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Wednesday, 10 February 2016

Singapore crude oil tanker Eagle Turin 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2015

Singapore-flagged, IMO 9360465, MMSI 565770000 and call sign 9VMG6. Built at the Koyo Dockyard, Mihara, Japan in 2008. Owned by AET Tankers, Singapore and managed by AET, Hamilton, Bermuda.

Japanese car carrier Southern Highway 2008-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9338632, MMSI 356580000 and call sign 3EOJ8. Built at the Shin Kurushima Onishi Shipyard, Imabari, Japan in 2008 .Managed and owned by Taiyo Nippon Kisen, Kobe, Japan.

Dutch euro cutter Boeier (SCH-18) 2000-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 February 2015

Netherlands-flagged, registration number NLD200002610, IMO 9223083, MMSI 245370000 and call sign PFBM. Casco built at the Cenal Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland and completed at Padmos, Stellendam, Netherlands with yard number 158 in 2000. Owned by P. Knoester Jr. bv (Jaczon SCH), The Hague, Netherlands.

Dutch general cargo ship Milady 2005-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 February 2015

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9319430, MMSI 236307000 and call sign ZDHE6. Managed and owned by Briese Shipping, Scheemda, Netherlands. Built by Damen Shipyard Bergum, Bergum, Netherlands in 2005.

German tug (ex-Triton Responder 2011, Oceanus 2011) Fairplay 32 2011-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 1 February 2016

Malta-flagged, IMO 9476018, MMSI 249188000 and call sign 9HA4144. Gross tonnage 1.374 tons, displacement 331 tons and as dimensions 48,88 x 14,06 metres. Built by Daewoo Mangalia Heavy Industries, Mangalia, Romania in 2011. Owned and managed by Fairplay Towage, Hamburg, Germany. Ex-Triton Responder renamed May 2011 and Oceanus renamed November 2011. Other sources claiming Antigua&Barbuda-flagged with as MMSI 3053580000

Italian dreadnought battleship Dante Alighieri 1909-1928


First Italian dreadnought battleship. Preceded by the Regina Elena-class and succeeded by the Conte di Cavour-class. Laid down at the Castellammare di Stabia navy yard on 6 June 1909, launched on 20 August 1910, completed on 15 January 1913, modernized in 1923, stricken on 1 July 1928 and finally broken up in that same year. She was designed by the Italian rear admiral engineer Edoardo Masdea (1) at that moment Chief Constructor of the Italian navy using the ideas of general Vittorio Cuniberti (2). The intention was to built a battleship with a main armament of the same calibre to be used for broadside fire and as much possible limited superstructure.

Displacement 19.522 tonnes/19.243 long tons (normal load)-21.600 tonnes/21.300 long tons (deep load) and as dimensions 158,4 (waterline)-168,1 (overall) x 26,6 x 8,8 metres or 519.8-551.6 x 87.3 x 28.10 feet. Steered by two rudders, one behind the other. Four Parsons steam turbines and 23 Blechynden water-tube boilers (7 oil-fired and 16 oil/coal-fired) supplying via 4 shafts a horsepower of 32.190 shp (trials)-35.000 (design) allowing a speed of 22,83 (trial)-23 (design). The boilers were divided over two boiler rooms each with two funnels. The turbines were positioned between the two center gun turrets. Range with a maximum coal bunker capacity of 3.000 tons and further an unknown bunker capacity of fuel oil was 4.800 nautical miles wit a speed of 10 knots and with 22 knots just 1.000 nautical miles. The armour consisted of a waterline belt maximal 25,4cm/10” thick with an armoured deck pf 3,8cm/1.5” thickness. The 30,5cm gun turrets, secondary gun turrets, casemates and conning towers were protected by respectively 25,4cm (maximum), 9,8cm/3.9”, 9,8/3.9” and 30,5cm/12”. Her crew numbered 981 men.

Notes
1. Edoard Masdea (23 July 1849 Naples, Italy-12 May 1910 Rome, Italy) also responsible for the Pisani, Giuseppi Garibaldi, Pisa and San Giorgio classes.
.2 Vittorio Emanuele Cuniberti (7 June 1854 Turin, Italy-20 December 1913 Rome, Italy), the chairman of the board for designing ships. As a young naval engineer he was the friend and best scholar of the famous Italian naval engineer Benedetto Brin.

British Royal Navy ordered building River-class destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the Marine Rundschau reporting that of the 14 destroyers part of the British naval program 1904-1904 one destroyer of the River-design was built by Yarrow as speculation and now bought by the Royal British Navy. The other destroyers were to be built using new designs and probably fitted out with turbines and achieving a speed of 30-36 miles.

Italian navy not building turbine machinery driven ships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reporting that the Italian navy decided not toe built ships fitted out with turbines considered the results in the USA and England.

Russian and French shipyards building for Russian navy large number of destroyers and an armoured cruiser according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reporting that the Russian government ordered at the French shipyards Forges etc Chantiers de la Méditerranée one armoured cruiser of the Bayan type and 2 destroyers. Russian shipyards were building 18-500 ton destroyers with a speed of 25 miles.

Brazil wanted to built 6 battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the Army and Navy Journal reporting that the Brazilian cabinet presented the Senate a shipbuilding program which if it was approved was the largest program in South America. It consisted of 6-13.000 ton battleships in general resembling the British 11.8000 ton battleship HMS Triumph. Furthermore 3-9.500 armoured cruisers of the Russian Bayan-type, 6-400 ton destroyers, 6-300 ton torpedo boats, 6-50 ton torpedo boats, 3 submarines and 1-6.000 tons transport.

Problems with watertight bulkheads on board of British warships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen a.d.G.d.S. reported that the watertight bulkheads in some of the latest British warships of the Channel Fleet should not to be watertight. Tests proved that when water was let in, the bulkheads moved. More tests were to be executed.

Tuesday, 9 February 2016

Portugal needed at least 4 battleships to be able to defend her empire according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1890-1891 no. 3

An item referred to the Army and Navy Gazette reporting that the Portuguese navy needed for defending Portugal and the Portuguese empire was to consist of at least 4 battleships, 10 cruisers, 18 gunboats 1st class and 1 sail training ship

German dreadnought battleship SMS Oldenburg 1909-1921


Of the Helgoland-class consisting of the Helgoland, Ostfriesland, Thüringen and Oldenburg. Preceded by the Nassau-class and succeeded by the Kaiser-class. Originally to be built at the Schichau Werke, Danzig, Germany with yard number 828 but her building was not earlier ordered as in 1909 although before approval of the 1909 budget. Laid down on the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven as the Ersatz Frithjof on 1 March 1909, Launched on 30 June 1910, incomplete transported to Kiel, Germany to be completed, commissioned on 1 May 1912, stricken from the navy list on 5 November 1919, handed over to Japan according to the Treaty of Versailles as the “M” to compensate the German warships scuttled at Scapa Flow on 13 May 1920, of no use for the Japanese navy was she sold to a British breaking firm in June 1920 although broken up at Dordrecht, Netherlands in 1921. Building costs 45.801.000 gold marks.

General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 22.808 tons/22.448 long tons (design)-24.700 tons/24.300 long tons (full load) and as dimensions 167,20 (over all) x 28,50 x 8,94 metres or 548.7 x 93.6 x 29.4 feet. The 3 shaft 4 cylinder vertical triple engines divided over 3 engine rooms and 12 boilers supplied 27.617-35.104 (trials) ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 -21,3 (trials) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.500 nautical miles. Originally a bunker capacity of 3.200 ton/3.150 long tons coal increased later with 197 tons/194 long tons oil which was sprayed over the coal to obtain a higher burn rate. The crew numbered 1.1113 men. The armament consisted of 6x2-30,5cm/12.0” L/50 quick firing guns, 14-15cm/5.9” L/45 quick firing guns, 14-8,8cm/3.5” L/45 quick firing guns (after 1914 were 2 of these guns replaced by 2-8,8cm Flag guns and between 1916-1916 were the another 1 guns removed) and 6-50cm/20” submerged torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1x stern, 2 each broadside). The armour consisted of a 30cm/12” thick belt, 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck with the barbettes and gun turrets protected by 30cm thick armour.

German dreadnought battleship SMS Thüringen 1908-1921


Of the Helgoland-class consisting of the Helgoland, Ostfriesland, Thüringen and Oldenburg. Preceded by the Nassau-class and succeeded by the Kaiser-class. Laid down at AG Weser. Dockyard, Bremen, Germany as the Ersatz Beowulf with yard number 166 on 2 November 1908, launched on 27 November 1909, commissioned on 1 July 1911, decommissioned on 16 December 1918, stricken from the navy list on 5 November 1919, handed over to France according to the Treaty of Versailles as the “L” and to compensate the German warships scuttled at Scapa Flow on 29 April 1920, brought to Cherbourg, France, used as target ship and sunk off Gravres and broken up in situ between 1923-1933 although still parts can be seen off the French coast. Building costs 46.314.000 gold marks.

General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 22.808 tons/22.448 long tons (design)-24.700 tons/24.300 long tons (full load) and as dimensions 167,20 (over all) x 28,50 x 8,94 metres or 548.7 x 93.6 x 29.4 feet. The 3 shaft 4 cylinder vertical triple engines divided over 3 engine rooms and 12 boilers supplied 27.617-35.104 (trials) ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 -21,3 (trials) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.500 nautical miles. Originally a bunker capacity of 3.200 ton/3.150 long tons coal increased later with 197 tons/194 long tons oil which was sprayed over the coal to obtain a higher burn rate. The crew numbered 1.1113 men. The armament consisted of 6x2-30,5cm/12.0” L/50 quick firing guns, 14-15cm/5.9” L/45 quick firing guns, 14-8,8cm/3.5” L/45 quick firing guns (after 1914 were 2 of these guns replaced by 2-8,8cm Flag guns and between 1916-1916 were the another 1 guns removed) and 6-50cm/20” submerged torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1x stern, 2 each broadside). The armour consisted of a 30cm/12” thick belt, 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck with the barbettes and gun turrets protected by 30cm thick armour.

German dreadnought battleship SMS Ostfriesland 1908-1921


Of the Helgoland-class consisting of the Helgoland, Ostfriesland, Thüringen and Oldenburg. Preceded by the Nassau-class and succeeded by the Kaiser-class. Laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Wilhelmshaven as the Ersatz Oldenburg with yard number 31on 19 October 1908, launched on 30 September 1909, commissioned on 1 Augustus 1911, in service on 22 September 1911, stricken from the navy list on 5 November 1919, handed over to the USA according to the Treaty of Versailles and to compensate the German warships scuttled at Scapa Flow as the “H”, departed Germany on 7 April 1920 with a German crew towards to Rosyth, Scotland and from there on 9 April by an American crew to the USA and sunk on 21 July 1921 while used as target ship by bombers off Cape Hatteras. Building costs 43.579.000 gold marks.

General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 22.808 tons/22.448 long tons (design)-24.700 tons/24.300 long tons (full load) and as dimensions 167,20 (over all) x 28,50 x 8,94 metres or 548.7 x 93.6 x 29.4 feet. The 3 shaft 4 cylinder vertical triple engines divided over 3 engine rooms and 12 boilers supplied 27.617-35.104 (trials) ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 -21,3 (trials) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.500 nautical miles. Originally a bunker capacity of 3.200 ton/3.150 long tons coal increased later with 197 tons/194 long tons oil which was sprayed over the coal to obtain a higher burn rate. The crew numbered 1.1113 men. The armament consisted of 6x2-30,5cm/12.0” L/50 quick firing guns, 14-15cm/5.9” L/45 quick firing guns, 14-8,8cm/3.5” L/45 quick firing guns (after 1914 were 2 of these guns replaced by 2-8,8cm Flag guns and between 1916-1916 were the another 1 guns removed) and 6-50cm/20” submerged torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1x stern, 2 each broadside). The armour consisted of a 30cm/12” thick belt, 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck with the barbettes and gun turrets protected by 30cm thick armour.

German dreadnought battleship SMS Helgoland 1908-1921


Of the Helgoland-class consisting of the Helgoland, Ostfriesland, Thüringen and Oldenburg. Preceded by the Nassau-class and succeeded by the Kaiser-class. Laid down at Howaldtswerke Werft, Kiel, Germany with yard number 500 as th Ersatz Siegfried on 11 November 1908, launched on 25 September 1909, commissioned on 23 August 1911, dismissed from German active service on 16 December 1918, stricken from the navy list on 5 November 1919, handed over to the United Kingdom according to the Treaty of Versailles and to compensate the German warships scuttled at Scapa Flow on 5 August 1920 and broken up at Morecambe, England starting on 3 March 1921.

General technical specifications of this class. Displacement 22.808 tons/22.448 long tons (design)-24.700 tons/24.300 long tons (full load) and as dimensions 167,20 (over all) x 28,50 x 8,94 metres or 548.7 x 93.6 x 29.4 feet. The 3 shaft 4 cylinder vertical triple engines divided over 3 engine rooms and 12 boilers supplied 27.617-35.104 (trials) ihp allowing a speed of 20,5 -21,3 (trials) knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 5.500 nautical miles. Originally a bunker capacity of 3.200 ton/3.150 long tons coal increased later with 197 tons/194 long tons oil which was sprayed over the coal to obtain a higher burn rate. The crew numbered 1.1113 men. The armament consisted of 6x2-30,5cm/12.0” L/50 quick firing guns, 14-15cm/5.9” L/45 quick firing guns, 14-8,8cm/3.5” L/45 quick firing guns (after 1914 were 2 of these guns replaced by 2-8,8cm Flag guns and between 1916-1916 were the another 1 guns removed) and 6-50cm/20” submerged torpedo tubes (1x bow, 1x stern, 2 each broadside). The armour consisted of a 30cm/12” thick belt, 6,3cm/2.5” thick deck with the barbettes and gun turrets protected by 30cm thick armour.

German cruiser SMS Frauenlob launched according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 5

Library of Congress. Original link

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht reporting the launching of the German 4th class cruiser build as “G” and now christened Frauenlob. Dimensions 100 (between perpendiculars) x 11,80 x 4,90 metres and a displacement of 2.650 ton. She was divided in 15 watertight compartments. Armour consisted of a 3,7-5cm thick deck. Two vertical triple expansion engines supplied 6.000 with natural and 8.000 with forced draft allowing a speed of 21,5 knots. With an economic speed and the coal bunker capacity of 550 ton was the range 5.000 nautical miles. Her crew numbered 250 men. The armament consisted of 10-10,5cm guns, 14-3,7cm guns, 4 machineguns and 2 submerged torpedo launchers on the broadside.(1)

Note
1. Of the Gazelle-class. Building ordered in summer 1901, laid down at the AG Weser dockyard, Bremen, Germany with yard number 132 in 1901, launched on 22 March 1902, commissioned on 17 February 1903 and torpedoed and sunk at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916.

Former French minister of navy Lockroy thought balloons best means tracing submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1903-1903 no.6

An item reported that according to an article of the former French minister of navy Lockroy in the newspaper Matin controlled balloons the best instrument to search for submarines while even the submarine dived deep she still could be seen from out of the air.(1)

Note
1. Édouard Lockroy (18 July 1838 Paris, France-22 November 1913 Paris, France), member of the Radical party, he was minister of marine in 1895-1899 and as vice president of the Chamber he criticized Camille Pelletan which was minister between 1902-1905.

Admiral Beresford criticised British Royal Navy organisation according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 5

An item reported that admiral Beresford (1) criticised the British naval organisation although suggestions what could be improved. The main points were to get of the many nonvaleurs between the ships, large increase of the coal bunker storage at the several stations while when Fashoda (2) found place it impossible was to maintain an important force in the Mediterranean, seriously examination of the mobilisation conditions and appointing specialists as head of the several bureaus.

Notes
1. Charles William de la Poer Beresford, 1st Baron Beresford (10 February 1846-6 September 1919 Langwell, Berriedale, Caithness)
2. Fashoda Incident of Crisis in 1898 when United Kingdom an France nearly clashed caused by an attempt of France to gain control of the Upper Nile river basin excluding the United Kingdom from the Sudan. The United Kingdom wanted to link her colonies in Southern Africa and East Africa with the Nile basin and for which purpose Sudan was essential. Fashoda [nowadays Kodok] was the cross point of the French and British links.

Danish naval budget 1901-1902 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1902-1903 no. 5

An item reported that the Danish naval budget for 1901-1902 was around 4.689.000 Dutch guilders including around 1 million for new building.

Monday, 8 February 2016

Dutch survey vessel Sc Macaw 2011-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 January 2015

Netherlands-flagged, MMSI 244870590 and call sign PE3127. Total refitted in 2015. Of Sima Charters BV.

Chinese containership Cosco Fortune 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 January 2015

Hong Kong (China-flagged), homeport Hong Kong, IMO 9472127, MMSI 477065200 and call sign VRKE9. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 2012. Owned by Ciscon, Shanghai, China and managed by Seaspan Shipmanagement, Vancouver, Canada.

Dutch suction dredger (ex-Nordlands Fjord 1975-1982, Terkol 1982-1985, Kuddl 1985-1986, Terkol 1986-1990, Baltic Kies I 100-2003) Interballast I 2003-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 January 2015

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Sas van Gent, Netherlands, IMO 7382457, MMSI 246170000 and call sign PBEF. Built at the Vard Brattvaag, Braatvaag, Norway in 1975. Ex-Nordlandsfjord renamed 5 November 1982, Terkol renamed 25 September 1985, Kuddl renamed 15 July 1986, Terkol renamed 7 December 1990 and Baltic Kies I renamed May 2003.

Chinese containership (ex-Saudi Jubal 1999-2002) MSC Matilde 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 25 January 2015

Panama-flagged, IMO 9181663, MMSI 353719000 and call sign HODP. Ex-Saudi Jubal renamed April 2002. Built by Samsung Shipbuilding&Heavy Industries, Geoje, South Korea in 1999. Managed and owned by MSCH Shipmanagement Hong Kong, Hong Kong, China.

Preliminary design for the American battleship No. 40 [New Mexico] dated 6 October 1913


Drawing S 584-34 made by the Bureau of Construction and repair for a battleship to be built under fiscal year 1915. One of the five preliminary designs made for the New Mexico-class battleships (1) and sent to the Executive Committee of the Navy’s General Board on 10 October 1913.

Normal displacement 31.000 ton: hull complete 13.381 ton, hull fittings 1.300 ton, protection 8.831 ton, steam engineering 2.400 ton, reserve feed 2/3 supply 221 ton, battery 1.110 ton, ammunition& 2/3 ordnance stores 989 ton, equipment&2/3 equipment stores and outfir&2/3 stores 1.073 ton, oil fuel supply 1.386 ton and margin 309 ton. Dimensions 600’ x 94.0’ (outside of plating) x 29.25’. Block coefficient 0.658, longitudinal coefficient 0.671 and midship section coefficient 0.980. Armament consisted of 3x2-16” breech loading guns, 22-5” guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The machinery consisted of turbines and 12 boilers divided over 3 room supplying 35.800 shp allowing a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armour consisted of a main side belt with an extreme width of 17’4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and a thickness of 17-17.19”, barbettes protected by 5.5”(light parts)-16” (heavy parts), turrets 6” (roof)-11 (rear)-11/12.25” (sides)-22.5” (port), conning tower proper and fire control tower by 17”, conning tower tube 6” (light)-17” (heavy), uptake protection 13”, protective deck total 150≠ and splinter deck total thickness 80≠+60≠.

Note
1.The New Mexico (BB-40) was laid down at the New York Navy Yard on 14 October 1915, launched on 13 April 1917 and commissioned on 20 May 1918.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

Preliminary design for the American battleship No. 40 [New Mexico] dated 4 October 1913


Drawing S 584-33 made by the Bureau of Construction and repair for a battleship to be built under fiscal year 1915. One of the five preliminary designs made for the New Mexico-class battleships (1) and sent to the Executive Committee of the Navy’s General Board on 10 October 1913.

Normal displacement 35.500 ton: hull complete 14.928 ton, hull fittings 1.560 ton, protection 10.458 ton, steam engineering 2.550 ton, reserve feed 2/3 supply 223 ton, battery 1.117 ton, ammunition& 2/3 ordnance stores 1.024 ton, equipment&2/3 equipment stores and outfir&2/3 stores 1.155 ton, oil fuel supply 1.651 ton and margin 834 ton. Dimensions 650’ x 95.5’ (outside of plating) x 30.0’. Block coefficient 0.667, longitudinal coefficient 0.681 and midship section coefficient 0.980. Armament consisted of 3x2-16” breech loading guns, 22-5” guns and 4 submerged torpedo tubes. The machinery consisted of turbines and 12 boilers divided over 3 room supplying 38.000 shp allowing a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armour consisted of a main side belt with an extreme width of 17’4 5/8”, depth below waterline 8’6” and thickness of 19” + 11-19”, barbettes protected by 6¼”(light parts)-18” (heavy parts), turrets 7” (roof)-12½ (rear)-12½/14” (sides)-25” (port), conning tower proper and fire control tower by 19”, conning tower tube 6” (light)-19” (heavy), uptake protection 16”, protective deck total 170≠ and splinter deck total thickness 80≠+60≠. Note 1” increase in protective deck increases weight with 740 tons.

Note
1.The New Mexico (BB-40) was laid down at the New York Navy Yard on 14 October 1915, launched on 13 April 1917 and commissioned on 20 May 1918.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

German naval union not satisfied with building program according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item reported that to the German navy budget 1906 a program was added including the building of 6-14.000 (instead of 11.000 ton) armoured cruisers and 7 torpedo boat divisions. His program included the available budget was far less by the wishes of the German Flottenverein (Naval Union). The displacement of the battleships to be laid down in 1906 was also increased just likes the expenses for the (heavier) armament.

New floating target resembling hull of battleship for US Navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 4

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that at New York, USA a floating target was made of the part below the waterline resembled the hull of a battleships. It resembles a big cabinet with a beam of 2 metres and a height of 10 metres. Internal were 12 compartments and a large number of discharging pipes and with at the front 12 pressure meters. The target seemed not to be use to study the effect of gunfire but what damage mines and torpedoes could cause.

French navy fitted major warships out with wireless telegraphy device according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen a.d.G.d.S. reported that the French navy intended to fit all major warships with wireless telegraphy devices. Of the destroyers were all division boat to be fitted out.

Uniforms in British Royal Navy simplified according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 3

An item reported that the uniforms worn by petty officers and sailors in the British Royal Navy were to be simplified so that these uniforms could be made or repaired at board.

No longer doors in watertight bulkheads in British warships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau reporting that in all new to be built British warships no longer doors were made in the watertight bulkheads located below the waterline. The intention to make this decision was dated from quite what long time earlier.

Italian cabinet intended to strengthen the navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1898-1899 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen a.d.G.d.S. reporting that the Italian government intended to increase the naval strength with a budget of 300 million lire spread over 10-12 years.

Sunday, 7 February 2016

Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Cachelot served as guard ship at Makassar, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 30 November 1864

Model NG-MC-375, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated referred to tidings dated 15 October dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch brig Zr. Ms. Cachelot captain A.D.S. Clarkson served as guard ship in the roads of Makassar, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Cachelot, brig 1st class, call sign GQCF, on stocks at navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands by A.E. Tromp on 4 September 1844, launched Saturday 28 June 1851, transferred to the Indies Military Navy 1 January 1868, condemned and sold on a public auction at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies for ƒ 8.000 to Mr. Nicolaï on 4 February 1871, dimensions 30,50 (load line between perpendiculars) x 9,50 (inner hull) x 4,0 (fore)-4,3 (aft) x 4,71 (hold) metres, 499,5 tons displacement and an armament of 10-12 (30 pd grenade guns).

Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins Alexander der Nederlanden served as guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indiesaccording to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 30 November 1864

An item dated referred to tidings dated 15 October dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch frigate Zr. Ms. Prins Alexander der Nederlanden captain M. Cazaux van Staphorst served as guard ship in the roads of Batavia, Dutch East Indies. (1)

Note
1. Lek, frigate 2nd class, call sign GQRJ, on stocks at Amsterdam, Netherlands 1832, launched 3 September 1844, renamed Prins Alexander der Nederlanden 1844 , guard ship 1871, condemned, sold on a public auction lying at the naval establishment Onrust, Dutch East Indies  on Wednesday 21 May at 10.00 o’clock by John Price&Co; Tideman guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, 1460 tons displacement, dimensions 46,21 x 12,20 x 6,00 netres and an armament of 22 (as guard ship)-44 guns.

Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Juno served as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 30 November 1864

Model (NG-MC-345) Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam, Netherlands. Original link

An item dated referred to tidings dated 15 October dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch corvette Zr. Ms. Juno captain J.J. Westerouen van Meeteren served as guard ship in the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. (1)

Note
1. Corvette 1st class, call sign GQLJ, on stocks at the navy yard at Rotterdam, Netherlands by P. Glavimans Jz. on 20 June 1833, launched 14 May 1839, docked at the navy yard at Hellevoetsluis, Netherlands 29 March-17 April 1841, part of the Indies Military Navy since1 January 1868, guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies 18 September 1867-25 January 1870, sold at Surabaya on a public auction to the native Aridin for ƒ 16.700,00 on 2 July, dimensions 39,50 (loadline) x 10,50 (inner hull) x 4,4 (fore)-5,0 (aft) x 5,6 (hold below maindeck) metres, 929 tons displacement, 22 (1869: 14 medium 30pd guns)-32 g(24-12pd guns, 8-30pd carronades, 4-8pd guns) guns and a crew numbering 120 (1869) men.

Dutch row gunboat Zr. Ms. Nr. 14 served as guard ship as t Samarang, Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Nederlandsche Staatscourant dated 30 November 1864

An item dated referred to tidings dated 15 October dealing with the movements of the Dutch squadron in the Dutch East Indies reported that the Dutch row gunboat Zr. Ms. Nr. 14 lieutenant 2nd class C.H. Bogaert served as guard ship in the roads of Samarang, Dutch East Indies.

Dutch guard ship Zr. Ms. Curacao in 1880 according to the Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881

Wood-built. Launched in 1863. Draught 5,5 metres. Armament consisted of 15 guns. Horsepower 250nhp. Maximum speed under steam during a watch of 4 hours 8 geographic miles. Tonnage 1.083 tons. Crew numbered on 31 December 180 108 Europeans (fixed 67) and 75 natives (fixed 53). Arrived on 3 October 1875 in the Dutch East Indies, Since 11 October 1879 guard ship. Stationed on 31 December 1880 at Oleh-leh, Atjeh, Dutch East Indies. In March 1881 ordered to leave the station northern Sumatra, Dutch East Indies and to serve temporarily as guard ship at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, iron hull with wood clad on stocks at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands on 14 July 1860, launched 10 December 1863, added to the Indies Military Navy 1 October 1878, decommissioned on 1 October 1885, sold in 1886 to be broken up, displacement 2.030 tons and as dimensions 58-62,84 (over all0 x 12,25 x 5,5 metres, horsepower 250 (1880)-700 hp, speed 8,5 miles, a crew numbering 225 men and an armament consisting of 8 rifled 16cm guns.

Source
Dutch House of Representatives. Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881.5.8 Attachment F. Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies in 1880.

Dutch guard ship Zr. Ms. Gedeh in 1880 according to the Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881

Wood-built. Launched in 1874. Draught 3,8 metres. Armament consisted of 10 guns. Tonnage 1.421 tons. Crew numbered on 31 December 1880 157 Europeans (fixed 121) and 120 natives (fixed 53). Built in the Dutch East Indies and since 10 February 1875 used as guard ship. Stationed on 31 December 1880 at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. In the second quarter of 1881 temporarily decommissioned for major repairs. In March 1881 arrived the Curacao coming from Atjeh, Dutch East Indies to replace her.(1)

Note
1. Flush decked corvette, of the Indies Military Navy, call sign GQJL, on stocks at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies  1872, launched 1874, guard ship at Surabaya 1876, repaired 1881, guard ship at Surabaya 1 February 1883, transferred to Batavia, Dutch East Indies to serve there as guard ship 12 May 1884, decommissioned caused by several victims of cholera on board 14 April 1892, disinfected, docked, cleaned and painted and commissioned 28 July, in sinking condition towed in May 1899 towards Surabaya, decommissioned 1 June, condemned and broken up by own personnel, an armament of 10 guns (1885: 1-30pd guns no.11) and a crew numbering 157 men (122 Europeans and 35 natives).

Source
Dutch House of Representatives. Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881.5.8 Attachment F. Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies in 1880.

Dutch guard ship Zr. Ms. Zeeland in 1880 according to the Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881

Wood-built. Launched in 1859. Draught 6,7 metres. Armament consisted of 28 guns. Tonnage 2.067 tons. Crew numbered on 31 December 1880 283 Europeans 9fixed 123) and 118 natives (fixed 35) and since 31 July 1875 guard ship, Arrived on 18 June 1873 in the Dutch East Indies. Stationed on 31 December 1880 at Batavia. Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Screw steamship 1st class, call sign GRDC, wood-built, laid down at the navy yard at Vlissingen, Netherlands 28 February 1856, launched 31 July 1859, stricken 1874, guard ship at Batavia, Dutch East Indies 1875, decommissioned 8 December 1883, towed half January 1884 towards the roads of Surabaya, Dutch East Indies, sold on an auction for ƒ 20.600,00 to the Arab Sai Agil bin Hijdroes to be broken up in the morning of 15th March 1884, dimensions 63,5 x 15,7 x 6,7 metres, displacement 3.300 tons, horsepower 400 hp, speed 8 miles, a crew numbering 500 men and an armament of 4 (as guard ship 1-15cm, 3-12cm guns)-51 guns (consisting of 1 long 60pd gun, 30-long 30pd guns, 12-20” grenade guns and 8 rifled 16cm guns).

Source
Dutch House of Representatives. Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881.5.8 Attachment F. Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies in 1880.

Russian frigate Shtandart in imaginary battle with French frigate La Grace


The original Shtandart was laid down by the Dutch ship carpentr Wybe Gerens on 24 April 1703 at the Olonetsky shipyard ordered by the Russian czar Peter the Great. At the end of the 20th Century was a replica built, anno 2016 still in service. In recent years she was in two Dutch movies including the one dealing with the life of the Dutch 17th admiral Michiel de Ruyter. Russia-flagged, MMSI 273452840 and call sign UAEM. In 2015 she visited Vlissingen and was berthed in a small dry dock to be entered via the Dokhaven dating from begin 18th Century. Czar Peter the Great was familiar with this area when he visited this town.

Czech Republic-flagged, homeport Prague, Czech Republic and MMSI 270467000. Replica of which the building started in the end of 2008 on a Egyptian shipyard at Suez while supervised by constructor Daniel Rosecky and captain Josef Dvorsky, launched on 5 December 2010 and which was baptized on 1 May 2011 at Athens, Greece. Described as a second half century brig. Dimensions 23,8 (between perpendiculars)-32 (over all)  x ? x 2,8 x 25 (height) metres and a tonnage of 126 tons burthen. The original La Grace was the name of the frigate commanded by the Czech seaman Augustin Herman (1621-1686) who in his professional career served for the Dutch West Indies Company, afterwards as a privateer on Spanish ships and finally becoming the largest tobacco exporter of America

Combat value of French battleship Dunkerque with 50% increased according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1932 no. 4


An item referred to the magazine Naval&Military Record dated 30 March 1932 in which Gautreau wrote that originally a design for a French battle cruiser with a displacement of 23.000 ton was made. Since then was the displacement with around 3.500 ton enlarged increasing the combat value with 50%. The 30,5cm guns were to replaced to a heavier calibre of 33cm, armour was improved, the defence against torpedo boats and aircraft was improved and the speed with 2 knots increased to 28 knots.(1)

Note
1. Of the Dunkerque-class of battleships. Laid down at the navy yard at Brest, France on 24 December 1932, launched on 2 October 1935, commissioned on 1 May 1937, scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 November 1942 and finally broken up in 1958. Displacement 26.900/26.500 long tons (standard)-35.500 tons/34.900 tons (full load), a main armament of 8-33cm/13” guns and a maximum speed of 31,06 knots.

South Africa wanted her own navy according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1932 no. 4

An item referred to the R.U.S.L. Journal dated May 1932 reporting that South Africa was interested in founding her own navy. At that moment she possessed 3 minesweepers mainly used for survey duties, a task in the past executed by the Royal British Navy. If however a South African navy wanted to replace the Royal British Navy completely in the South African waters she had to grow in a far more faster tempo then now.

German pocket battleships real threat for British and French navies according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1932 no. 4

Drawing made by G.J. Frans Naerebout and published in Op de Lange Deining written by G.A.J. Bovens

An item referred to the magazine Naval&Military Record dated 23 March 1932 which compared the new Deutschland pocket battleships class (1) an their potential British and French opponents. The conclusion was that the French navy possessed none ships which successfully could stop the Deutschlands. The Duguay-Trouins (2) and Duquesne (3) ware insufficient armoured and in normal conditions was a battleship not fast enough. The last ordered 6.000-7.000 ton cruisers were although armoured and able to stop a so-called tin-class but without any chance against a Deutschland. The French projectiles weighed 123 kilo and of the Deutschland 360 kilo. The British navy with her battle cruisers HMS Hood (4), Renown (5) and Repulse (5) were with their larger calibre able to beat the Deutschland although not easy.

Notes
1. Deutschland-class heavy cruisers nicknamed pocket battle ships including the famous Admiral Graf Spee were armed with 2x3-28cm/11” guns.
2. Duguay-Trouin-class light cruisers armed with 4x2-15,5cm/6.1” guns.
3. Duquesne-class heavy cruisers armed with 4x2-20,3cm/50 Modèle 1924 guns.
4. HMS Hood battle cruisers armed in 1939 with 4x2-38,1cm/15”guns.
5. Sister ships battle cruisers Renown and Repulse, armed with 3x2-38,1cm/15”guns.

The new designed American destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1932 no. 4

An item referred to the Proceedings dated April 1932 reporting that the Bethlehem Shipbuilding Company designed new destroyers with a speed of 36,5 miles although it was expected that on the trials a higher speed was achieved/ The armament was to consist of 5-12,7cm guns which could also be used as anti aircraft guns, 2x4 torpedo guns amidships mounted and 8/10 heavy anti aircraft machineguns.

Building of French battleship Dunkerque was to start on short notice according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1932 no. 4


An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 9 April 1932 reporting that at Brest, France the building of a 26.500 ton battle cruiser was prepared. The start was however not for 1 October. There was one difficulty in advance, her length was larger then that of the 10.000 ton Washington-cruisers.

Note
1. Of the Dunkerque-class of battleships. Laid down at the navy yard at Brest, France on 24 December 1932, launched on 2 October 1935, commissioned on 1 May 1937, scuttled at Toulon, France on 27 November 1942 and finally broken up in 1958. Displacement 26.900/26.500 long tons (standard)-35.500 tons/34.900 tons (full load), a main armament of 8-33cm/13” guns and a maximum speed of 31,06 knots.

British Royal Navy ordered motor torpedo boats according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 5 March 1938 reporting that the British Royal Navy ordered 9 motor torpedo boats of the Scott Paine type by the British Power Boat Company, Hythe, England. Length 19 metres. Armament 2 torpedo tubes. Horsepower 1.500 hp and a maximum speed of 42 knots. The department of aviation ordered 7 similar boats.

Saturday, 6 February 2016

Japanese light cruiser Oh-I(1920) in 1923

Kuma type. Launched in 1920, completed in 1921, displacement 5.500 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine, all geared machinery and armament of

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Kiso (1920) in 1923

Kuma type. Launched in 1920, completed in 1921, displacement 5.500 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine, all geared machinery and armament of

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Kitakami (1920) in 1923

Kuma type. Launched in 1920, completed in 1921, displacement 5.500 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine, all geared machinery and armament of

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Tama (1920) in 1923

Kuma type. Launched in 1920, completed in 1921, displacement 5.500 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine, all geared machinery and armament of

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Kuma (1919) in 1923

Kuma type. Launched in 1919, completed in 1920, displacement 5.500 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine, all geared machinery and armament of

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Nagara (1921) in 1923

Kinu type. Launched in 1921, completed in 1921, displacement 5.570 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine all geared machinery and armament of 7-5.5” guns, 2-12pd anti aircraft guns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Natori (1921) in 1923

Kinu type. Launched in 1921, completed in 1922, displacement 5.570 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine all geared machinery and armament of 7-5.5” guns, 2-12pd anti aircraft guns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Kinu (1922) in 1923

Kinu type. Launched in 1922, completed in 1922, displacement 5.570 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine all geared machinery and armament of 7-5.5” guns, 2-12pd anti aircraft guns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Japanese light cruiser Yura (1922) in 1923

Kinu type. Launched in 1922, completed in 1922, displacement 5.570 tons, horsepower 90.000 hp, coal-oil fired turbine all geared machinery and armament of 7-5.5” guns, 2-12pd anti aircraft guns and 8 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at the Hague, Netherlands)  inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

Russian replica of 18th Century frigate Shtandart


The original ship was laid down by the Dutch ship carpentr Wybe Gerens on 24 April 1703 at the Olonetsky shipyard ordered by the Russian czar Peter the Great. At the end of the 20th Century was a replica built, anno 2016 still in service. In recent years she was in two Dutch movies including the one dealing with the life of the Dutch 17th admiral Michiel de Ruyter. Russia-flagged, MMSI 273452840 and call sign UAEM. In 2015 she visited Vlissingen and was berthed in a small dry dock to be entered via the Dokhaven dating from begin 18th Century. For photos of this visit Czar Peter the Great was familiar with this area when he visited this town and where the Admiralty Yard, later the shipyard of the Royal Netherlands Navy and since 1875 the Kon. Mij. De Schelde was situated.

Preliminary design for an American armoured cruiser submarine type 2 dated 23 October 1920


Drawing S 584-166 made after a request of the Chief of the Bureau of Construction and Repair done in early October 1920. Despite an armour weighting 474 tons was this type not built regarded as very vulnerable to torpedo attacks due to lacking sufficient side protection.

With a displacement of 13.500 (normal ready to dive) tons and as dimensions 490’0” (over all) x 60.0” (extreme on waterline) x 29’0”, Freeboard maximum at stem 16’0”m at A.P. 8’0” and a freeboard at side M.P. of 8’0”. Total depth at M.P. measured of uppermost strength D.K. 37’0”. To be fitted out with 8-1.100 shp diesels driving generators and 4 main driving motors. Speed 15,5 knots and a range of 20.000 nautical miles with a speed of 10 knots. The armament consisted of 808” guns, 2-4” anti aircraft guns and 8-21” torpedo tubes (bow 6 and stern 2). The main side belt armour stretched 5’0” below the waterline with a thickness of 90≠over 40≠. The turrets were protected by armour with as thickness sides and rear 2”, top 3” and port 6”. The coning tower was protected by 6” although the top was just 3”thick. Total thickness of protective deck 90*. Coefficients at normal displacement longitudinal .616, block .554, midship .908 and displacement-length 115. Displacement normal condition ready to drive 13.500 ton: hull ordinary 5.000 ton, deck protection 1.150 ton, protection conning tower and guns 474 ton, armament 431 ton, ammunition 275 ton, equipment 200 ton, outfit and stores 500 ton, water in auxiliary tanks and others 300 ton, fuel oil full supply 1.350 ton, margin 600 ton and lead ballast 500 ton.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

Preliminary design for an American torpedo battleship dated 31 May 1912


Drawing S 584-21 made probably made by the Bureau of Construction and Repair while in the same period was the Naval War College examining the potentials of such a ship to be built under the Fiscal Year 1913 as was recommended by the same bureau. Never realized.

Normal displacement 30.000 ton: hull complete 12.850 ton, hull fittings 1.580 ton, protection 7.534 ton, steam engineering 3.960 ton, reserve feed 2/3 supply 432 ton, battery 578 ton, ammunition&ordnance stores 390 ton, equipment&2/3 equipment stored 480 ton, outfit&2/3 stores 600 ton, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.620 ton and margin-24 ton. Dimensions 800 (water line) x 83 (outside of plating) x 28,5 (mean) feet. Block coefficient 0.555 and longitudinal coefficient .565. The main armament consisted of 18 torpedo tubes to which as secondary armament 16-6” guns were added. The turbines and21 boilers were to supply 64.700 shp and a speed of 27 miles and with a speed of 10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armour consisted of a main side belt with a extreme width of 25.5’, depth below waterline 8.5’ and thickness of 13-13.8” and aft 10-10.7”. Fire control tower, conning tower proper and tube heavy 16”, tube light 6”, none uptake protection, protective deck total 120≠. Splinter deck total thickness slopes≠ 80 and flat 60≠

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy

Tasks of new British motor torpedo boats yet not known according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 5

An item reported that the new British torpedo motor boats building costs each around 23.000 pound sterling had a length of 18 metres and an armament of 2-45cm torpedoes and some heavy machine guns. Maximum speed 40 knots. Range with an economical speed was 600 miles. What their tasks were to be was yet unknown although the magazine N.M.R. dated 16 July 1936 mentioned their strong armament suitable against low flying aircraft.

New anti aircraft guns for British cruisers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no.5

 An item referred to the Proceedings dated July 1936 reporting that several British cruisers were fitted out with the new 8-barrelled automatic anti aircraft guns able to shoot 1.000 grenades pro minute with a maximum plafond of 4 miles.

New British Tribal-class destroyers to be armed with 13cm guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 5


An item referred to the magazine R.M. dated July 1936 reporting that the new British destroyers of the Tribal-class were to be armed with semi-automatic 13cm guns. The newest automatic anti aircraft guns were able to fire 140-998 gram grenades pro minute.

Russia apparently rebuilding fleet according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 19 November 1936 reporting that Russia was rebuilding although unknown on which scale. The reporter hoped op more details while there was again a naval attaché added to the British Embassy at Moscow, Russia.

Germany fitting out Heligoland out as naval base according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I. dated November 1936 reporting that Germany refitted Heligoland as a naval base for destroyers and submarines placing 30cm naval guns and 27,1cm howitzers.

German submarines fitted out with new kind of engines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the Proceedings reporting that some of the new German submarines were fitted out with one engine also suitable for submerged propulsion using oxygen and hydrogen as fuel.

British cabinet stated to built more destroyers according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 5

 An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 30 May 936 reporting that the British cabinet made Japan and the USA clear that instead of the 150.000 as was dictated by the London Naval Treaty of 1930 she intended to had 190.000 ton of destroyers in (active) service. Of the 190.000 ton was in the meantime 83.000 ton aged. The decision was a result of the number of submarines laid down since 1930 by the major naval powers which ratified the treaty.(1)

Note
1.The first London Naval Treaty was ratified between United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and the USA with as main targets limiting naval shipbuilding and regulating submarine warfare. On 27 October 1930 were the ratifications exchanged by the major naval powers. The second treaty was ratified by the participation nations on 25 March 1936, however the major naval powers Japan and Italy don’t ratify the treaty.

Russia neglecting article of the London Naval Treaty according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine R.M. dated November 1936 reporting that the refusal of Russia to supply more details about her naval shipbuilding was a foul of article 18 of the London Naval Treaty. A British source claimed that already 2 cruisers, 6 destroyers and 15 submarines were laid down. (1)

Note
1. The first London Naval Treaty was ratified between United Kingdom, Japan, France, Italy and the USA with as main targets limiting naval shipbuilding and regulating submarine warfare. On 27 October 1930 were the ratifications exchanged by the major naval powers. The second treaty was ratified by the participation nations on 25 March 1936, however the major naval powers Japan and Italy don’t ratify the treaty.

Germany building aircraft carrier [Graf von Zeppelin] according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the magazine Le Yacht dated 14 November 1936 reporting that the German aircraft carrier at that moment being built had a maximum speed of 37 knots, an armour consisting of 16,5cm thick belt and the command bridge protected by 8cm armour, a displacement of 18.500 ton, an armament of 14-15cm anti aircraft guns and able to take 25 aircraft with her.(1)

Note
1. Laid down at the Deutsche Werke, Kiel, Germany  on 28 December 1936, launched on 8 December 1938, fell into Russian hands and destroyed on 14 August 1947 used for tests with shells and bombs, although torpedoes were needed to sunk her. Wreck found back on 12 July 2006. Displacement was 34.088 tons/33.550 long tons, speed 33,8 knots and according to a proposal dated 1939 was she to carry 42 aircraft.

Camouflage colours for British submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine R.M. dated July 1936 reporting that experiments dealing the visibility of dived submarines resulted in camouflage patrons varying in which waters they operated. For the Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean and the Red Sea were the colours to be grey green, sky blue and black. While the submarines were to operate everywhere was probably a camouflage combining the 3 patrons used.

Friday, 5 February 2016

Preliminary design for the American battleship No. 40 [New Mexico] dated 3 November 1913


Drawing S 584-38 made by the Bureau of Construction and repair for a battleship to be built under fiscal year 1915. For this design was another design (S584-041) used but now instead of 4x3-14” gun turrets to be armed with 4x2-14” guns turrets. It was a preliminary design for the New Mexico-class (1) battleships based on a modified Pennsylvania-class design.

Dimensions 590 (waterline) x 92 (outside of plating)-28’6” (mean). Block coefficient 668 and longitudinal coefficient 662 ton. With a displacement of 29.500 ton: hull complete 12.826 ton, hull fittings 1.365 ton, protection 7.504 ton, steam engineering 2.453 ton, res. feed 2/3 supply 214 ton, battery 1.279 ton, ammunition&2/3 ordnance stores 1.130 ton, equipment+2/3 equipment and outfit+2/3 stores 1.055 ton, oil fuel 2/3 supply 1.486 ton and margin 188 ton. The armament was to consist of 4x2-36cm/14”breech loading guns, 20-6” guns and 6-53cm/21” torpedo tubes. The turbines were to allow a speed of 21 knots and with a speed of10 knots a range of 8.000 nautical miles. The armour consisted of a main side belt with an exterior width of 17’-4 5/8”, depth below water line 8’6” and a thickness pf 13½”-13½”-8”. The barbettes were protected by 3”S.T.S. (light parts)-13” (heavy parts). Gun turrets were protected by 5”(roof)-9” (ear(-9/10” (sides)-18” (port). Fire control tower protected by 16”. Conning tower proper and tube heavy 16”, conning tower tube light 6”. Uptake protection 13”. Protective deck total 120≠ and splinter deck total thickness 60≠ and 80≠.

Note
1.The New Mexico (BB-40) was laid down at the New York Navy Yard on 14 October 1915, launched on 13 April 1917 and commissioned on 20 May 1918.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

Ambitious Russian naval budget for 1906 according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1905-1906 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Mitteilungen a.d.G.d.S. reported that the Russian naval budget for 1906 consisted of 116.500.000 rubles of which 39 million for new building and 4.500.000 for improving the arsenals. The total naval building program of ships, yards and harbours was 500.000.000 rubles to be divided over 3, 5 and 10 years. The major parts of the new ships were to be built in Russia although negotiations started with the American Bethlehem Company for building 10 battleships.

New British battleships to be armed with 35,6cm or 40,6cm guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated December 1937 reported that the intention to arm the five King George V-class battleships to arm with 35,6cm met quite a lot of criticism.(1) According to Hector Bywater (2) in his article in the newspaper Daily Telegraph was it impossible to use 9-40,6cm guns if the other demands of armour, speed, floating ability and so on were not neglected. Bywater thought that instead of arming the battleships with 9-35,6cm guns there were to more to be placed resulting in broadside salvo with the same shells weight as fired by 9-40,6cm guns. While one 40,6cm shell weighed 1.000 kilo were 14-36,5cm guns needed to get the similar broadside effect.

Notes
1. The King George V-class with a deep load displacement of 42.923 tons and a main armament of 2x4+1x2-10-36cm/14“ Mark VII guns.
2. Hector Charles Bywater (21 October 1884 London, England-16/17 August 1940 London, England). Journalist and military writer.

Cunard Line mail boats armed according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 5

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated July 1936 reporting that the mail boats of the Cunard Line were fitted out with 15cm gun mountings to be paid by the British Admiralty. In the contract between the Admiralty and the Cunard Line was further more agreed that the steering gears were to be protected, as much as possible was trained with the Royal British Navy in signalling and that the crews were to persuade to enter the naval reserve.

Russia launching long range submarines according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 11 October 1936 reporting that at Komsomolsk the Russian navy 20 long tonnage submarines launched. The naval base at Kronstadt was heavily protected.

German firm establish naval base on Portuguese owned Bissagos Islands according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1936 no. 8

An item referred to the Proceedings dated June 1936 which claimed that according to French sources a German firm under the alias Compania Agricol y Fabrica da Guine was busy with establishing on one of the Bissagos Islands off Portuguese Guinea a naval base for submarines and floating planes. It was suspected that the firm tried to buy the island from the Portuguese government with the intention attacking French troop and stores transports. In the meantime was the island hired for seven years by the firm from Portugal.

Note
1, Bijagós Archipelago nowadays part of Guinea-Bissau. The islands were annexed in 1936 by Portugal and added to Portuguese Guinea.

Preliminary design for an American self-propelled floating dry dock dated 25 September 1920


Drawing S 584-162 was sent to the Chief Bureau of Construction and Repair on 12 October 1920 to the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) after requested to do is. The request was done after the War College President received a letter of commodore D.C. Webb of the Civil Engineer Corps presenting the idea of a self-propelling dry dock to be used during naval campaigns outside the American waters. Webb was at that moment studying at the Naval War College. The dock was never constructed.

Dimensions 1.050’0” (over all)-115.0” (clear inside)-175.0” (over all) x 10’2½” with a normal displacement of 53.755 tons. Freeboard maximum at stem and A.P. and M.P. at side 104’9½”. Depth of centerhull 25’0” and depth between decks 10’0”. Turbo generators and electric motors were to supply 16.000 shp allowing a speed of 10 knots. To be fitted out with 4 boiler rooms. Length of compartments boiler room amidships 105’.0” and aft 52’6”en motor room 52’6”. Normal displacement of 53.755 ton: hull allow 42 tons each feet-44.100 ton, hull fittings 1.675 ton, steam engineering at 16.900 shp=300 ton, reserve feed 260 ton, equipment & outfit and 2/3 stores1.950 ton, fuel oil 2/3 full supply 2.600 ton and margin 1.870 ton.

Source the so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings is presented to the General Board which adviced the Secretary of the Navy.

Dutch pinnace Pelikaan 1641-1642

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, hired merchant ship between 1641-1642, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 136-136¼ x 29½ x 14, height above hold 6½-6’7” (by mast) feet, an armament of 30-32 guns and a crew numbering 94-100 men.

Dutch warship Pelikaan 1603-1606

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, mentioned between 1603-1606, a crew numbering 70 men and a tonnage of 100 last. Minute States General dated 22 April 1606 destined for expedition to Portugal/Spain, 100 last, commanded by Jan Michielsz Block. Minute States General dated 6 November 1603: destined for winter season for serving off Flemish coast, commandeur Broer Jansz.

Dutch warship Pelikaan 1585

Of the admiralty Zealand, seized in 1584, fate unknown, tonnage of 600 barrels.

Dutch transport Pauw 1688

Of the admiralty of Amsterdam, smak, hired for 450 at Amsterdam, Netherlands as part of the fleet which brought king-stadholder Willem III to England in 1688, master Jasper Dirkss, appraised value of ship ƒ 2.475.

Dutch 8th charter/10th charter Pauw 1666-1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built by Jan van Rheenen at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1666 or 1676, last mentioned in 1688, one deck, dimensions(Amsterdam foot) 86 x 22 x 9¾, and an armament of18 guns. Commanding officers 1688 Wijbrand Baarends, in 1691 commandeur Gillis Jansz du Pon, captured by French fleet commanded by Jan Bart at Doggersbank. Mix of two ships? In 1688 was a fire ship mentioned.

Dutch inland yacht Patrijsvogel 1724-1818

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1724, last mentioned in 1818, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 50 x 9 x 5 feet.

Dutch galliot Patientia 1665

Of the admiralty Zealand, hired in 1665, a crew numbering 8 men, tonnage of 60 last and an armament of 2 guns. Admiralty minute dated 10 July 1665: to be fitted out with 2 guns of the smallest calibre, commanded by Claes Walle.

Dutch transport Parel 1658

Fluyt ship used as transport, mentioned in 1658, an armament of 19-24 guns and a crew numbering 30 men.

Dutch 5th charter Pallas 1780-1799

Of the admiralty Friesland, on stocks at Harlingen, Netherlands in 1780, launched in 1781, nearly completed in October 1781, rerazeed 1794-1795, converted into a keel lighter in 1797, captured by British in 1799, one gun deck, dimensions 154 x 44 x 17 feet, an armament of 20 (after 1795)-36-44 guns and a crew numbering 270 men.

Thursday, 4 February 2016

Italian armoured cruiser San Marco 1905-1949


Of the San Giorgio-class wit as sister ship the San Giorgio. Improved Pisa-class design. Building ordered on 18 September 1905, laid down at the Regio Cantieri do Castellammare di Stabia, Castellammare di Stabia, Italy on 2 January 1907, launched on 20 December 1908, reclassified as a radio controlled target ship in 1931 and converted between 1931-1935, captured by German forces at La Spezia on 9 September 1943, found back at the end of the war while sunk in 1945, stricken on 27 February 1947 and finally broken up in 1949.

She differs in many ways from her sister ship while in her none wood was used, the first with a gyroscopic compass and she was the first ever turbine powered ship with 4 screws ever. Displacement 10.969 tons/10.796 long tons (normal load)-11.900 tons/11.700 long tons (deep load) and as dimensions 131,04 (between perpendiculars)-140,89 (over all) x 21,03 x 7,76 metres or 429.11-462.3 x 60.0 x 25.6 feet. Fitted out with four steam turbines and 18 Babcock&Willcox boilers supplying via 4 screws 23.000 shp (design)-23.030 ihp (trials) allowing a speed of 23 (design)-23,75 (trials) knots. Armament consisted of 4x2-25,4cm/10” Canone da 254/45 A Modello 1908 guns, 4x2-19cm/7.5” Canone da 190/45 A Modello 1908 guns, 18x1-7,6cm/3.0 L/40 quick firing guns to be used against torpedo boats , 2x1-4,7cm/1.9” L/50 quick firing guns and 3-45cm/17.7” submerged torpedo tunes. In the First World War were 8-7,6cm guns replaced by 6-7,6cm anti aircraft guns and was one torpedo tube removed. The armour consisted of a 8cm/3.1” (at bow&stern)-20cm/7.9” (amidships) thick belt, a 5cm/2.0” thick deck with the conning tower, main gun turrets and secondary gun turrets were protected by respectively 25,4cm/10.0“, 20cm and 160cm/6.3” thick armour. Crew numbered 698-705 men.

Italian armoured cruiser San Giorgio 1904-1952


Of the San Giorgio-class wit as sister ship the San Marco. Improved Pisa-class design.
Building ordered on 3 August 1904, laid down at the Regio Cantieri do Castellammare di Stabia, Castellammare di Stabia, Italy on 4 July 1905, launched on 27 July 1908, completed on 1 July 1910, training ship 1930-1935, modernized 1937-1938, scuttled at Tobruk, Libya to prevent capture by the Allies forces on 22 January 22 January 1941, stricken from the navy list on 18 October 1946 and sunk while under tow towards Italy to be broken up in 1952.

Displacement 10.167 tons/10.006 long tons and as dimensions 131,04 (between perpendiculars)-140,89 (over all) x 21,03 x 7,35 metres or 429.11-362.3 x 69.0 x 24.1 feet. Fitted out with 2 vertical triple expansion steam engines to which 14 mixed-firing Blechynden boilers were added supplying via one screw 19.595 ihp (trials)-23.2000 shp (design) allowing a speed off 22,5 (design)-23,2 (trials) knots. With a speed pf 10 knots was her range 6.270 nautical miles. Armament consisted of 4x2-25,4cm/10” Canone da 254/45 A Modello 1908 guns, 4x2-19cm/7.5” Canone da 190/45 A Modello 1908 guns, 18x1-7,6cm/3.0 L/40 quick firing guns to be used against torpedo boats , 2x1-4,7cm/1.9” L/50 quick firing guns and 3-45cm/17.7” submerged torpedo tunes. In the First World War were 8-7,6cm guns replaced by 6-7,6cm anti aircraft guns and was one torpedo tube removed. The armour consisted of a 8cm/3.1” (at bow&stern)-20cm/7.9” (amidships) thick belt, a 5cm/2.0” thick deck with the conning tower, main gun turrets and secondary gun turrets were protected by respectively 25,4cm/10.0“, 20cm and 160cm/6.3” thick armour. Crew numbered 698-705 men.

German light cruiser SMS Graudenz (1912-1920) and Italian cruiser Ancona 1920-1937


Of the Graudenz-class with as sister ship the Regensburg. Laid down at the Kaiserliche Werft, Kiel, Germany in 1912, launched on 25 October 1913, commissioned on 10 August 1914, stricken from the navy list on 10 March 1920, handed over to the Allies as war retribution transferred to Italy at Cherbourg, France under the name ‘E” on 1 June 1920, renamed Ancona and commissioned in Italian service on 6 May 1925, refitted to be able to take a Macchi M7 seaplane with her in 1925, partly rebuilt with lengthening bow and forecastle necessary to fit her out with a catapult to launch the plane, laid up in 1932 at Taranto, Italy, stricken on 11 March 1937 and finally broken up.

Displacement 4.912 tons/4.834 long tons/5.415 short tons (design)-6.382 tons/6.281 long tons/7.035 short tons (full combat load) with as dimensions 142,7 x 13,8 x 5,75 metres or 468.2 x 45.3 x 18.10”.
Fitted out with two sets of Marine steam turbines to which 10 coal-fired marine-type water0tube boilers and 2 oil-fired double-ended boilers were added supplying via two screws 26.000 ship allowing a speed of 27,5 knots and with a speed of 12 knots a range of 5.500 nautical miles. The crew numbered in German service 385 men. The armour consisted of a 6cm/2.4” thick belt and a 6cm/2.4” thick deck. The original armament consisted of 12x1-10,5cm L/45 quick firing guns and 2-50cm torpedo tubes mounted on deck; she was also able to take 120 mines with her. Later were the guns replaced by 7-15cm L/45 quick firing gins and 2-8,8cm L/45 anti aircraft guns.

Dutch 1st charter Amsterdam 1712-1738

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built by Jan van Rheenen at naval yard at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1712, nominated on 28 February 1714, 1733 indicated as useless sold for 10.500 to a Spanish ship owner on 31 January 1738, used on West Indies, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 176 (prow)-180 x 49½ x 17½-18½, draught 10¼-15, an armament of 96 guns and a crew numbering 660 men.

Dutch 3rd charter Amsterdam 1763-1795

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, on stocks at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1763, launched in 1764, suitable to serve as guard ship and further repairs not worth in 1786, sold for ƒ 3.750 to be broken up in 1795, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 167½-170 (lower deck) x 45 8/11 x 20½, an armament of 60-68 guns and a crew numbering 450 men. Commanding officers 1777-1780 rear admiral P.H. Reynst, 1780 Graaf van Byland and 1782-1784 captain A. Braak or vice admiral L. Graaf van Bylandt. In 1782 flagshipo of Graaf van Bylandt so probably Braak was her captain.

Dutch warship Anna 1665

Fitted out by the admiralty Amsterdam, property of the E.I.C. chamber Amsterdam, yacht, mentioned 1665, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 108 x 26½ x 11¾, height above 6, an armament of 28-44 guns (6-8pd, 12-6pd, 6-4pd, 4-3pd, 2 swivels) and a crew numbering 80 men. Commanded by captain Dirck Wessels.

Dutch transport De Anna 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, hired at Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England in October 1688, dimensions 82 x 21 x 11½ feet. Master Harme Janse Volck, appraised value of ship ƒ 4.600.

Dutch fluyt Anna 1693

Of the admirality Zealand, mentioned in 1693.

Dutch transport Anna 1688

Of the admiralty Maze, hired for ƒ 1.000 at Rotterdam, Netherlands to bring king-stadholder William III to England in October 1688, dimensions 85 x 22½ x 11, height overloop 4½ feet. Master Thomas Andriesz, appraised value of ship ƒ 7.000.

Wednesday, 3 February 2016

Russian Project 1141 Sokol anti submarine hydrofoil craft Aleksandr Kunahovich 1974-1994


Laid down at Zelenodolsk with yard number 801 on 29 July 1974, launched on 26 October 1975, commissioned on 31 December 1977 and decommissioned on 10 March 1994. With a displacement of 349 (standard)-465 (full load) tons were the dimensions 50,18 x 9,76-20 (with wings) x 2,165-6,9 (with wings) metres. Maximum speed 52 and a range varying between 850 nautical miles with 50 knots and 2.000 nautical miles with 8 knots and supplied for 1 week. The machinery consisted of gas turbines and diesels. The original armament consisted of 2x6 barrelled 3cm AK-630M guns and 2x4-TR-223 40cm torpedo tubes. In 1990 were the torpedo tubes replaced by 2x4 Medvedka anti submarine missile complex launchers (8 K77R anti-submarine guided missiles). Her crew numbered 34 men. She served in the Black Sea Fleet with hull numbers 292, 077, 068, 059 and 061. Decommissioned on 10 March 1994.Project 11414 was a modernized version. Preceded by the Project 1240 Sarancha-class and succeeded by the 1145.1 Mukha-class.

Dutch yacht Windhond 1628-1631

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, mentioned in 1628, mentioned as wrecked in 1631, 16 guns (8-8pdr (gotelingen), 8 swivels), a crew numbering 35 men and a tonnage of 40 last. Commanded in 1628 by captain Thijs Hermansz van Campen, convoy duties off (Trend of) France.

Dutch warship Windhond 1694-1696

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1694, last mentioned in 1696, an armament of 22 guns and a crew numbering 90 men. In 1696 convoy duties, captain Westerhout.

Dutch dremmelaar Zwaan 1703

Of the admiralty Maze, mentioned in 1703, an armament of 10 guns and a crew numbering 50 men.

Dutch 9th charter Windhond 1701-1750

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, built at Amsterdam, Netherlands in 1701, sold in 1750, one deck, dimensions (Amsterdam foot) 96 x 25 x 10½ and an armament of 18-24 guns.
One source mentioned a 9th charter Windhond, with an armament of 24 guns, built in 1701, dimensions 90 x 26 x 11½, a fire ship Windhond, with an armament of 8 guns, built in 1702, sold in 1750 for ƒ 4.000, built 1701, dimensions 90 x 26 x 11½ and a Windhond, with an armament of 30 guns, built 1710 by Jan van Rheenen, lost in 1711 with as dimensions 112 x 32 x 14½ feet.

Dutch advice yacht Windhond or Hazewind 1665

Of the advice yacht, admiralty Maze, mentioned in 1665, dimensions 53'5" x 11 x ? feet, an armament of 3-2pd guns and a crew numbering 12 men. Commanded on 16 March 1665 by captain Cornelis Pieterss.

Dutch warship Windhond 1658

Of the admiralty Zealand, mentioned as part of the fleet sent to Denmark in 1658, with a crew numbering 23 men.

Dutch warship Windhond 1597

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, mentioned in 1597, with a crew numbering 70 men and a tonnage of 150 last. Served as cruiser in Narrow Seas.

Dutch 2nd charter Prins Maurits 1782-1797

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, on stocks at Amsterdam, Netherlands on 17 July 1782, launched on 12 September 1783, renamed Dappere in 1795, captured by British in 1797, dimensions 179 x 48 9/11 x 22 feet and an armament of 74 guns.

Dutch transport Prins Hendrik 1688

Of the admiralty Amsterdam, hired for ƒ 1.500 at Amsterdam, Netherlands as part of the fleet which brought king-stadholder Willem III to England in 1688, master Claas Jacobss, appraised value of ship ƒ 6.950.

Dutch warship Prins Hendrik 1638

Of the admiralty Noorderkwartier, built in 1638, with an armament of 26 guns, a crew numbering 95 men and a tonnage of 160 last.

Dutch warship Prins Hendrik 1628-1638

Of the admiralty Maze, mentioned between 1628-1638, an armament of 24 guns, a crew numbering 110 men and a tonnage of 170-200 last. Possible more as one vessel with the same name.

Dutch guard vessel Prins Casemier 1746-1747

Of the admiralty Maze, a so-called uitlegger, mentioned between 1746-1747.

Tuesday, 2 February 2016

Casco super yacht Amels 24202 2015-

Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 January 2016

Casco Limited Edition 242 built by the Damen shipyard at Gdynia, Poland for Amels Holland. Estimated 82.5000.000 euros. Gross tonnage 1.787 tons and as dimensions 74 x 12,46 x 3,85 metres or 242 x 41 x 12.6 feet. Exterior design Tim Heywood. Crew numbers 18 persons and accommodation for 12 guests. Maximum speed 16,5 knots and with a speed of 12,5 knots a range of 5.000 nautical miles.

Tug (ex-Wielingen 1969-1997, ex-Leopardo 1997-2004) Leopard 2004-


Inner harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 20 January 2016

Vanatua-flagged, homeport Port Vila, IMO 6819697, MMSI 576909000 and call sign YJRA7.Gross tonnage 274 tons, summer deadweight 155 tons and as dimensions 32,62 (overall) x 9,2 (extreme) x 3,69 metres. Built by Béliard-Murdoch, Oostende for account of the SA de Remoquage à Hélice, Antwerp, Belgium in 1969. She was stationed at Zeebrugge, Belgium. Sold in 1996 towards Portugal and renamed Leopardo. Ex-Wielingen renamed 1997 and Leopardo renamed October 2004.

General cargo ship (ex-Industrial Force 2011-?) Ran J [2016]-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 January 2016

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, IMO 9506746, MMSI 305740000 and call sign V2FO5.
Built by Sainty Jiangdu Shipbuilding, Jiangdu, China in 2011. Ex-Industrial Force of Junherhans Reederei, Haren Ems, Germany. January 2016 of Arkon Projects.

German chemical tanker Frank 2000-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 19 January 2016

Gibraltar-flagged, IMO 9204049, MMSI 236107000 and call sign ZDEF5. Built by Union Naval Valencia, Valencia, Spain in 2000. Owned and managed by Carl F Peters, Hamburg, Germany.

US cabinet still not asked for a budget to built 3 40.000 ton battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1916/1917 no. 9

An item referred to the Naval and Military Record reported that it was still not decided to add to the budget for that year [1917]- the new building of 3 battleships with a displacement over 40.000 tons, a speed of 23 miles and an main armament of 4x3-40,6cm guns. It was even possible that instead of the 40,6 cm guns heavier guns were used while 45,7 and 50,9 cm guns seemed to be tested.

Russian Amur river flotilla strengthened according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine R.M. dated November 1937 reporting that the Russian Amur river flotilla consisted of 5-950 ton monitors built in 1911, some old 190 ton gunboats and numerous motor boats. Japanese tidings reported that recently some river gunboats of a new type were added to the flotilla.

Brazil building destroyers of American design according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 1 November 1937 reporting that the Brazilian navy was building 3-1.500 ton destroyers of the American Mahan-class to be named Greenhalgh (1), Marcilio Dias (2) and Mariz e Baros.(3) at the navy yard on the small island Cobras off Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The needed turbines and auxiliary machinery and major part of building materials were bought in the USA.

Notes
1. Launched on 6 July 1941, commissioned in November 1943 and decommissioned in 1965.
2. Launched on 20 July 1940, commissioned in November 1943 and decommissioned in 1966.
3. Launched on 28 December 1940, commissioned in November 1943 and decommissioned in 1972.

New British battleships to be armed with 35,6cm guns according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 3

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated January 1938 reporting that the press claimed that the 35.000 ton battleships now being built in the United Kingdom were to be armed with 10 or 4x3-2-35,6cm guns, 6x2-15,2cm guns, 12/16 heavy anti aircraft guns and numerous machineguns. The turrets and bridge were protected against gas attacks. The armour deck was thicker than that of the Nelson (15,9cm). Dimensions 225,6 x 31,4 x 8,5cm guns. Speed at least 30 knots. Horsepower 166.000 hp. Two catapults and bale to take 4 planes with them.(1)

Note
1. The King George V-class with a deep load displacement of 42.923 tons and a main armament of 2x4+1x2-10-36cm/14“ Mark VII guns?

British Admiralty ordered motor torpedo boats while using destroyers for escort tasks according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 15 September 1938 reporting that the British Admiralty signed contracts for the delivery of total 10-18 ton motor torpedo boats armed with 2 torpedo tubes and some small anti aircraft armament. Maximum speed was approximately 50 knots. It was believed that when a sufficient number was delivered these boats were to be used for torpedo attacks. The destroyers were than more available for escorting battleships.

Increasing importance of naval station in New Zealand according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine U.S.A. dated 29 September 1938 reporting that at the navy repair yard at Devonport, Auckland, New Zealand a navy captain was appointed as captain super intendant. This new function proved according to the magazine that the naval stations at New Zealand became of more importance.

England founding base for flying boats in Penang, Malysia according to the Dutch magazine Marinenlad dated 1938 no. 3

An item referred to the Proceedings dated February 1938 reporting that England was founding a base for the flying boats of the Imperial Airways in the Glugor Bay, Penang, Malaysia. Building costs 100.000 Dutch guilders.

USA stationing cruiser squadron along Atlantic coastline according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 22 September 1938 reporting that the US cabinet decided to station a squadron of 7new 10.000 cruisers along the Atlantic coast.

Balance between numbers of British destroyers and submarines owned by other major naval powers completely disturbed according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1938 no. 7

An item referred to the Proceedings dated October 1938 reporting when the First World War broke out The Royal British Navy more destroyers (230) possessed than the total number of submarines (191) in the whole world. Nowadays possessed England 149 destroyers and flotilla leaders (of which just 75 described as modern) and another 40 being built. The number of submarines in the world however was almost exploded. The USA, Russia, France, Italy and Germany possessed together 585 submarines!

Russian sailors longer in active service according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred to the magazine U.S.R. dated 2 June 1939 reporting that instead 4 years the personnel of the Russian fleet was to service 5 years.

Greece founding new navy shipyard at Salamis according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated July 1939 reporting that at Scaramanga/Salamis, Greece a new navy shipyard was to be founded. The intention was to lay down the keels of 2 destroyers in the end of 1939.

Belgium building armed fishery patrol annex royal yacht Artevelde according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1939 no. 10

An item referred to the magazine Schiffbau dated 1 August 1939 reporting that at Antwerp, Belgium the fishery patrol Artevelde was laid down, also suitable to be used as royal yacht. With a displacement of 1.600 tons were the dimensions 98,25 x 10,5 x 3,60 x 5,85 metres. Horsepower 30.000 hp and a speed of 30 knots. The armament consisted of 2x2 anti aircraft guns.

Monday, 1 February 2016

Dutch screw steamship 4th class Samarang in 1880 according to the Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881


Iron-frame with wood planked. Launched in 1876. Armed with 3 guns. Draught 3,5 metres. Horsepower 90nhp. Tonnage 323 tons. Maximum speed during a watch of 4 hours 6-7 geographic miles while under steam. Arrived on 6 June 1877 in the Dutch East Indies. Her crew numbered on 31 December 1879 64 (fixed 74) Europeans and 25 (fixed 24) natives. Temporarily stricken in September 1879 to be repaired on 15 July 1880 decommissioned, sent on 27 August to the station Mendado and Moluccas, stranded on 17 September on the reef of Nin Besar near Mendao, refloated on 17 October but sent towards Surabaya with severe damage. On 1 February 1881 temporarily decommissioned.(1)

Note
1. Call sign GQTK, on stocks at the shipyard of the Nederlandsche Stoomboot Maatschappij, Fijenoord, Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1875, launched in 1876, commissioned on 16 October 1876, decommissioned on 1 November 1893, condemned and sold at the navy establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies on 10:00 o’clock on Saturday 21 April 1894 but Saturday 29 September 1894 again offered for sale. Dimensions 45,00 (between perpendiculars)-53,60 (over all) x 9,00 x 3,60 metres, displacement of 853 tons, horsepower 90 nhp.460 ehp. Speed 10 miles, a crew numbering 76 Europeans and 28 natives and an armament consisting of 1-18cm rifled gun and 2-12 cm KA. guns to which later 1-7,5cm A gun and 2-12cm K.A. were added. Wood planked iron built frame and zinced.

Source
Dutch House of Representatives. Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881.5.8 Attachment F. Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies in 1880.

Screw steamship 4th class Makasser in 1880 according to the Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881

Model NG-MC-1281 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands. Original link

Begin 1880 at Onrust, Dutch East Indies to be docked and refitted. Made between 20 January-9 April 1880 a voyage towards Siam and Saigon, docked again at Onrust until 27 April and made then a voyage between 15 May and 3 October Northern Borneo, Solok Archipelago, Northern Celebes and the Moluccas. On 3 October arrived she at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies to be docked and repaired. In the first quarter of 1881 went she towards the Timor Archipelago and returned from there against 1 May.

Iron built with wood planked, launched in 1876, draught 3,5 metres, armament of 3 guns, maximum speed during a watch of 4 hours 6-7 geographic miles and a tonnage of 323 tons. Horsepower 90 nhp.(1)

Note
1. Macassar or Makassar, screw steamship 4th class, call sign GQNB, on stocks at the Koninklijke Fabriek van stoom- en andere werktuigen, Amsterdam, Netherlands as the Suriname on 21 January 1876, launched on 17 December 1876, needed for service in the Dutch East Indies renamed Makassar (later renamed Makassar), departure from the shipyard on 25 June 1877, commissioned on 16 July 1877, decommissioned on 1 September 1903, converted into a survey vessel on 1899, decommissioned on 27 November 1903, condemned in 1905, converted into an ammunition ship, stricken inn 1919, still existing although not used at the naval establishment at Surabaya, Dutch East Indies in 1939. Iron-built and zinced. Displacement 850 tons and as dimensions 45.00 (between perpendiculars) x 9,00 x 3,60 metres. One 90 nhp/400 ihp steam engine allowing via one screw a speed under steam of 8,6 knots. The armament consisted of 1 rifled 18cm, 2-12cm K.A. guns and 3,7cm guns. In 1893 was the 18cm guns replaced by a 16cm guns. Her crew numbered 100 men (76 Europeans, 24 natives).

Model NG-MC-1281 Rijksmuseum Amsterdam Netherlands
Original url http://hdl.handle.net/10934/RM0001.COLLECT.245186

Source
Dutch House of Representatives. Colonial Account [Dutch East Indies] over 1881.5.8 Attachment F. Royal Netherlands Navy in the Dutch East Indies in 1880.