Translate

Friday, 9 December 2016

Dutch general cargo ship Atlantic Dawn 2013-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 16 August 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Urk, Netherlands, IMO 9671450, MMSI 244790606 and call sign PCUS. Built by Shipkits, Groningen, Netherlands in 2013. Owned and managed by Hartman Shipping, Urk, Netherlands. 

German general cargo ship BBC Vesuvius 2012-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 August 2016

Antigua&Barbuda-flagged, homeport Saint John’s, IMO 9508471, MMSI 305865000 and call sign V2GB4. Owned and managed by Briese Schiffahrt, Leer, Germany. Built by Xingang Shipbuilding Heavy Industry, Tianjin, China in 2012. 

British general cargo ship Vectis Harrier 2012-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 August 2016

United Kingdom-flagged, homeport Douglas, Isle of Wight, IMO 9594303, MMSI 235089913 and call sign 2FBR6. Owned and managed by Caris Brooke Shipping UK. Cowes, Isle of Wight. Built by Jiangsu Yangzijang Shipyard, Jiangyin, China in 2012. 

Ukrainian ro-ro cargo ship (ex-Viktor Konchayev 1993-1996, Geministar 1996-1997, Bremer Carrier 1997-May 1998, Nordana Kisumu 1998-1999, Seaboard Chile 1999-2001, Atlantic Cavalier 2001-2003) Atlantic Action 2003-


Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 August 2016

Malta-flagged, homeport Valletta, Malta, IMO 8902319, MMSI 215420000 and call sign 9HNK7. Owned and managed by Atlantic Shipmanagement, Odessa, Ukraine. Built by Nordic Yards Warnemunde, Rostock, Germany in 1993. Ex-Viktor Konchayev 1993-1996, Geministar 1996-1997, Bremer Carrier 1997-May 1998, Nordana Kisumu May 1998-January 1999, Seaboard Chile January 1999-February 2001 and Atlantic Cavalier February 2001-May 2003. 

Japanese potential troop transport Saikai Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 2.319 tons, gross tonnage 3.708 tons, transport capacity 1.200 men and owned by Kokusai Kisen Kaisha (K.K.K.). Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Nagano Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 2.343 tons, gross tonnage 3.810 tons, transport capacity 1.300 men and owned by (Nippon Yusen Kaisha (N.Y.K). Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

British harbours protected with chain barrages according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item reported that the British harbours in the south including the harbour of Malta were to be protected with a chain barrage against torpedo boat attacks in wartime. For this purpose were some aged and worthless corvettes and gunboats to be used. 

British destroyer HMS Teazer harassed by problems during trial according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item referred to the magazine Engineering reporting that during the 27 miles trial of the British destroyer Teazer after her achieving during 2 hours a speed of 27,67 suddenly her two most aft compartments were filled with water probably due to a broken bracket causing an immediately end of her trial. The watertight doors worked perfect and she was able to return to Cowes, England. She had left the yard of J.S. White at Cowes on 13th July to execute her trials.(1)

Note
1. Launched by J. Samuel White, East Cowes, Isle of Wight on 9 February 1895 and sold to be broken up on 9 July 1912. Part of the Conflict-class consisting of the Conflict, Teazer and Wizard, preceded by the Fervent-class and succeeded by the Handy-class. 

British destroyer HMS Bat executing trials according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item referred to the magazine le Yacht reporting that the British destroyer Bat executed coal consumption tests. With a speed of 30 miles she used 1,15kilo/ihp/hour and with a speed of 13 miles 1,06 kilo/ihp/hour. She performed satisfying during her speed trials. On 14 July was her second 3 hours full speed trial, with as best run over the measured mile a speed of 32 miles and a medium speed of 20,229 miles. Horsepower 6.189 ihp at 400 rpm, boiler pressure 233 (start)-250 pound.(1)

Note
1. Laid down by Palmers Shipbuilding and Iron Company, Jarrow, England on 28 May 1896, launched on 7 October 1896, commissioned in August 1897, laid up in the reserve in 1919 and sold to be broken up on 10 June 1919. Built under the 1895-1896 shipbuilding programme as one of the 3-funnelled 4 so-called 30-knotter destroyers of the Star-class consisting of the Bat, Chamois, Crane, Fawn, Flirst, Flying Fish, Stard and Whiting. 

Dutch cutter Dirkje (TH-10) 1990-

Leaving locks to inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 17 August 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Tholen, Netherlands, call sign PDQX and id no. NLD199001065. Built at Scheepswerf van Santen, Schiedam, Netherlands and completed by Scheepswerf Padmos, Stellendam, Netherlads in 1990. 

French destroyer Cimeterre (1911) in 1923

Launched at Soc. de la Gironde, Bordeaux, France in 1911, completed in 1912, displacement 876 tons, horsepower 13.500hp, machinery consisted of oil fired direct drive turbines and an armament of 2-3.9” guns, 4-9pd guns and 4 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Bouclier (1911) in 1923

Launched at Normand, Le Havre, France in 1911, completed in 1912, displacement 777 tons, horsepower 13.000 hp, machinery consisted of oil fired direct drive turbines and an armament of 2-3.9” guns, 4-9pd guns and 4 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Commandant Bory (1912) in 1923

Launched at Dyle et Bacalan, Bordeaux, France in 1912, completed in 1914, displacement 750 tons, horsepower 14.115 hp, machinery consisted of oil fired direct drive turbines and an armament of 2-3.9” guns, 4-9pd guns and 4 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Commandant Rivière (1912) in 1923

Launched at S. de la Gironde, Bordeaux, France in 1912, completed in 1913, displacement 755 tons, horsepower 14.500 hp, machinery consisted of oil fired direct drive turbines and an armament of 2-3.9” guns, 4-9pd guns and 4 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Capitaine Mehl (1912) in 1923

Launched at Soc. de la Loire, St. Nazaire, France in 1912, completed in 1913, displacement 755 tons, horsepower 15.000 hp, machinery consisted of oil fired direct drive turbines and an armament of 2-3.9” guns, 4-9pd guns and 4 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

Dutch trawler (ex-Jan Senior 1992-2002) Joris Senior (ARM-18) 2002-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 14 August 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnhem, IMO 9048677, MMSI 246057000 and call sign PFBR. Owned and managed by Meulmeester Visserijbedrijf, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Ex-Jan Senior renamed 2002. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1992. 

Greek bulk carrier Amorgos 2014-

Schelde off Vlissingen, Netherlands 21 August 2016

Marshall Islands-flagged, IMO 9646716, MMSI 538005267 and call sign V7CI5. Managed by owned by Ariston Navigation, Athens, Greece in 2014. Built by Jinling Shipyard, Nanjing, China. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Akikaze in 1922

Laid down at Mitsubishi, Japan in June 1920, launched in December 1920 and completed in March 1921.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Shiokaze in 1922

Laid down at Maizuru, Japan in May 1920, launched in October 1920 and completed in August 1921.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Hakaze in 1922

Laid down at Mitsubishi, Japan in November 1918, launched in June 1920 and completed in September 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Sawakaze in 1922

Laid down at Mitsubishi/Nagasaki in January 1918, launched in January 1919and completed in March 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Yakaze in 1922

Laid down at Mitsubishi, Japan in August 1918, launched in April 1920 and completed in July 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Nadakaze in 1922

Laid down at Maizuru, Japan in January 1920, launched June 1920 and completed in September 1921

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Shimikaze in 1922

Laid down at Maizuru, Japan in September 1919, launched in March 1920 and completed in November 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Okikaze in 1922

Laid down at Maizuru in February 1919, launched in October 1919 and completed in August 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese destroyer 1st class Minekaze in 1922

Laid down at Maizuru in April 1918, launched in February 1919 and completed in May 1920.

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army with the general technical characteristics of the Japanese modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

General technical characteristics of the modern 1.345 ton 1st class destroyers. Displacement 1.345 tons and as dimensions 320’ (between perpendiculars)-336.6” (over all) x 29’3” x 9”6”. High short forecastle, deadwood and stern cut away. The machinery consisted of Brown Curtiss high pressure and low pressure backing turbines with reduction gears on each shaft and without cruising turbines except the destroyers built at Mitsubishi and Nagasaki which were fitted out with Parsons turbines with Parsons rigid frame reduction gear, straight tube condensers and 4 small tube oil fired Kwansei boilers supplying 37.000-38.500 hp via 2 screws allowing a speed of 34 (design)-37/41 (trials) knots. Cylindrical steam and mud drums blowers with straight tubes 1-1.8” except about 4 rows bear outside that are curved at the mud drums and 3” outside rows also curved at mud drums. With an oil bunker capacity of around 315 tons and an economical speed of 16 knots was their range 4.000 nautical miles. Blowers comparable with Sirocco blowers. Turning circle 450-500 yards. Roll completed in 8 seconds. The armament consisted of 4x1-4.7” guns 40 cal in center line (1 forecastle, 1 deckhouse between funnels, 1 deckhouse abaft tunnels, 1 deckhouse aft resulting in 1 firing ahead, 4 broadside and 1 aft), 2 machineguns on bridge wings, 3x2-21” torpedo tubes on center line 1 in well abaft forecastle, 1 just forward of main mast and 1 abaft mainmast for which 6 torpedoes were carried (6 in tubes, 4 reloads) and 2 mine tracks aft. Fitted out for minesweeping. Two 30” search lights. Four boats, Two funnels. Two masts. Crew numbered 148 men.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese submarine No. 68 in 1922

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details. He noted that especially dealing with submarines all information were kept secret ant that hardly was possible to obtain any details.

To be laid down at Sasebo, Japan in 1922. None further details were known except that the surfaced displacement exceeded the 1.000 tons.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Japanese submarine No. 63 in 1922

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details. He noted that especially dealing with submarines all information were kept secret ant that hardly was possible to obtain any details.

To be laid down at Sasebo, Japan in 1922. None further details were known except that the surfaced displacement exceeded the 1.000 tons.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese submarine No. 62 in 1922

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details. He noted that especially dealing with submarines all information were kept secret ant that hardly was possible to obtain any details.

To be laid down at Sasebo, Japan in 1922. None further details were known except that the surfaced displacement exceeded the 1.000 tons.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese submarine No. 46 in 1922

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details. He noted that especially dealing with submarines all information were kept secret ant that hardly was possible to obtain any details.

Laid down around the end of March 1921, launched on 3 December 1921 at Kawasaki, Japan. Nothing was known about this type of submarine except that it was not a Fiat-Laurenti type earlier built at this shipyard.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Japanese submarine No. 44 in 1922

The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details. He noted that especially dealing with submarines all information were kept secret ant that hardly was possible to obtain any details.

Laid down around the end of February 1921, launched on 29 November 1921 at Kure, Japan. She was the first of this type to be built. Displacement while surfaced over 1.000 tons.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

The Japanese battleship Kaga according to Dutch Naval Intelligence reports dated 1 February 1922


The military liaison officer at the Dutch embassy at Japan supplied in his letter dated Tokyo, Japan 1 February 1922 to the supreme command of the Dutch army a lot of details dealing with the Japanese navy. The attachments were in English and not translated by him to prevent a wrong translation of the technical details.

Dealing with the 39.900 tons battleship Kaga (1) he wrote that she was launched at the Kawasaki Dockyard, Kobe on 17 December 1921 with her keel laid down on 20 July 1920. Dimensions 715 x 100 x 30.9 feet. The blister started well forward and was about 6 feet amidship. The machinery consisted of 4 sets Brown Curtiss geared turbines and 24 small tube boilers. Her speed was 23 knots. The armament consisted of 10-16” 45 cal guns, 20-5.5” 50 cal guns, 4-3” 40 cal guns and 8-20” torpedo tubes (4 submerged and 4 above water). He remarked especially that the number of 16” guns was not official, but that the press continuously reported 10 guns with this calibre. The extra tonnage of the Kaga and her sister ship was a result of the increased armour and fuel capacity but not by the additional 16” guns. The designed range for both ships was reported to be 9.500 nautical miles. The Kaga and Tosa launched in respectively November and December 1921 were to be stricken when the Washington Naval Treaty was ratified. In pencil is for the name of the Kaga written: aircraft carrier.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Note
1. Of the Tosa-class dreadnought battleships, laid down at the Kawasaki Shipyard, Kobe, Japan on 19 July 1920, launched on 17 November 1921 and was to be completed on 25 December 1922. Instead she was converted into an aircraft carrier, commissioned on 31 March 1928, rebuilt 1933-1935 and sunk during the Battle of the Midway against the allied forces on 4 June 1942. 

Thursday, 8 December 2016

Preliminary design no. 186 for an American submarine chaser dated 22-11-1917


Design drawn after the Special Board on Anti Submarine Devices asked on 28 October 1917 for such a vessel. Navy Chief Constructor David W. Taylor (1) supplied on 5 November general technical details resulting in a design on 22 November. After seeing this design on 26 December Taylor discussed it two days later with Henry Ford (2). It became a principal base for the Eagle Boat in

Normal displacement 475 tons and as dimensions 200 (waterline/overall) x 24’ (extreme on waterline) x 6’6”. Freeboard maximum at Stem 12’0”and A.P. 8’0” and freeboard at side M.P. 10’9”. Total depth at M.P. measured at . Of uppermost strength D.K. 17’8”. Deck height 8’. Metacenter above base 10.50, C. of G. above base 9.15, G.M. 1.35;, moment to trim 1” 93 ft-tons and trim even keel. Tons per inch immersion 8.0. Coefficient at normal displacement of 475 tons longitudinal .582, midship .917 and displacement-length 59.4.

The turbine machinery delivered 2.460 ehp at a speed of 21 knots. With a speed of 10 knots was the range 3.500 nautical miles. Length boiler room for 16’6” and aft 16’6” and engine room 33’0”, total machine space 66’0”. Two boiler rooms/

Weight hull 174.0, hull fittings 28.9, steam engineering 93.0, reserve feed 10.0, battery 14.2, ammunition 21.4, equipment 15.0, outfit and 2.3 stores 36.2, full oil 2.3 full supply 65.0 and margin 17.3, total normal displacement 475 tons, light 337 tons and emergency 551 tons.

The armament consisted of 1-5” gun and 1-3” anti aircraft gun.

Source 
The so-called Spring Styles Book 1 (March 1911-September 1925). Naval History and Heritage Command. Lot S-584-11. Preliminary designs prepared by mostly civilians working at the Bureau of Construction and Repair (succeeded by the Bureau of Ships nowadays the Naval Sea Systems Command) under supervision of naval architects of the Navy Construction Corps. A major part of the drawings was presented to the General Board which advices the Secretary of the Navy.

Notes
1. David Watson Tyler (4 March 1864 Louisa County, Virginia, USA-28 July 1940 Washington, D.C., USA), naval architect and engineer ending his naval career in the rank of rear admiral.
2. Henry Ford (30 July 1863 Greenfield Township, Michigan, USA-7 April 1947 Fair Lane, Dearborn, Michigan, USA), industrialist, well known for developing mass production while use the assemble line technique. 

French destroyer Spahi (1908) in 1923

Launched at F. et C. de la Méditerranée, Le Havre, France in 1908, completed in 1910, displacement 449 tons, horsepower 8.200hp, oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-9d gun, 6-3pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Mameluck (1909) in 1923

Launched at Soc. de la Loire, Nantes, France in 1909, completed in 1911, displacement 400 tons, horsepower 7.750 hp, oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-9d gun, 6-3pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Poiguard (1909) in 1923

Launched at Rochefort Dockyard, France in 1909, completed in 1911, displacement 417 tons, horsepower 6.800 hp, oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-9d gun, 6-3pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Glaive (1908) in 1923

Launched at Rocheford Dockyard, France in 1908, completed in 1910, displacement 352 tons, horsepower 6.800 hp, oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-9d gun, 6-3pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

French destroyer Massue (1908) in 1923

Launched at Toulon Dockyard, France in 1908, completed in 1909, displacement 344 tons, horsepower 7.128 hp, oil fired reciprocating machinery and an armament of 1-9d gun, 6-3pd guns and 2 torpedo tubes.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

Italian navy ship (ex-Grossherzog von Oldenburg 1906-1921) Città di Milano 1921-1943

Our thanks to Lazer_one for the drawings

Built at Schichau F. Werft, Danzig, Germany with yard number 771 as the cable layer ss Grossherzog von Oldenburg for account of the Norddeutsche Seekabelwerke AG in 1906. Ceded to the Italian government due to war reparations in 1921 still on her original navy and since 1921 at the Città di Milano from the Italian navy. Served in 1928 as support ship of the airship Italia of Umberto Nobile. Scuttled at Savona on 9 September 1943. Gross register tonnage 2.691 tons and as dimensions 92,6 x 12,7 metres. Machinery consisted of 2 triple steam engines allowing a speed of 12 knots. 

French auxiliary cruisers sunk off Mytilene, Greece according to the Dutch newspaper De Tijd dated 1 June 1916

An item dated Athens, Greece 1 June reported that the two ships of the combined fleet of which the loss by tidings from Mytilene was reported, were both French auxiliary cruisers. Both hit mines and sunk immediately without survivors. 

French naval personnel strength allowed to increase according to the Dutch newspaper Bataviaasch nieuwsblad dated 29 March 1939

An item dated Paris, France 28th reported the approved increase of the personnel strength of the French navy from 749.000 to 775.000 men. The enlistment of new personnel started immediately. 

Modernisation of American battleships USS New Mexico, Mississippi and Idaho approved according to the Dutch newspaper De Tribune dated 17 January 1931

USS New Mexico

An item reported that the American Senate with 73 against 13 votes approved a budget of 30 million US dollars needed for the modernizing of 3 battleships. Another newspaper Algemeen Handelsblad dated 25th reported that the Naval Fleet Committee of the House of Representatives approved the modernisation of the USS New Mexico (1), Mississippi (2) and Idaho (3). The De Maasbode dated 18th reported that the reason that so many senators supported the budget was simply to preserve/create employment.

Notes
1. Nicknamed “The Queen’. Ordered in 1914 was she laid down at the New York Navy Yard on 14 October 1915, launched on 13 April two years later while christened by Miss Margaret Cabeza De Baca and a year later on 20 May 1918, at Philadelphia between March 1931-January extensively modernized, decommissioned on 19 June 1946 was she on 25 February of the next year stricken. Her scrapping started on 24 November and was July 1948 finished. With a clipper bow. Of the New Mexico-class with as sister ships the Idaho and the Mississippi, which succeeded the Pennsylvania-class and which was at her turn succeeded by the Tennessee-class. The reason that the New Mexico-class was nothing more than an improved design of her predecessor instead of a complete new for a 12-140,5cm battleships was lacking enough budget which was denied by Secretary of Navy Josephus Daniels.
2. BB-41. Laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding on 5 April 1915, launched on 25 January 1917, commissioned on 18 December 1917, stricken on 30 July 1956, decommissioned on 17 September 1956 and broken up in 1957.
3. BB-42. Laid down by the New York Shipbuilding Corporation on 20 January 1915, launched in 30 June 1917, commissioned on 24 March 1919, decommissioned on 3 July 1945, sold on 24 November 1947 and broke up at Newark, New Jersey between 1947-1948. 

American battleship USS Louisiana temporarily missed while underway to ship breakers according to the Dutch newspaper De Telegraaf dated 8 January 1924

Connecticut-class

An item dated Norfolk, USA 7th reported that the American battleship Louisiana underway from Philadelphia, USA towards Baltimore, USA to be broken up was drifting helpless at sea with just 7 men on board, During a storm was she lost by the tug which towed and since then was unknown where she was. The Nieuwe Tilburgsche Courant dated 8th referred to a telegram that she was discovered and that tugs were sent to salvage her.(1)

Note
1. The BB-19. Connecticut-class consisting Connecticut, Louisiana, Kansas, New Hampshire, Minnesota and Vermont, preceded by the Virginia-class and succeeded by the Mississippi-class. Laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding Company on 7 February 1903, launched on 27 August 1904, commissioned on 2 June 1906, reserved and training ship for midshipmen and naval militia after 24 September 1915, training ship for gunners and engine room personnel since 6 April 1917, decommissioned on 20 October 1920 and sold on 1 November 1923 to be broken up. 

Japanese potential troop transport Nisshu Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.722 tons, gross tonnage 2.351 tons, transport capacity 800 men and owned by Okasaki Kisen Kaisha. Coal-fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Nipon Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.927 tons, gross tonnage 3.164 tons, transport capacity 1.050 men and owned by Okasaki Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Nanking Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.885 tons, gross tonnage 2.981 tons, transport capacity 950 men and owned by Osaka Chosen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Tatzan Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.952 tons, gross tonnage 3.193 tons , transport capacity 1.050 men and owned by Hashimoto Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Towa Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.836 tons, gross tonnage 2.962 tons, transport capacity 850 men and owned by Towa Taishi. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Togo Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.910 tons, gross tonnage 3.091 tons, transport capacity 1.000 men and owned by Yamashita Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Wednesday, 7 December 2016

Dutch fishing vessel Deo Volente (ARM-25) 1995-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, Netherlands, IMO 9115963, MMSI 246327000, registration number NLD199501910 and call sign PDPH. Casco built at the Scheepswerf Metz, Urk, Netherlands and completed by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands with yard number 1995.

Dutch fishing vessel Jacob Cornelis (SCH-45) 2001-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Scheveningen, Netherlands, IMO 9227572, MMSI 246273000 and call sign PBHE. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands in 2001. 

Dutch shrimps cutter (ex-Limanda 1973-2009) Ben Oni UK 53 2009-2016) Geertruida (YE-238) 2016-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 8432730, MMSI 244328000 and call sign PFOW Ex-Limanda renamed 2009 Benoni. Built at Scheepswerf De Klerk, Walsoorden, Netherlands in 1973. Sold by Kobus Post, Urk, Netherlands in October 2016 to A., M. en N. Sinke, Yerseke, Netherlands. 

American submarine USS T. 1 (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 1.106 (surfaced)-1.487 (submerged) tons, horsepower 4.000 (surfaced)-1.520 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of 2-3” guns and 8-21” torpedo tubes for which 16 torpedoes were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS T. 2 (1919) in 1923

Launched in 1919 , completed in 1920, displacement 1.106 (surfaced)-1.487 (submerged) tons, horsepower 4.000 (surfaced)-1.520 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of 2-13pd guns and 8-21” torpedo tubes for which 16 torpedoes were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923.

American submarine USS T. 3 (1919) in 1923

Launched in 1919, completed in 1920, displacement 1.106 (surfaced)-1.487 (submerged) tons, horsepower 4.000 (surfaced)-1.520 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of 2-13pd guns, 8-21” torpedo tubes for which 16 torpedoes were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 1 (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1920, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.062 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.200 (surfaced)-?(submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 2 (1919) in 1923

Launched in 1919, completed in 1920, displacement 800 (surfaced)-935 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.800 (surfaced)-1.170 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 3 (1918) in 1923

Launched in 1918, completed in 1919, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.092 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 4 (1919) in 1923

Completed in 1919, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.092 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 6 (1920) in 1923

Completed in 1920, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.092 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 7 (1920) in 1923

Launched in 1920, completed in 1922, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.094 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 8 (1920) in 1923

Launched in 1920, completed in 1922, displacement 854 (surfaced)-1.094 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

American submarine USS S. 9 in 1923

Displacement 853 (surfaced)-1.094 (submerged) tons, horsepower 1.400 (surfaced)-1.600 (submerged) hp, internal combustion oil-fired machinery while surfaced and electric while submerged and an armament of “1-3” gun, 4-21” torpedo tubes for which 12 torpedoed were carried.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands) inventory number 155. Fleets (the British Empire and foreign countries) on 1 February 1923. 

Dutch trawler Neeltje Jannetje (ARM 44) 1985-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, Netherlands, IMO 8509492, MMSI 245148000 and call sign PGFT. Owned and managed by Geertruida Rederij, Urk, Netherlands. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1985. 

Dutch trawler Maatje Helena (YE-138) 1997-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, IMO 9168427, MMSI 245933000 and call sign PDAU. Built at the Van der Werff&Vossier, Irnsum, Netherlands in 1997. 

US Navy rejected tender for delivery armour for Illinois-class battleships according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

Illinois-class

An item referred to the magazine Army and Naval Journal reporting that the US Navy rejected the tenders of the Bethlehem and Carnegie Company for delivery the armour plates necessary for the battleships Illinois (1), Alabama (2) and Wisconsin (3). The hulls were now to be further completed and not earlier as the authorities agreed with the price for the armour plates were the ships to be armoured.

Notes
1. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down at Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 10 February 1897, launched by Miss Nancy Leiter on 4 October 1898, commissioned on 16 September 1901, training ship since 1912, lent to the State of New York on behalf of th New York States Militia in 1919, decommissioned on 15 May 1920, converted into a floating armoury in 1924, renamed Prairie State and reclassified as IX-15 on 8 January 1941, barracks ship after Second World War, stricken on 26 March 1956 and sold to the Bethlehem Steel Company be broken up on 18 May 1955.
2. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down by William Cramp&Sons, Philadelphia, USA on 1 December 1896, launched on 18 May 1898, commissioned on 16 October 1900, extensively modernized 17 August 1909-begin 1912, decommissioned on 7 May 1920, handed over to the War Department on 15 September 1921, sunk while used by the Army Air Service on 27 September 1921 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1924.
3. Part of the Illinois-class consisting of the Illinois, Alabama and Wisconsin. Preceded by the Kearsage-class and succeeded by the Maine-class. Laid down by Union Iron Works on 9 February 1897, launched on 26 November 1898, commissioned on 4 February 1901, intensively modernized 1906-1908, training ship since1912, decommissioned on 15 May 1920, stricken on 1 July 1921 and sold to be broken up. In January 1922. 

US Navy fitting out USS Indiana with bilge keels similar to the USS Massachusetts according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

Indiana-class

An item referred to the magazine Army and Naval Journal reporting that the bilge keels fitted on the Massachusetts (1) performed such well during a voyage under unfavourable weather conditions that the navy decided to fit also out the Indiana (2) with such keels.

Notes
1. Indiana-class consisting of the Oregon, Massachusetts and Indiana, preceded by the Maine and Texas and succeeded by the Iowa. The first American battleships which were comparable by the ones built for European navies although still for coastal defence tasks with a freeboard such low that it was dangerous to act on the open oceans. Building ordered on 30 June 1890, laid down at William Cramp&Sons Ship&Engine Building Corporation, Philadelphia, USA on 25 June 1891, launched by Leila Herbert on 10 June 1893, commissioned on 10 June 1896, decommissioned on 8 January 1906, modernized including improving balance and traversing of main gun turrets, although considered to be obsolete still recommissioned on 2 May 1910, decommissioned on 23 May 1914, recommissioned on 9 June 1917, renamed Coast battleship Number 2 on 29 March 1919, decommissioned on 31 March 1919, stricken on 22 November 1920, loaned to the War Department, scuttled in shallow water off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, USA becoming a target for artillery experiments by the coastal batteries of Fort Pickens and even railway artillery since January 1921, transferred back to the navy on 20 February 1925, efforts to sell her to be broken up then and in 1956 were fruitless lacking satisfying bids and nowadays still existing as an artificial reef.
2. Indiana-class consisting of the Oregon, Massachusetts and Indiana, preceded by the Maine and Texas and succeeded by the Iowa. The first American battleships which were comparable by the ones built for European navies although still for coastal defence tasks with a freeboard such low that it was dangerous to act on the open oceans. Building ordered on 30 June 1890, laid down at William Cramp&Sons Ship&Engine Building Corporation, Philadelphia, USA on 7 May 1891, launched by Jessie Miller on 28 February 1893, commissioned on 20 November 1895, decommissioned on 24 December 1903, modernized including improving balance and traversing of main gun turrets, decommissioned on 9 January 1906, recommissioned on 24 May 1917, served as a gunnery training ship decommissioned on 31 January 1919, renamed coast battleship Number 1 on 29 March 1919, sunk while used as target in shallow waters in the Chesapeake Bay for aircrafts dropping dummy bombs on 1 November 1920 and sold to be broken up on 19 March 1924. In 1913 there seems to be plans have existed to use her as a target but which was not executed.

Torpedo tubes of American torpedo boat USS Dupont lengthened according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item reported that the torpedo tubes of the American torpedo boat Dupont were to be lengthened with at least 60cm to prevent that during the launching the torpedoes were dropped in her own wake.(1)

Note
1. The Du Pont (TB-7), building ordered on 2 March 1895, laid down at Herreshoff manufacturing Company, Bristol, Rhode Island in February 1896, launched on 30 March 1897, commissioned on 23 September 1897 and finally sold on 19 July 1920. Displacement 168 tons and an armament of 4-3,7cm/1.46”/1pd guns and 3x1-46cm/18” torpedo tubes. 

Confusing speed results of American gunboats USS Helena according to the Dutch magazine Marineblad dated 1897-1898 No. 6

An item referred to the magazine Army and Naval Journal reporting that the experience with the American gunboat Helena (1) again showed the difference between trial speeds and service speeds. At the provisional speed was with a draught of around 9 feet her speed 15,4 miles. Underway from New York, USA towards Washington, USA was her speed just 8 miles despite steaming with maximum power. While in service is her draught more as 15 feet. During the trial was steamed with forced draft, during her voyage with natural draft. Official tidings stated that ships on their trials were to be ballasted in such a manner to imitate their normal service load line. Within the navy was again spoken about fictive speeds after the results with the Helena became known.

Note
1. Laid down by Newport News Shipbuilding Company, Newport News, Virginia, USA on 10 October 1894, launched on 30 January 1896, commissioned on 8 July 1897 and finally sold to be broken up on 7 July 1934. 

Dutch trawler Geertruid Adriana (ARM-20) 2004-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, Netherlands, IMO 9302217, MMSI 245473000 and call sign PBLR. Owned by Marijs H.&B., Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 2004. 

Dutch fishing cutter (ARM-14) Grietje Geertruida 1992-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Owned by Rederij Delta, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Designed by Herman Jansen B.V. Built by Maaskant Shipyards BV, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1992. 

Dutch fishing vessel De Vrouw Jannetje (ARM-15) 1988-

Inner Harbour of Vlissingen, Netherlands 3 October 2015

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, IMO 8810774, MMSI 245542000 and callsign PDRE. Owned and managed by Meulmeesterschaier, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Built by Padmos Scheepswerf, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1988. 

Japanese potential troop transport Tenryu Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.603 tons, gross tonnage 2.520 tons, transport capacity 850 men and owned by Hankyo Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Japanese potential troop transport Shokwa Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1.824 tons, gross tonnage 2.554 tons, transport capacity 850 men and owned by Osaka Shosen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Japanese potential troop transport Shinko Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 9 miles, net tonnage 1. 886 tons, gross tonnage 3.084 tons, transport capacity 1.000 men and owned by Kishimoto Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands.

Japanese potential troop transport Shinmei Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.897 tons, gross tonnage 3.060 tons, transport capacity 1.000 men and owned by S. Hara. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Shinmei Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.449 tons, gross tonnage 2.433 tons , transport capacity 800 men and owned by Kishimoto Kisen Kasiha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Urusan Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.779 tons, gross tonnage 2.401, transport capacity 800 men and owned by T. Yamamoto. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Unkai No. 3 Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.989 tons, gross tonnage 2.765 , transport capacity 900 men and owned by S. Nakamura. Coa fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Otaru No. 3 Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.881 tons, gross tonnage 2.620 tons, transport capacity 850 men and owned by Yamashita Kisen Kaisha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Otaru No. 2 Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.708 tons, gross tonnage 2.755 tons, transport capacity 900 men and owned by T. Yamamoto. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Japanese potential troop transport Otaru No. 1 Maru in October 1921

On 22 May 1922 (!) received the Dutch naval staff at The Hague, Netherlands from the Dutch embassy at Tokyo, Japan a detailed specification of Japanese merchant ships of minimum 1.500 tons tonnage usable for troop transport over sea in October 1921. If the transport was over a short distance for instance Japan-Philippines or Japan-Chinese harbour was the transport capacity increased with 10% and on a distance within 24 hours even doubled. The figures were supplied by non-Japanese experts, partly based on the troop transports between Japan-China and Japan-Siberia. The transports were kept secret. At that moment was Japan already considered as a potential enemy. For each ship was mentioned how many troops included equipment could be transported over a longer distance, for instance to an island belonging to the Dutch East Indies. In February-March 1942 invaded Japan indeed the Dutch East Indies.

Speed 8,5 miles, net tonnage 1.393 tons, gross tonnage 2.247 tons, transport capacity 750 men and owned by Moji Kisen Jasiha. Coal fuelled cargo ship.

Source
Archive Dutch Naval Staff 1886-1942 inventory number 137 (National Archive at The Hague, Netherlands. 

Tuesday, 6 December 2016

Dutch fishing vessel (ex-IJM-63 2004-2015) Audacious (TH-2) 2015-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Former registered at Ijmuiden, Netherlands and since 1 September 2015 at Tholen, Netherlands. Length 6,5 metres and 1 ton tonnage One 65hp engine. Built in 2004. 

Dutch fishing vessel Jan Senior (ARM-7) 1987-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Arnemuiden, IMO 8718938, MMSI 245441000 and callsign PFBT. Owned by Grietje, Arnemuiden, Netherlands. Built by Scheepswerf Maaskant, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1987. 

Dutch euro cutter Boeier (SCH-18) 2000-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, registration number NLD200002610, IMO 9223083, MMSI 245370000 and call sign PFBM. Casco built at the Cenal Shipyard, Gdansk, Poland and completed at Padmos, Stellendam, Netherlands with yard number 158 in 2000. Owned by P. Knoester Jr. bv (Jaczon SCH), The Hague, Netherlands.

Belgian trawler Pieter (Z-56) 1999-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Belgium-flagged, homeport Zeebrugge, IMO 9152674, MMSI 205336000 and call sign OPCD. Built at the Stellendam Machinefabriek, Stellendam, Netherlands in 1999. 

British ship Abbie S. Hart underway from Philippines towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper 28 February 1889

An item reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship Abbie S. Hart underway from Manila, Philippines towards New York, USA. 

German bark Martha Brockelman underway from Argentina towards Siam according to the Dutch newspaper 27 February 1889

An item dated 25th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the German bark Martha Brockelman underway from Buenos Aires, Argentina towards Bangkok, Siam. 

British ship Hartfield underway from the USA towards the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper 27 February 1889

An item reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the British ship Hartfield loaded with petrol underway from New York, USA towards Batavia, Dutch East Indies. 

American ship Panay underway from the Philippines towards the USA according to the Dutch newspaper 25 February 1889

An item dated 24th reported the passing of Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies by the American ship Panay underway from Manila, Philippines towards New York, USA. 

German bark Carl W. Boman cruising in the Dutch East Indies according to the Dutch newspaper 25 February 1889

An item reported that the German bark Carl W. Boman received lying at Anjer, Dutch East Indies orders to go to Surabaya, Dutch East Indies. She came from Newcastle, New South Wales, Australia and passed on 22nd Nieuw Anjer, Dutch East Indies. 

Dutch inland cargo vessel (ex-Mariastein 1961-1978, Tahiti 1978-1982, Bema 1982-1985, Sylvia Regina 1985-1986, Maria Elsiena 1986-1994, Flora W 1994-2004) Xena 2004-

Inner harbour Vlissingen, Netherlands 2 December 2016

Netherlands-flagged, homeport Zaltbommel, Netherlands, EU 6000185 and ENI 02316825. Built by De Rupel, Rupelmonde, Belgium for Van de Broeck, Merksem, Belgium in 1961. Ex-Mariastein renamed 1978, Tahiti renamed 1982, Bema renamed 1985, Sylvia Regina renamed 1986, Maria Elsiena renamed 1994 and Flora W renamed 2004