles was just 2/3 of the horsepower of the  K IV needed, meaning that with a similar battery the range was factor 1,5 of the Dutch submarine. So it was a necessity to prevent protruding parts.

Achievements while surfaced:
KIII with a displacement of 580 ton, a speed of 16,332 miles with 439rpm and 868+832hp
KIV with a displacement of 578 ton, a speed of 14,24 miles with 401 rpm, 2x600hp
Spanish submarine with a d displacement of 555 ton, a speed of 16,49 miles with 380rpm and 2x700hp.

Notes
1. Built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 161. Electric Boat Company design. Supervisor H.H. Johnstone of the E.B.C. Ordered on 24 July 1914, contact signed in November 1914, keel laid down in the shed on the Noordwal on 15 July 1915, launched on 12 August 1919, trial on 3 April 1920, delivered on 9 July 1920 and stricken in March 1937. Displacement 582,690 (surfaced)-720,90 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 64,084 x 5.526 x 4.856 metres. An armament of 6-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoes were carried.
2. Built by Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands with yard number 164. Electric Boat Company design. Supervisor H.H. Johnstone of the E.B.C. Ordered in October 1915, keel laid down in the shed on the Noordwal on 30 December 1915, launched on 2 July 1920, trial on 20 January 1921, delivered on 27 April 1921 and stricken in March 1937. Displacement 582,690 (surfaced)-720,90 (submerged) tons and as dimensions 64,084 x 5.526 x 4.856 metres. An armament of 6-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoes were carried.
3. This must be a B-class submarine consisting of the B-1/B-6 built between 1921-1923 by at SECN-Sociedad Espagnola de Construcciones Navales, Cartagena, Spain. Displacement 556 (submerged)-740 (surfaced) tons and as dimensions 64.1 x 5.6 x 5.2 metres. Armament consisted of 4-45cm/17.7” torpedo tubes (2xbow, 2x stern), for which 8 torpedoes were carried and 1-7,6cm anti aircraft gun.

Source
Archive Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague 2.12.18) inventory number 293. 

Monday, 18 September 2017

Swedish galley Lustig 1721-1755

Built at Tyresion, Sweden in  1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Hurtig 1721-1755

Built at Tyresion, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Snall 1721-1755

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Bestandig 1721-1755

Built at Stockholm or Lidingo, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1755. {342}.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Vaksam 1721-1758

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Stabi 1721-1758

Built at Norrkoping, Sweden in 1721, last mentioned in 1758.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish galley Horn 1720-1761

Built at Stockholm, Sweden in 1720, last mentioned in 1761.

Source
O. Nikula. Skargardsflottan benämnda fartyg 1756-1791. Svenska skärgärdsflottan 1756-1791. Helsinki, 1933. 

Swedish oil/chemical tanker Fure West 2006-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Faroe Islands-flagged, homeport Nolsoy, IMO 9301873, MMSI 231775000 and call sign OZ2100. Owned and managed by Firetank Rederi, Donso, Sweden. Built by Edward Shipyard, Shanghai, China in 2006. 

British oil/chemical tanker Crystal Diamond 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, IMO 9327059, MMSI 248078000 and call sign 9HA2165. Owned by Crystal Pool UK, London, United Kingdom and managed by Crystal Pool, Genoa, Italy. Built by Sekwang Heavy Industries Ulsan, Ulsan, South Korea in 2008. 

Greek oil/chemical tanker Nave Polaris 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Marshall Islands-flagged, homeport Majuro, IMO 9457749, MMSI 538004188 and call sign V7VQ6. Built by Dae Sum Shipbuilding&Engineering, Pusan, South Korea in 2011. Owned and managed by Navios Tankers Management, Athens, Greece. 

German research/survey vessel Meridian 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9299977, MMSI 23651000 and call sign ZDJC9. Owned and managed by Fugro Osea, Bremen, Germany. Built by Damen Shipyard Hardinxveld, Hardinxveld-Giessendam, Netherlands in 2003. 

Monaco oil chemical tanker Lafayette Bay 2015-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 September 2017

Marshall Uslands-flagged, Majuro, IMO 9717785, MMSI 538005536 and call sign V7EU6. Built by by SPP Shipbuilding Sacehon Shipyard, Sacheon, South Korea in 2015. as the SPP Sacheon S1166. Owned by Lafayette Bay Shipping LLC. Monaco and operated by Scorpio Marine Management (India) Pvt. Ltd.