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Sunday, 25 February 2018

New Japanese airforce base founded at Ominato according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the Revista Marittime dated October 1934 reporting that Japan founded of the most important new airforce bases at Ominato where floatplanes and fighters were stationed. Main task of the base was the protection of the Tsugaru Strait [between Honshu and Hokkaido] . There was also a repair workshop with 200 labourers available. 

British aircraft carriers HMS Eagle, Furious and Hermes changing stations according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

HMS Eagle

HMS Hermes

HMS Furious

n item referred to the magazine R.U.S.I. dated November 1934 reporting that the British aircraft carrier HMS Eagle (1) was to be replaced in the Far East by the HMS Hermes (2) and would replace on her turn the HMS Furious (3) in the Mediterranean.

Notes
1. Originally designed as the Almirante Cochrane of the Chilean Almirante Latorre-class of super dreadnoughts. Her building was ordered on 29 July 1912, laid down by Armstrong Whitworth &Company Limited, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England with yard number on 20 February 1913, building suspended caused by the outbreak of the First World War in 1914, redesigning started already for the purchase resulting in a preliminary design dated 8 February 1918 but which was considerable changed, purchased by the Royal British Navy on 28 February 1918, launched on 8 June 1918, converted into an aircraft carrier, transported to High Walker yard to be fitted out on 18 June 1918, conversion suspended when Chile wanted to buy her back after recon version in a battleship on 21 October 1919, this was however regarded the costs refused, commissioned on 20 February 1924, refitted at Portsmouth, England between August 1931-28 November 1932, refitted at Devonport, England in 1936-1937 and sunk by the German submarine U-73 70 nautical miles way from Cape Salinas, Majorca on 11 August 1942. Pennant number 94.
2. Building ordered in April 1917, laid down by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick, Newcastle on Tyne, England on 15 January 1918, launched on 11 September 1919, commissioned on 18 February 1924, training ship since 16 July 1938, again aircraft carrier since 24 August 1939 and sunk by Japanese aircraft off Batticaloa, Ceylon underway to the Maledives on 9 April 1942.
3. Originally a very lightly armoured and armed battle cruiser of a modified Courageous-design especially built to support the so-called Baltic Project of admiral Lord Fisher which was an invasion on the German coast of Pomerania, She was to support the landing. Laid down at the shipyard of Armstrong Whitworth, Wallsend, England on 8 June 1915, launched on 15 August 1916, commissioned on 26 June 1917, trials on 2 August 1917, first landing of an aircraft on a moving ship on 2 August 1917, returned to the dockyard for removal of her aft turret and instead fitting her out with a landing deck and 2 lifts for the hangars, decommissioned on 15 March 1918, laid up, converted into an aircraft carrier fitted out with a continuous flight deck of 175,6 x 28 metres between June 1921-September 1925, between 1 July 1930 and February 1932 again modernized, decommissioned in May 1932, deck landing training carrier since 1937, reserve since 15 September 1944, paid off and berthed at Loch Striven in April 1945 and finally sold to be broken up in 1948, which was completed at Troon, Scotland in 1954. Pennant number 47. Nicknamed Spurious. 

Turkey and Siam wanted to let built warships by Japanese shipyards according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the Jap. Chr. dated 8 November 1934 reporting that Turkey asked Japan for a tender for delivering 6 submarines and 2 submarine mother ships. It was however doubtful if Japan could accept such an order while all shipyards had more as enough work.(1) Recently asked Siam tenders for a tanker and a minelayer. The Japanese press mentioned an increasing number of requests of foreign powers for building merchant and warships which was a clear prove of the quality of Japanese shipbuilding.

Note
1. The German shipyard Germaniawerft, Kiel, Germany received orders for building the four submarines of the Ay-class Saldiray, Atilay and Batiray with the Yildiray built by the Gölcuk Naval Shipyard using a modified Type IX submarine design. The British shipyard Vickers-Armstrong built 5 submarines which all were taken over by the British Royal navy in 1940. 

Japan founding several new airforce bases according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad 1934 no. 7

An item referred to the R.U.S.I. dated November 1934 reporting that Japan was founding airforce bases at Tomobe, Kisarazu near Tokyo, Ochischi in the north, Kagoshima and Chinkai in Korea. 

British submarine HMS Thames slightly damaged during manoeuvres according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 2

Revenge-class

An item reported to the magazine N.M.R. dated 17 January 1935 reporting that the British 1.800 tons submarine Thames (1) was lightly damaged when she during manoeuvres near Malta dived under the Royal Sovereign.(2)

Notes
1. Ocean-going River-class submarine, launched by Vickers Armstrong, Barrow, England on 26 February 1932, completed on 14 September 1932 and did nor return from a mission and probably sunk after hitting a mine of Norway end July-begin August 1940.
2.  Part of the Revenge or Royal Sovereign-class battleships. 

British aircraft carrier HMS Hermes modernized according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 2


An item referred to the magazine Revista Marittime dated January 1935 reporting the British aircraft carrier Hermes was modernized, costs 217.700 pound sterling. Still she could carry just 15-20 aircraft with her.(1)

Note
1. Building ordered in April 1917, laid down by Armstrong Whitworth, Elswick, Newcastle on Tyne, England on 15 January 1918, launched on 11 September 1919, commissioned on 18 February 1924, training ship since 16 July 1938, again aircraft carrier since 24 August 1939 and sunk by Japanese aircraft off Batticaloa, Ceylon underway to the Maledives on 9 April 1942. 

Dutch tall ship Avatar (1941) 2010-



Rostock, Germany 13 August 2016

Originally built for the German Kriegsmarine in 1941 at Wolgast, Germany as a cutter with yard number 401. Composite-hull consisting of iron thrushes with a wooden hull. Appearance of a fishing cutter to mislead the enemy. In 1957 at Spaarndam, Netherlands was the wood replaced by steel and commissioned as a fishing vessel, at the end as the IJmuiden 64 or Grietje Maria on the North Sea until she was stricken during the of the fisheries rehabilitation. Then used for sport fishery until she was sold in 1998 to be converted into a charter ship. This project was however not completed and in 2010 again sold to André Hanzens. She was now converted into a top sail schooner which was in March 2014 commissioned. Dimensions nowadays 34,5 x 6,4 x 2,8 metres and a sail area of 310-450 square metres.

French privateer la Hasardeuse of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Pierre Blare. Measurement 18 (?) tons, armament of 6 guns and a crew numbering 49 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la S. Marie of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer François van Reischote. Measurement 50 tons, armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering 50 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Petite Sirène of Dunkirk 1707 and 1709

Commanding officer François van Reischote. Measurement 120 tons, armament of 18 guns and a crew numbering 140 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Marquis de Bernières of Dunkirk 1706 and 1710

Commanding officer François van Reischote.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le S. Eloi of Dunkirk 1703-1705

Commanding officer François van Reischote. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 3 guns and 6 swivels and a crew numbering 64 men and 8 boys.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

German sailing schooner (ex-Skarvholmen 1951-1978) Jachara 1978-

Rostock, Germany 13 August 2016

Germany-flagged, homeport Eckernföde. Origin Lofoten-cutter. Built by Bardset, Nordmøre, Norway in 1951. Ex-Skarvholmen used for transporting fish and cargo around the Lofoten until 1976. Sold in 1978 to the Norddeutsche Gesellschaft für Diakonie, Rendsburg at that moment being in worse condition. Rebuilt by Kröger Shipyard, Rensburg into a fore-and-aft-schooner for youth work. Renamed Jachara. 

Dutch chiampan Middelburg around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. In quite well condition.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Rotterdam around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Old and for the major part worn out.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Haarlem around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Old and for the major part worn out.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Alkmaar around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Old and for the major part worn out.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Enkhuijsen around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Old and for the major part worn out.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Saturday, 24 February 2018

Dutch anchor handling vessel Smit Kamara 2005-



Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

In the past Dominica-flagged, homeport Portsmouth. IMO 9322607, MMSI 325448000 and call sign J7BP9. Displacement 1.700 tons, gross tonnage 2.588 tons and as dimensions 72 x 16 x 4,6-5,4 metres. Built in 2005 at the shipyard of Keppel Singmarine, Singapore. Owned and managed by Union De Remorquage Et De Sauvetage, Antwerp, Belgium. Nowadays Belgium-flagged, homeport Antwerp, Belgium. Part of the Boskalis-fleet. 

The Polish border guard at Leba, Poland according to a CIA report dated 30 October 1951

An item reported that the Polish WOP unit (borderguard) possessed two patrol boats which were former American landing craft narked R-1 and probably to handed over to the Polish navy in the near future. Sometimes visited Polish small naval vessels the harbour with the village occasionally used for training marines coming from Gdynia and Ustka. Stanislaw Harynek was captain of the port while Czeslaw Gozdzik was chief inspector of fishing.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R009100390007-6

France building Richelieu-class battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 4

French fast battleship Dunkerque

French Richelieu-class battleships

Roma of the Italia Vittorio Veneto-class

An item referred to the N.M.R. dated 11 April 1935 reporting that the [first] French 35.000 ton battleship (1) was to be laid down in August of September. The building costs were estimated to be 785 million francs or 10 times the price as the new to be built 1.700 ton destroyers. The second battleship was to be laid down on 1 January 1937 at St. Nazaire, France.

Notes
1. The Richelieu-class of which the Richelieu and Jean Bart were completed but the Clemenceau and Gascogne not and the with a design standard displacement of 35.000 ton, preceded by the Dunkerque-class and to succeeded by the never built Alsace-class. Designed as an answer on the Italian Vittorio Veneto-class battleships (1) while Italy and not Germany was the main threat for France regarded the supremacy in the Mediterranean. As a result of building under different programs were the ship not entirely similar. Richelieu was laid down at the Brest Navy Yard, France on 22 October 1935, launched in the Salou no. 4 graving dock on 17 January 1939, bow and stern parts were with the hull assembled in the Laninon dock no. 9, trials in April 1940, commissioned in June 1940, part of the forces of Vichy France, attacked by British Royal Air Force while lying at Dakar, Senegal - afraid she would fell in German hands, on 8 July 1940, involved in the Battle of Dakar against Free French and British forces between 23-25 September 1940, departed for the USA on 30 January 1943, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard overhauled and repaired, commissioned in October 1943, accommodation ship at Brest since 21 May 1956, laid up in reserve in 1958, condemned in 16 January 1968, renamed Q432 and breaking up at Cantieru Navali Santa Maria, Genoa, Italy started in September 1968.
2. Jean Bart was laid down in the Caquot or Jean Bart dock at Chantiers de Penhoët, Saint-Nazaire, France in December 1936, launched on 6 March 1940, captured by the German forces when they invaded and occupied France in June 1940, escaped while being 75% to Casablanca, French Morocco, sunk while lying there during an allied air attack on 8 November 1942, refloated was on 21 September 1945 suggested to complete her a 40.000 tons aircraft carrier with 40-54 planes, completed as battleship, commissioned in active service on 1 May 1955, reserve since 1 August 1957, never realized plans to convert her into a guided missile battleship in 1957-1958, decommissioned in 1961, Gunnery School Tender at Toulon, France since 1961, stricken in 1968 and broken up at Brégailon, Toulon, France since on 24 June 1970.

Turkey not allowed to reinforce the defence of the Dardanelles according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 4

Roma of the Italian Vittorio Veneto-class battleships

An item referred to the N.M. dated 30 May 1935 reporting that Turkey could no reinforce the Dardanelles defence without violating the Treaty of Lausanne.(1) Although the Soviet Union would not protest it was not believed that Turkey would accept the consequence of doing so. On the other hand the Dutch magazine stated that much was not known of what was going on in Turkey. The home waters were almost al forbidden area causing several harbours closed for foreign training ships. The coastguard was ordered to fire at once and the disastrous results of this policy were well known.(2) Further more was the policy of Italy a threat for Turkey and the building of 35.000 ton battleships by Italy a serious issue.

Notes
1. Signed on 24 July 1923 settling the conflict between the Ottoman Empire an the Allies consisting of the British Empire, France, Japan, Greece and Romania.
2. Op 14 July 1934 was one British navy officer killed when the Turkish coastguard fired on a sailing boat of the British cruiser HMS Devonshire off Samos.
3. The displacement of the Italian Littorio-class battleships consisting of the Littorio, Vittiorio Veneto, Roma and Impero was in fact much larger and varied between the 45.029 and 45.585 tons!

British cruisers HMS Castor and Constance to be stricken according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1935 no. 4

An item reported that as a result of the naval treaties the British 3.750 ton cruisers HMS Castor (1) and Constance with an armament of 5-15cm/5.9” and 2-7,5cm/3” anti aircraft guns and a speed of 29 miles were decommissioned wit the intention to sell both ships. The N.M.R. dated 30 May 1935 reported that both cruisers were just 20 years old just still very suitable for escort tasks. Due to the well maintenance were ships of 20 years still not worn out.

Notes
1. C-class Cambrian-sub class light cruiser, laid down by Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, England on 28 October 1914, launched on 28 July 1915, completed en commissioned in November 1915, decommissioned in May 1935 and sold to be broken up on 30 July 1935.
2. C-class light cruiser, laid down by Cammell Laird, Birkenhead, England on 25 January 195, launched on 12 September 1915m completed and commissioned in January 1916, decommissioned in March 1931 and sold to be broken up on 8 June 1936. 

Dutch sailing passenger ship (ex-Dierkow 1963-1997) Tolkien 1997-

Rostock, Germany 11 August 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 7017064, MMSI 244496000 and call sign PFRB. Ex-Dierkow renamed January 1997. Built by Schiffswerft Edgar Andre, Magdeburg, Germany in 1963. 

Dutch steamship Gouverneur Generaal. ‘s Jacob underway from the Netherlands towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 23rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the Dutch steamship G.G. ‘s Jacob underway from Amsterdam, Netherlands towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Dutch East Indies-flagged, homeport Batavia, horsepower 200hp, call sign TDMB and net capacity 4.440,33 cubic metres/1.569,02 tons of ,2,83 cubic metres. 

German bark Adolph underway from Germany towards Hong Kong according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 23rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the German bark Adolph underway from Hamburg, Germany towards Hong Kong. 

British ship Baron Blantyre underway from England towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 23rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship Baron Blantyre underway from Cardiff, England towards Anjer for further orders. 

German bark Parnass under way from Germany towards the Philippines according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 23rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the German bark Parnass under way from Hamburg, Germany towards Manila, Philippines. 

British ship Gateacre underway from South Africa towards Thailand according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 24 August 1889

An item dated 23rd reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship Gateacre underway from Table Bay, South Africa towards Bangkok, Thailand. 

Soviet marine traffic radio station at Leba, Poland according to a CIA report dated 30 October 1951

An item reported the presence of a Soviet radio station at ulica Kosciuszki 84, Leba, Poland in a one story house. It accommodated six men including an officer all army dressed. Each month were the men replaced. Social contact with the population of Leba was not allowed and since the Soviet take over the house were no Polish seen in the house. The officer had occasionally contact with the Polish commanding officer of the WOP [border guard] unit in Leba. The major part of their needed supplies was brought with a Soviet trawler visiting the harbour. The radio station was movable and fitted out with 2 high masts and antenna placed in the courtyard. Although the actually purposes of the radio station were unknown was believed that it was used for checking ship traffic in the Baltic Sea area.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R009100390007-6

Friday, 23 February 2018

German navy harbour tug FGS Langeness (Y819) 1986-


Rostock, Germany 12 August 2016

Germany-flagged, IMO 8603092, MMSI 211212140 and call sign DRLS. Gross tonnage 278 tons, net tonnage 83 tons, deadweight 45/60 tons, full load displacement 445 tons and as dimensions 28,00 (between perpendiculars)-30,25 x 9,10 x 2,55 metres. Bollard pull. Type 725 harbour tug/ sister ships Lütje Horn, Knechtsand, Schärhorn, Vogelsand and Nordstrand. Laid down by Orenstein&Koppel, Lubeck, Germany on 1 April 1986, launched on 28  November 1986 and commissioned on 15 May 1987. 

British Royal Navy ordered building motor torpedo boats according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine N.M.R. dated 23 January 1936 reported that the British Admiralty ordered 6 torpedo motorboats a decision by many people expected. It was already 13 years ago that the last torpedo motorboats were acquired which were built under the First World War building program. In August 1935 were still 35 torpedo motorboats in service. The new decision was probably a reaction on the 45 knots fast motor torpedo boat now being built by Germany. 

The Soviet coastal submarines building program according to a CIA report dated 7 January 1955

An item reports that the Soviet navy possessed a total of 130 short range submarines of which 35 were considered as obsolete and 47 inactive. The building program of the Soviet Union possible included additional transfer of coastal submarines to Eastern Bloc countries with sea borders.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP91T01172R000200020001-8

Submarine warfare not human according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine N.M.R. dated 16 January 1936 stated that it was pure nonsense to believe that international agreements made a submarine warfare human. 

East Germany obtaining former German Kriegsmarine submarines according to a CIA report dated 7 January 1955

An item reported the possible transfer by the Soviet Union to East Germany of 10 submarines dating from the Second World War belonging to the former German Kriegsmarine seemed to be actually occurred. This transport was probably to get a parity in naval strength between East Germany and West Germany. On the other hand was reported that the East German navy possessed no submarines.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP91T01172R000200020001-8

Poland obtaining Soviet coastal submarines according to a CIA report dated 7 January 1955

An item reported that the Soviet Union transferred one coastal submarine to Poland. The Polish navy numbered now four submarines of the short range type of which three were built just before the Second World War.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP91T01172R000200020001-8

Italian car carrier Grande Spagna 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Italy-flagged, homeport Palermo, Italy, IMO 9227924, MMSI 247056200 and call sign IBTD. Built by Uljanik Shipyard, Pula, Crotia in 2002. Owned and managed by Grimaldi Group, Naples, Italy. 

French privateer l’Espérance of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Jean Etienne. Measurement 4 tons, armament of 2 swivels and a crew numbering 23 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925

French privateer l; Elisabeth 1704 and 1711

Commanding officer Nicolas Geraldin. Of the crown.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Russée of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Antoine Gentil. Measurement 30 tons, armament of 4 guns and a crew numbering 45 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

German inland patrol craft P 13


Rostock, Germany 11 August 2016

Dutch steam trawler Begonia (IJM 135) sold within the Netherlands and renamed Ancor according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

An item reported that the by C.D. van Vrede, Ijmuiden, bought steel built steam trawler Begonia (IJM 135) of 161,22 gross register tons was retaken into service and renamed Ancor. She was built by Cochrane and Cooper, Beverley, England ion 1894. 

Dutch trawler Baldur sold towards Norway and renamed Havlyn according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 March 1937

An item reported that the Dutch trawler Baldur of 247 gross tonnage, built by Wilton, Rotterdam, Netherlands in 1906 was sold by the N.V. Shamrock I (N.V. De Vern), Ijmuiden, Netherlands was sold to Govert Grindhaug, Haugesund, Norway and renamed Havlyn. 

Dutch steel built motor cutter Vijf Gebroeders (SCH 44) sold towards France according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 March 1937

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor cutter Vijf Gebroeders (SCH 44) of master L. Pronk, Scheveningen, Netherlands was sold to a French company at Leraux, France. Before she was delivered was she to be fitted out with a new 200hp Deutz diesel engine by the firm Gebr. Speetjens, Geertruidenberg, Netherlands. 

Dutch steam trawler Johanna sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 19 March 1937

An item reported that the Dutch steam trawler Johanna laid up for quite some time was sold by the rederij M. Hof, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to master G, Smits. She was now docked at Ijmuiden to be fitted out. 

Thursday, 22 February 2018

Russian, Bulgarian and Romanian anti submarine warfare Poti-class corvettes 1960s-2005


Project 204 of which 66 units were built for the Soviet, Romanian and Bulgarian navies between 1960-1968, serving in the Soviet navy until the late 1980 and in the Bulgarian navy even in the 21st Century with the last 3 decommissioned in 2005. . Preceded by the Kronshtadt-class/Project 122bis and succeeded by the Pauk-class/Project 1241.2 Molniya-2. In the Bulgarian navy served the Khrabi, Strogi, Bezstrashni, Letjahhi, Bditelni and Naporisti and in the Romanian navy 3 units.

Displacement 508 9standard)-589 (full load) tons and as dimensions 59,4 x 7,9 x 2,0 metres pt 195 x 25.11 x 6.7 feet. The 2 gas turbines supplying 30.000shp and the 2 diesels supplied via 2 shafts 8.000 shp allowed a maximum speed of 38 knots. The range was with a speed of 10 knots 4.500 nautical miles and with maximum speed 520 nautical miles. The crew numbered 80 men. Armament consisted of 1x2-5,7cm/2,2 guns, and 4-40,6cm/16” anti submarine torpedo tubes although other unites of the class were armed with 2-53,3cm/2” torpedo tubes and 2 RBU-6000 anti submarine rockers (Romanian and early Soviet units had the RBU-2500). 

Polish submarine leaving the harbour of Gydnia, Poland according to a Cia report dated 9 April 1953

The Orzel sister ship of the Sep

An item reported that the Polish submarine lying in the harbour of Gdynia departed from the shipyard towards open sea in 16 December 1952.(1) Although fitted out with a saw-shaped net cutter on the bow there was no sign of a snorkel. At that moment were on the conning tower 4 men standing of which 2 officers according to their caps, another four men on the fore and three more in the fantail. All men not being officers were dressed in canvas overalls. The observer saw none leather suits. A last remark was that this seemed to be the only operational Polish submarine.(2)

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP80-00810A000600290003-1.

Notes
1. After the Second World War became Poland a communist government part of the Eastern Bloc until 1989 when Poland became the independent Republic of Poland.
2. The Sep of the Orzel-class, laid down by the Rotterdamsche Doogdok Maatschappij, Rotterdam, Netherlands in November 1936, launched on 17 October 1938, completed in April 1939 and stricken in September 1969?

The fleet of the Bulgarian navy according to a CIA report dated 27 June 1951

The Bulgarian navy consisted of the following units:
4 300 ton minelayers, armed with 2 torpedo tubes and 1 small gun, built in 1905 although several times refitted and modernized and of which one was not longer seaworthy
6-60 ton German torpedo boats armed with 1 torpedo tube and a heavy machinegun. A number according to rumours to be increased by torpedo boats to hand over by the Soviet Union.
1-1.200 light destroyer used for training purposed purchased from the Soviet Union in 1950 for strengthening the Black Sea fleet.
2 submarines were underway from the Soviet Union for which the crew were trained at Sevastopol.
4/5 small minesweepers
In times of war were merchant ships to be added to the navy

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R008000300010-3

Dutch wind farm service vessel Offshore Phantom

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

United Kingdom-flagged, MMSI 235083747 and call sign 2EBO7. Owned by Acta Marine, Den Helder, Netherlands. 

British fish freighter Mastwing sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Mastwing of 199 gross and 71 net tons and built at Goole, England in 1908 in to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

French privateer chaloupe l’Heureuse of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Jean Derycksen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

British fish freighter Willet sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Willet of 199 gross and 73 net tons and built at Goole, England in 1908 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Vigilant II sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Vigilant II of 297 gross and 114 net tons and built at Glasgow, Scotland in 1908 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter New Zealand sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter New Zealand of 290 gross and 116 net tons and built at Hull, England in 1898 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Cypriot reefer (ex-Reefer Jambu 1985-1996) Ice Rose 1996-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 8311106, MMSI 538004733 and call sign V7YT9. Ex-Reefer Jambu renamed August 1996. Owned and managed by Maestro Shipmanagement, Limassol, Cyprus. Built by Hyundai Heavy Industries, Ulsan, South Korea in 1985. 

Dutch chiampan Schiedam around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chiampan Brouwershaven around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoupe Winthond around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Used for all kind of purposes. Was to replace the Swarte Pot at Palembang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoupe Zalm around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Used for all kind of purposes.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Dutch chialoupe Swarte Pot around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. Condemned and not worthy any repaired decided to be laid up. The Windhond was to replaced her at Palambang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Bulgarian army amphibious transport PTS 1965


The National Museum of Military History, Sofia, Bulgaria

Soviet built, medium-sized with a weight of 22.700kg. Used for transporting army unites, wheeled machinery, guns, ammunition and so on. Also used for sea landings. Used by the Bulgarian navy since 1965. Crew numbers 2 men. The 12cylinder 359hp allows a maximum speed at land of 42 kilometres and a range of 300 kilometres with a speed in the water if 10-12 kilometres. 

Dutch salvage vessel Buffel sold to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 23 July 1937

An item reported that the Dutch salvage vessel Buffel built in 1891 was sold by the N.V. W.A. van der Tak’s Bergingsvaartuig. Rotterdam, Netherlands to a Dutch firm to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Swift sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Swift of 242 gross and 94 net tons and built Howden, England in 1897 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

British fish freighter Hornsea sold towards the Netherlands to be broken up according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 11 December 1936

An item reported that the British Hull Steam Fishing and Ice Company Limited, Hull, England at that moment in liquidation sold her fish freighter Hornsea of 305 gross and 126 net tons and built at Hull, England in 1900 to the N.V. Holland, Hendrik-Ido-Ambacht, Netherlands to be broken up. 

Dutch fishing vessel Njord sold toward France and renamed Roger-Juliette according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 10 January 1936

An item reported that the Dutch fishing vessel Njord of 154 gross tons and was built by the Wed. C. Boele, Slikkerveer, Netherlands in 1916 was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Mercurius, Vlaardingen, Netherlands to A. Tarin&Yvon, Paimpol, France and renamed Roger-Juliette. 

German general cargo ship Fokko Ukena 2007-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 February 2018

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport St. John’s, IMO 9375812, MMSI 304089000 and call sign V2GU3. Built by Slovenske Lodenice Komarno A.S., Komarno, Slovakia in 2007. Earlier Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, call sign 9HYA8 and MMSI 256586000. Owned by MS Fokko Ukena Bojen Reederei GmbH&Co. KG, Moormerland, Germany and managed by Vertom-Bojen Bereederungs GmbH&Co. KG, Moormerland, Germany. 

Dutch chialoup Brak around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built by the company herself. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service by for instance the water fiscal.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch small chialoup Nagtegaal around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch chialoup Kasteel Batavia around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies where she was used for daily service. Built at the island Onrust, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

China intended to build 500 motor gunboats with Soviet support according to a CIA report dated 8 August 1951

An item reported the building by China of 500 motor gunboats Canton, China within just 3 months with the support of Soviet technicians. Supervisor was Ao-ssu-fu-ssu-chi of the Militrr Defence Headquarters of the South Chiba Coastal Defnce General headquarters. This Soviet advisor was furthermore appointed as supervisor for the building of defence installations. The machinery needed for the gunboats existed of new purchased, engines and reconditioned engines taken out of old trucks but the major part came out of around 350 Soviet made trucks.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R007900210001-5

Bulgarian navy torpedo launcher OTAM-53-206


The National Museum of Military History, Sofia, Bulgaria

Manufactured in the Soviet Union and since 1967 used by the Bulgarian Navy. With a length of 8,680 metres and a weight of 920 kilo used for launching 53,34cm torpedoes against surface targets over a maximum distance of 8 kilometres. 

Shipyard No. 12 at Danzig, Poland replaced by workshops of the Gdansk Maritime Office according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 12 at Danzig, Poland on the western part of the Slaski quay was replaced by the workshops of the Gdansk Maritime Office (Gdanski Urzad Morski). Their main purpose was repairing tugs, cutters and motor torpedo boats belonging to the Polish navy and the WOP.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

Shipyard No. 3 at Gdansk, Poland used for repairs according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the Shipyard No. 3 belonging to the United Shipyards at Gdansk, Poland was the former Wagon Works shipyard. This yard was apparently not used for new building but for repairs of small (fishing) vessels.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

The Shipyard No. 2 at Gdansk, Poland according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 2 belonging to the United Shipyards at Danzig, Poland was the former Schichau Shipyard consisting of 6 slips numbered from the north to the south. All ships were used except for the sixth one. On each of the slips No.’s 1 and 2 was a 3.000 ton merchant ship under construction; the one on slip No. 1 nearing completion. On slip No. 3 was a merchant ship around 4.000 ton and on slip No. 4 of around 5.000 ton under construction. On slip No. 5 was the keel laid down of a merchant ship of which the tonnage was yet not known. In an addition to the original text was said that at this slip the 2.500 tons measuring Zaporzhe [Zaporozhye?] was launched built for the Soviet Union.

The same shipyard built the 4.000 tons merchant ship ss Gdansk, Gdynia, Lodz and Warszawa now to be completed. The Warszawa was dry docked for painting hull and placing of the screw. The bridges over the first four slips were with 60 metres lengthened landwards. To each bridge were two2-5 ton mobile cranes built by the Elblag Shipyard added. In the summer were the building of two machine workshops in the north part of the shipyard standing completed and was started with the building of several more building in the same area.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

The Shipyard No. 1 at Gdansk, Poland according to a CIA report dated 13 March 1952

An item reported that the shipyard No. 1 belonging to the United Shipyards at Gdansk, Poland was the former Danzig Shipyard. A new slip was at that moment under construction. The 2.500 ton Kriwoj Rog built for the Soviet Union was now being fitted out. There were several fishing trawlers measuring around 800 tons built by this shipyard. As ship’s names were given Radunia, San, Nysa and the Dalmor 1-6 belonging to the Bug-class with a deadweight of around 670 tons.

A second item dealing with this shipyard reported that a tanker with a gross tonnage of around 8.000 was refitted and to be added to the Polish merchant fleet. Furthermore were several nay trawlers repaired and 4 navy tugs under construction.

Source
The report was published on www.archive.org, document number CIA-RDP82-00457R010600390007-9

Tuesday, 20 February 2018

British torpedo gunboat HMS Spanker 1888-1920

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original url
Visiting IJmuiden, Netherlands April 1911

Of the Sharpshooter-class. Laid down by Devonport Dockyard, England on 12 April 1888, launched on 22 February 1889, commissioned on 17 October 1890, reclassified as minesweeper in 1909 and sold to the Cornish Salvage Company, Ilfracombe to be broken up on 20 March 1920.

Displacement 735 tons and as dimensions 70 (between perpendiculars)-74 (over all) x 8,2 x 2,59 metres or 230-242 x 27 x 8.6 feet. Machinery consisted of 2 tripe expansion steam engines and locomotive boilers (replaced between 1895-1898 by Du Temple boilers) and supplying via 2 screws 2.500ihp (natural draught)-3.600ihp (forced draught) allowing a speed of 19 knots and a range of 2.500 nautical miles with a speed of 10 knots. Her crew numbered. Original armament consisted of 5-36cm/14” torpedo tubes, 2-12cm/4.7” quick firing guns and 4-3pd guns. After her conversion into a minesweepers were the torpedo tubes removed and was she fitted out with minesweeping gear. 

French privateer l’Espérance of Dunkirk 1709

Commanding officer Asselin Claissen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Espérance 1711

Commanding officer Pierre Desprez. Measurement 35 tons, armament of 4 guns and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 12 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer l’Entreprenante of Dunkirk 1710

Commanding officer Pierre Clou. Measurement 110 tons and a crew numbering 10 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925

The Bulgarian revolutionaires lead by Hrisot Botev hijacking the Austrian river steamship Radetzki according to the Dutch newspaper Leeuwarder courant dated 8 December 1876



National Museum, Veliko Tarnovo, Bulgaria

An item referred to tidings received from Belgrade reporting that Serbian policemen searched the Austrian mail boat Radetzki releasing the Bulgarian refugees sent with the help of the police towards Galatz, Romania. The demand of her master to let the refugees on board of his ship was neglected by the Serbians. Another Dutch newspaper De Maasbode dated 10th December reported that the Austrian representative at Belgrade was ordered to demand complete satisfaction for the violation of the borders by the Serbian police when attacking the Radetzki. To support this command were two monitors sent from Semlin. De Tijd dated 21 June 1876 reported that the Bulgarian gang which recently captured the Austrian steamship Radetzki with the intention to call for a uprising in Bulgaria was defeated by the Turkish.

Built at Obuda, Hungary in 1851 for passengers transport on the Danube between Orsova, Austria-Hungary and Galato, Romania. Was hijacked by Bulgarian revolutionaries when she Bechet [Romania] lead by the poet Hristo Botev to pass the borders without alarming the Ottoman or Romanian governments. The gang was transported to Kozioduy where she was disembarked without spoiling any blood. So the items in the Dutch newspapers were partly not the truth. Hristo Botev (27 December 1847 Kalofer, Bulgaria-20 May 1876 Vola Peak, Vratsa Mountain) and most of his men were indeed killed by Ottoman troops. 

French privateer la Reconnaissance of Dunkirk 1708

Commanding officer Gavois. Measurement 200 tons, armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 102 men and 9 boys.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch chialoup Winthont around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Used at Batavia, Dutch East Indies but was to be sent instead of the Swarte Pot towards Palembang, Dutch East Indies.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch small ship Bombain around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Built of Kiaten timber. Allowed to be used by the king of Bantam. Already undergone some repairs but needed more.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Palliacatte around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at Batavia, Dutch East Indies. New. Built from Kiaten timber, measured around 40 last and expected to serve foq uite a long time.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Dutch yacht Javaanse Bode around 1683

Of the Dutch East Indies Company. Lying at the island Onrust, Dutch East Indies to be repaired. Bought at Japara in 1678 and destined towards Banda, Dutch East Indies where she was to served for quite some time as expected.

Source
Archive Dutch East Indies Company (VOC), National Archive, The Hague inventory number 11250. List of all ships in <1683-1684<. 

Monday, 19 February 2018

British Royal Navy founding floatplane base at Bermuda according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht dated 28 December 1935 reporting that the work started establishing a new floatplane base at Bermuda to b realized within 7 months. Costs 47.000 pound sterling.

USA increased the number of naval air station in the Pacific according to the Dutch newspaper Marineblad dated 1936 no. 2

An item referred to the magazine Marine Rundschau dated January 1936 reporting that the USA increased the number of naval air station in the Pacific in west and south west direction namely on Midway, Johnstone, Wake and Palmyra, Jervis, Howland, Baker and Swainswere. 

Dutch ocean going tug Poolzee sold towards Greece and renamed Marigo Matsas according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 4 November 1932

Source Kon. Mij. De Schelde Archive Machinefabriek en Ketelmakerij 506.182

An item reported that the Dutch ocean going tug Poolzee was sold by L. Smit&Co.’s Sleepdienst, Rotterdam, Netherlands to the Fa. Loucas Matsas&Sons, Piraeus, Greece for around 1.000 pound sterling. She was built by L. Smit&Zn., Kinderdijk, Netherlands in 1900. Horsepower 750ihp and of 304 gross register tons. The edition dated 2 December 1932 reported that she was renamed Marigo Matsas.(1)

Note
1. In 1930 call sign PQKR/POUV, dimensions 134,6 x 27.7 x 12.10 (hold) feet. Engine by the Kon. Mij. De Schelde, Vlissingen, Netherlands ordered on 20 January 1899, arrived on 12 February 1900 and departed on 5 April 1900. 

British motor launch HMS ML175 1940-1946

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original url

Motor Launch of the Fairmile B class motor launches, building ordered in January 1940. Built by James A. Silver Ltd., Dumbarton, Scotland, commissioned on 20 January 1941 and in May 1946 to be disposed. Displacement 85 tons and as dimensions 112 x 18.3 x 6 feet. Horsepower 1.200bhp. 

Dutch screw steam trawler Christina Catharina (IJM 3)sold within the Netherlands and renamed Bloemendaal according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 December 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steel built screw steam trawler Christina Catharina (IJM 3) was sold by the Visscherij Maatschappij Aneta, Ijmuiden, Netherlands to Lansdorp&Kuhn, Ijmuiden and renamed Bloemendaal. Built by the Stettiner Oderwerk A.G., Stettin, Germany in 1917. Of 241,94 gross register tons. 

Dutch survey vessel Zr. Ms. Blommendal cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the Dutch survey vessel Zr. Ms. Blommendal captain Krayenhoff van de Leur coming from Banca, Dutch East Indies.(1)

Note
1. Sail schooner brig, building costs ƒ 119.000,00, on stocks at the shipyard of Huygens&van Gelder, Amsterdam, Netherlands on 10 July 1881, launched 1882, commissioned at Onrust, Dutch East Indies on 11 January 1883, decommissioned on 29 August 1899, became pilot station ship on the river of Palembang, Dutch East Indies, displacement 300 tons and as dimensions 28,5 x 8,5 x 4,22 metres, an armament of 2 medium rifles 7cm guns and a crew numbering 71 men (1888: 29 Europeans, 42 natives). 

British ship Asia arrived in the Dutch East Indies coming from the USA according to the Dutch newspaper Java-Bode dated 20 August 1889

An item dated Batavia, Dutch East Indies 19th reported the arrival of the British ship Asia master Hilton coming from New York, USA. Shipping agents Handelsvereeniging “Amsterdam”. 

Dutch minesweeper Hr. Ms. (ex-Kalgoorlie 1942-1946) Ternate 1946-1961

Noord-Hollands Archief. Original source

Pennants switched regularly MV16 since 15 July 1946, PK3 since 15 September 1946, P since 15 January 1947, M816 since 15 October 1950 and F812 since 15 October 1952. Part of the Batjan- class or Ambon-class consisting Ambon, Banda, Batjan, Boeroe, Ceram, Morotai, Ternate and Tidore of the as part of the Australian Bathurst-class ocean going minesweepers. During the Second World War used as escort vessels and corvettes. Since 1947 were the ships used as patrol vessels, since 1950 classified as minesweepers but instead again used for patrol tasks in the waters of Netherlands New Guinea and in the Netherlands Antilles and Surinam and for the fishery protection in Dutch territorial waters. Since 1952 classified as frigates.

Laid down by Broken Hill, Whyalia, Australia on 25 July 1940 and launched on 7 August 1941. The former HMAS Kalgoorlie (J. 192) of the Royal Australian Navy. Commissioned as the HMS Kalgoorlie of the Royal Netherlands Navy at Melbourne, Australia on 8 May 1946, departed towards Makassar, Dutch East Indies on 28 June 1946, renamed and commissioned as the Hr. Ms. Termate on 12 August 1946. Since 1956 added to the Technical Training of the Royal Netherlands Navy (TOKM) at Amsterdam, Netherlands and sold on 21 September 1961 to be broken up. 

French privateer la Surprenant of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Toussaint Gavelle. Measurement 28 tons, armament of 4 guns and 4 swivels and a crew numbering 47 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Subtile of Dunkirk 1706

Commanding officer Toussaint Gavelle.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer le Furet of Dunkirk 1708

Commanding officer Jacques Dunes. Measurement 4 tons, armament of 4 swivels and a crew numbering 18 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Fortune of Dunkirk 1711

Commanding officer Du Guay. Armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 170 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

French privateer la Tour de Montfort of Dunkirk 1703

Commanding officer Cornil Eldersen.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.

Dutch motor lugger Burgemeester Schokking (KW 65) sold within the Netherlands according to the Dutch magazine Schip en Werf dated 2 December 1932

An item reported that the Dutch steel built motor lugger Burgemeester Schokking (KW 65) of 103,62 gross register tons and built by Fa. Gebr, Boot, Leiderdorp, Netherlands in 1912 was sold by Gebr. Van der Plas, Katwijk aan Zee to Parlevliet’s  Oliehandel N.V., Ijmuiden, Netherlands. 

French privateer le Zéphir of Dunkirk 1706-1708

Commanding officer Charles de Blanque. Measurement 250 tons, armament of 26 guns and a crew numbering 90 men.

Source
H. Malo. La grande Guerre des Corsaires Dunkerque (1702-1715), published in 1925.